The Protestants of Auvergne, Limousin, Lyonnais and Marche of the 16th and 17th centuries

Auvergne

Auvergne is a former region of south-central France. Prior to the French Revolution (1789 to 1799,) Clermont-Ferrand was its capital. After the revolution, Auvergne was sliced up into four modern-day départements: Allier with eight Protestant communes (villages, towns, townships, cities); Cantal with 17 Protestant communes; Haute-Loire with 13 Protestant communes and Puy-de-Dôme with 11 Protestant communes. – Sources: Wikipedia & Archives des consistoires 1317-1446 – 1520-1740 at the Archives nationales de France, Pierrefitte-sur-Seine (Paris)

Limousin

A former region of southwest-central France, Limoges was the regional capital prior to the French Revolution. Then, Limousin was divided into three modern-day départements: Corrèze with four Protestant communes; Creuse with six Protestant communes (a portion) and Haute-Vienne with 22 Protestant communes. – Sources: Wikipedia & Archives des consistoires 1317-1446 – 1520-1740 at the Archives nationales de France, Pierrefitte-sur-Seine (Paris)

Lyonnais

A former province of France in the south-east of France, this territory includes most of the greater region of the city of Lyon. Following the French Revolution, Lyonnais became the modern-day département of Rhône with six Protestant communes.  – Sources: Wikipedia & Archives des consistoires 1317-1446 – 1520-1740 at the Archives nationales de France, Pierrefitte-sur-Seine (Paris)

Marche

This former province in south-central France had Guéret as its capital prior to 1789. Post revolution, Marche became the modern-day département of Creuse with six Protestant communes. Sources: Wikipedia & Archives des consistoires 1317-1446 – 1520-1740 at the -Archives nationales de France, Pierrefitte-sur-Seine (Paris)

Here is the link to a 39-page research guide to the Protestants of this area: Protestants of Auvergne, Lyonnais, Marche

This is the last of a series of research guides to the Protestants of France of the 16th and 17th centuries. These regional guides were posted by Jacques Gagné between January and June, 2020. Most of the people who immigrated to New France were from the country’s north-west region, including Normandy. The majority of those who came to New France were Catholic, but some were Protestant. The research guide to this area can be accessed here : https://genealogyensemble.com/2020/03/02/the-protestants-of-anjou-beauce-bretagne-maine-normandie-perche-poitou-touraine-of-the-16th-and-17th-centuries/

Here are some resources to help you research Protestant ancestors in France:

How to Search for Huguenot Ancestors in France, May 20, 2018, https://genealogyensemble.com/2018/05/20/how-to-search-for-huguenot-ancestors-in-france/

Huguenot Family Lineage Searches, June 3, 2018, https://genealogyensemble.com/2018/06/03/huguenot-family-lineage-searches/

Researching Your French Ancestors Online, May 13, 2018, (the attached updated PDF describes how to research in the Archives départementales de France, the country’s 95 regional archives)  https://genealogyensemble.com/2018/05/13/researching-your-french-ancestors-online/

The National Archives of France, Jan. 27, 2019, https://genealogyensemble.com/2019/01/27/the-national-archives-of-france/

BNF Gallica (Bibliothèque nationale de France), Dec. 16, 2018, https://genealogyensemble.com/2018/12/16/bnf-gallica/

Finding Ancestors in French Municipal Archives, Sept. 23, 2018, https://genealogyensemble.com/2018/09/23/finding-ancestors-in-french-municipal-archives/

 

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