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The Acadians of Quebec

 

Between the early 1600s and 1755, a community of French-speaking farmers known as the Acadians thrived in Nova Scotia.

In 1755, war between France and Britain spilled into North America. When the Acadians refused to swear an oath of allegiance to the king of England, the colony’s British governor ordered the Acadian people deported. By the fall of that year, some 1,100 Acadians had been forced to board ships and were being transported to the American colonies including Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York. By 1758, most of the Acadians who lived on Île St. Jean (now Prince Edward Island) had also been deported. Some of the Acadians who escaped deportation died of starvation or disease.

Over the following years, the Acadians scattered. Some ended up in Louisiana and the Caribbean. Others sought refuge in New France, settling mainly in the Quebec City region, including Île d’Orléans and along the shores of the St. Lawrence River. Today, some of their descendants are still living in the province of Quebec while others have scattered across North America and around the world.

You can read an overview of the Acadian deportation, including a list of suggested books in English and French at http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/the-deportation-of-the-acadians-feature/

The best place to research the Acadians who settled in Quebec is at the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ). You can make telephone or email inquiries in English to the BAnQ in Montreal and to regional branches. For contact information about the Montreal branch and other regional branches, see: http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/

You should get a reply in English within a week to 10 days. These are free services available to anyone anywhere, in Canada or elsewhere. Similarly, you can email or telephone your question in English to the Grande Bibliothèque de Montréal (the main branch of Montreal’s public library) or to the Collection nationale within the Grande Bibliothèque de Montréal.

Here are two lists of books available on the subject, mostly in French, some in print, others digital:

http://iris.banq.qc.ca/alswww2.dll/APS_CAT_IDENTIFY?Method=CatalogueExplore&IsTagged=0&DB=BookServer&ExploreType=Subject&Stem=Acadiens–Qu%C3%A9bec%20(Province)%20&Style=Portal3&SubStyle=&Lang=FRE&ResponseEncoding=utf-8&Parent=Obj_459801367596814

http://iris.banq.qc.ca/alswww2.dll/APS_CAT_IDENTIFY?Method=CatalogueExplore&IsTagged=0&DB=BookServer&ExploreType=Subject&Stem=Acadiens–Qu%C3%A9bec%20(Province)–G%C3%A9n%C3%A9alogies%20&Style=Portal3&SubStyle=&Lang=FRE&ResponseEncoding=utf-8&Parent=Obj_37851487839769

Here are some other resources available at the BAnQ:

http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_chercheurs/description_fonds?p_anqsid=201602210002324708&P_classe=CA&P_fonds=301&P_centre=03Q&P_numunide=925880

http://iris.banq.qc.ca/alswww2.dll/APS_ZONES?fn=ViewNotice&q=441513

http://iris.banq.qc.ca/alswww2.dll/APS_ZONES?fn=ViewNotice&q=134450

Here are some other links to information about the Acadians:

http://www.federationacadienneduquebec.com/accueil.php

http://acadiens.radio-canada.ca/les-grandes-familles-acadiennes/

http://museeacadien.org/lapetitesouvenance/?p=1093

http://www.acadiensduquebec.org/acadieduquebec.shtml

http://www.acadienouvelle.com/arts-et-spectacles/2016/04/18/second-livre-andre-carl-vachon/

http://www.renaud-bray.com/Livres_Produit.aspx?id=1550163&def=D%C3%A9portations+des+Acadiens+et+leur+arriv%C3%A9e+au+Qu%C3%A9bec(Les)%2CVACHON%2C+ANDR%C3%89-CARL%2C9782349723147

http://www.acadienouvelle.com/arts-et-spectacles/2015/06/16/prix-acadie-quebec-andre-carl-vachon-emu-davoir-ete-choisi-avec-edith-butler/

http://www.acadiensduquebec.org/acadieduquebec.shtml

For each of the towns and villages of Quebec in which Acadians settled between 1755 and 1775, you will find posted below the web address of the regional repository of BAnQ, the address of the local Catholic parish and a listing of local cemeteries.

The regional repositories of BAnQ contain documents about the Acadian families who settled nearby. Some of the content of files stored at various branches of BAnQ across the province are listed within the Pistard search engine at www.banq.qc.ca however, most family lineage researchers are intimidated by the complex research process involved.

>> Bastiscan – Champlain

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1702.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Batiscan

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Bécancour – Nicolet

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/832.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=B%E9cancour

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Becquets (Saint-Pierre les-Becquets) – Nicolet

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/812.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=St-Pierre-les-Becquets

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Berthier – Lanaudière

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/351.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Berthierville

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> Cacouna – Lower St. Lawrence

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1093.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Cacouna

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_gaspesie_iles.html

>> Champlain – Champlain

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1710.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Champlain

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Gentilly – Nicolet

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1739.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Gentilly

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Îles-de-la-Madelaine – Gaspé

https://www.google.ca/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8 – q=Iles-de-la-Madelaine+%C3%A9glises

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=M&SS=99

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/banq_gaspe.html

>> Joliette – Lanaudière

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/357.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Joliette

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> Kamouraska – Lower St. Lawrence

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1250.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Kamouraska

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_gaspesie_iles.html

>> L’Acadie – Upper Richelieu

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1434.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=St-Jean-sur-Richelieu/L%27Acadie

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> L’Assomption – Lanaudière

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/485.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=L%27Assomption

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> Louiseville – Maskinongé

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1728.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Louiseville

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Maskinongé – Maskinongé

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1729.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Maskinong%E9

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Montcalm – Lanaudière

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/392.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=M&SS=50

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=F3&CID=1543

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> Nicolet – Nicolet

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/775.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Nicolet

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Pointe-du-Lac – St-Maurice

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1732.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Trois-Rivi%E8res/Pointe-du-Lac

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Rivière-du-Loup-en-haut (Louiseville) – Maskinongé

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1728.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Louiseville

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Saint-Denis-sur-Richelieu – Lower Richelieu

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1360.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=St-Denis-sur-Richelieu

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> Saint-Esprit – Lanaudière

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/388.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=St-Esprit

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> Saint-Jacques-de-Montcalm – Lanaudière

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/392.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=F3&CID=1543

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> Saint-Ours – Lower Richelieu

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1386.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=St-Ours

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> Saint-Sulpice – Lanaudière

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/725.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=St-Sulpice

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_montreal.html

>> Trois-Rivières – Trois-Rivières

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1778.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Trois-Rivi%E8res

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

>> Yamachiche – Maskinongé

http://www.leseglisesdemonquartier.com/1794.html

http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=F3&TY=V&SS=Yamachiche

http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/entrez_archives/centres_archives/ca_mauricie.html

 

Tracking Montreal Ancestors: Images of the Past

Many genealogists are aware that the Montreal’s McCord Museum has a large collection of digitized photographs taken in the 19th century studios of William Notman (1826-1891). Although it is best known for its photographs of Montreal’s English-speaking elite, the collection goes far beyond the studio, including pictures of Montreal’s Victoria Bridge, the Canadian Pacific Railway, First Nations people across the country and ordinary Montrealers at work and at leisure.

This is only one image collection of potential interest to genealogists researching Montreal. As you try to try to imagine the people and places that would have been familiar to your ancestors in what was once Canada’s largest city, here are some other resources that might inspire you.

The place to start exploring the McCord Museum’s images is http://www.musee-mccord.qc.ca/en/keys/collections/. This page links to the museum’s online collection of more than 122,000 images, including paintings, prints, drawings and photos. There are documents such as diaries, letters and theatre programs, as well as costumes and archaeological objects. While the museum’s collections focus on Montreal, they include images and objects from the Arctic to Western Canada and the United States. You can search the McCord’s online collection for an individual name, or you can browse time periods, geographic regions and artists.

Montreal from the Mountain

This is a view of Montreal from Mount Royal, near my ancestor’s house, around 1830.

The McCord also has a flickr page, https://www.flickr.com/photos/museemccordmuseum/albums.The historically themed albums on the flickr page include old toys, Quebec’s Irish community and an homage to women.

The Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ) is another excellent source of digital images, including photographs, illustrations, posters (affiches) and post cards (cartes postales) from the past. To start exploring these collections, go to http://www.banq.qc.ca/collections/images/index.html.

There are two collections of special interest to people with Montreal roots. The first is a collection of 22,000 photos taken by Conrad Poirier (1912-1968), a freelance photojournalist who worked in Montreal from the 1930s to 1960. He covered news (nouvelles), celebrities, sports and theatre, and he did family portraits, weddings, Rotary Club meetings and Boy Scout groups. I even found a photo of myself at a 1957 birthday party (fêtes d’enfants). You can search (chercher) the collection by subject or by family name.

The other collection of interest to people researching Montreal is the BAnQ’s Massicotte collection (http://www.banq.qc.ca/collections/collection_numerique/massicotte/index.html?keyword=*). Edouard-Zotique Massicotte (1867-1947) was a journalist, historian and archivist. The online collection mainly consists of photos and drawings of Montreal street scenes and buildings between 1870 and 1920. Some illustrations come from postcards, while others are clippings from periodicals. There are also a few blueprints and designs. The accompanying text is in French. You can search this collection by subject, by location, date of publication or type of image, or you can put in your own search term.

Philippe du Berger’s flickr page https://www.flickr.com/photos/urbexplo/albums is a gold mine of Montreal images. He includes contemporary photos of the city, including neighbourhoods that have recently been changed by big construction projects such as the new CHUM hospital. There are old photos of neighbourhoods such as Griffintown, Côte des Neiges and Hochelaga-Maisonneuve and he illustrates the transformation of the Hay Market area of the 1830s that eventually became today’s Victoria Square. Some albums include old maps to help the viewer put locations into geographic context.

The City of Montreal Archives has uploaded thousands of photos to its flickr page, https://www.flickr.com/photos/archivesmontreal/albums/. They are arranged in albums on various topics, ranging from city workers on the job to lost neighbourhoods, newspaper vendors, sporting activities and cultural events.

Photo:

James Duncan. Montreal from the Mountain, 1830-31. M966.61, McCord Museum. http://collection.mccord.mcgill.ca/en/collection/artifacts/M966.61?Lang=1&accessnumber=M966.61

This article is also posted on writinguptheancestors.blogspot.ca

 

The French Canadians in Western Canada

canewzz

 

The Archives nationales du Québec in Montréal on Viger Avenue are the repository of a wonderful and unique collection of books of marriages, baptisms, deaths of French Canadian families who left the Province of  Québec between 1840 and 1930 for destinations in Western Canada, especially in Alberta and Manitoba.

Monsieur Daniel Olivier,  former archivist at the Bibliothèque de la Ville de Montréal on Sherbrooke Street East, the latter no longer in operation, referred to for years as Salle Gagnon was responsible with the assistance of his associates for the acquisition of many of the books of marriages, baptisms, deaths, and burials outlined in this research guide.

Madame Estelle Brisson, former archivist at the Archives nationales du Québec on Viger Avenue East in Montréal with the assistance of her associates was also responsible for the acquisition of many of the books of marriages, baptisms, deaths, and burials outlined in this research guide compiled by Jacques Gagné.

Click on the link            The French Canadians in Western Canada

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