Destination: Amerikka

 

by

Claire Lindell

Amidst the many tombstones in a shady corner of Edgewood Cemetery in Ashtabula, Ohio is a very simple thick slab of granite, about the size of one of those washboards our mothers and grandmothers used to hand wash items before washing machines were invented. Inscribed on this granite in very large letters, as simple as the stone itself is the word  “AITI”. which means mother in Finnish. It is the resting place of my great grandmother1, Susanna Karhu (Klemola) who had immigrated to the United States in 1896.

_IGP6183_edited-1

Susanna was born in Waara, Finland in 1854. In their home country in 1876 at the age of  twenty-two Sanna married Johan Karhu. Over time they raised a family of eight children.

In 1893 Johan seized the opportunity to immigrate to the United States. He left his family in Finland and made his way to Ashtabula, Ohio, a port city on Lake Erie, where he worked on the docks and lived in the area of Ashtabula Harbor. At that time the port was thriving with constant activity. Large flat boats and barges loaded with coal and iron ore were sailing up and down the Great Lakes. These were prosperous times. New immigrants were eager to earn a decent wage.

Once settled, Johan sent for his family. In 1896 Susanna ( Sanna), at the age of forty-two along with her three youngest children, Ida, Jaako, and Lisa set sail by way of Hanko, Finland.2. They boarded the S.S. Cunard ship ‘Lucania’ in Liverpool, England en route to America. Ellis Island was their port of destination in America arriving  there on the 30th of May 1896,  and continuing on  to Ohio.

Very little is known about Sanna. We do know that her two oldest children chose to remain  in Finland. It must have been heart wrenching to know that she would be leaving behind these children and  two of her babies’ graves.

She was a housewife and at the time of her death August 18th 1929. She was 75 years old and among the oldest of the Finnish residents of Ashtabula Harbor having lived there over 30 years. Johan died in 1948. Where he is buried is still a mystery?

GGR-Gram-GGR-Jake-Vic Karhu

Sanna, Ida Susanna, Johan, Jaako and Lisa. Photograph taken several years

after arriving in the United States. Ida, my grandmother appears to be about fifteen or sixteen.

GGR-GR Karhu 50thAn@ Laine Farm

In a photograph taken during a family gathering in 1919 Sanna and Johan

are surrounded by their children, grandchildren and great-grand children.

 

Sources:

  1. 1. “Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images,FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X8PB-TC9 : 8 December 2014), Sanna Karhu, 18 Aug 1929; citing Ashtabula, Ashtabula, Ohio, reference fn 50528; FHL microfilm 1,991,908.
  2. 2. Finnish Institute of Migration

The Channel Islanders of Eastern Quebec

Société de généalogie et d’histoire de Rimouski

http://www.sghr.ca/en/publications

418-724-3242

sghr@globetrotter.net

The shores of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula, the Magdalen Islands, the North Shore of the Saint Lawrence River and an area of New Brunswick were settled by newcomers from the Channel Islands as early as the 1700s. The Channel Islands include Jersey and Guernsey and lie between Normandy in France and the southern coast of England. The immigrants to Canada were mainly men who came to work in the cod fishery and in shipbuilding enterprises run by entrepreneurs such as Jersey-born Charles Robin and the Janvrin brothers. They married local girls and started families.

Between 1998 and 2005, genealogist Marcel R. Garnier studied these families extensively and published a series of articles about them in the periodical l’Estuaire Généalogique, published by the Société de généalogie et d’histoire de Rimouski.

Garnier died in 2006 and his sister, Claudette Garnier (www.gogaspe.com/gcis/board.html) is the administrator of her late brother’s research material.

The Gaspé Jersey Guernsey Association (http://www.gogaspe.com/gcis/index.html) will conduct family lineage searches for a fee. Contact Suzanne Mauger, president, 418-752-6110. Copies of these magazines are also kept in the library of the Quebec Family History Society in Pointe Claire, Quebec, a suburb of Montreal, http://www.qfhs.ca/index.php.

Here are Jersey and Guernsey family names mentioned in Garnier’s articles:

Item # Estuaire 64 – 1997Les Jersiais et les Guernesiais de Gaspésie et des Iles-de-la-MadeleineChannel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in the regions of Gaspé & the Magdalen Islands – Pages 82 to 88 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Ahier, Alexandre, Ascah, Bailey, Bannier, Bartlert, Bechervaise, Becquet, Bichard, Binet, Bisson, Blackler, Bourgaize, Brehault, Briard, Brien, Brideaux,, Brouard, Cabot, Carrell, Cawley, Clough, Collas, Corbet, Coutanches, Delisle, Dennys, Dolbel, Domaille, Dorey, Du Haume, Dumaresq, Dupreuil, Eden, Ellis, Esnouf, Fairchild, Falle, Fruing, Galliard, Gallichan, Garris (de), Gaudin, Gavey, Godfrey, Gruchy (de), Guignon, Hamon, Handy, Horner, Hotton, Hounsell, Hué, Ingrouville, Janvrin, Jean, Jersey (de), La Marre (de), Langlois, La Perelle (de), Le Four, Le Huray, Le Mesurier, Le Montais Gruchy, Sainte-Croix (de) – Spouses : Alexander, Annett, Ascah, Baker, Baldwin, Bartlett, Bechervaise, Bichard, Blackhall, Boulay, Bray, Carcaud, Clarke, Côté, Coutanches, Couvert, de Gruchy, de Moulpied, Denis, Dion, Eden, Ellis, Flocchart, Fournier, Gasnier, Gaumont, Gavey, Giffard, Gruchy, Haley, Hamilton, Hennessy, Henry-Blampied, Jacques, Janvrin, Jouan, Lacques, Langlois, Le Cornu, Le Four, Lemesurier, Lenfesty. Le Feuvre, Le Grand, Le Huguet, Le Huquet, Le Huray, Le Mesurier, Lemesurier, Lerhe, Létourneau, Le Touzel, Luce, Marion, McCall, McGrath, Morin, Nixon, Ouellet, Pelletier, Priaux, Price, Pruing, Ramsden, Rideout, Roberts, Rose, Salter, Sarre, Savidant, Suddard-Davis, Tapp, Todvin (Tostevin), Tourgis, Touzel, Weary, West, White – 88 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 92 spouses

Item # Estuaire 65 – 1998Les Jersiais et les Guernesiais de Gaspésie et des Iles-de-la-Madeleine Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in the regions of Gaspé & the Magdalen Islands – Pages 4 to 9 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Journeau, Laffoley, Lamprière-Marett, Langford, Langlois, Le Bail, Le Bas, Leboutillier, Lebrun, Lechasseur, Lecornu, LeDain, LeDuc, Lee, Le Four, Le Garignon, Leggo, Legros, Le Guédard, Le Houillier, Le Huquet, Le Huray, Le Lacheur, Lelièvre, Le Maistre, Le Marquand, Le Masurier, Le Messurier, Le Mesurier, Le Mottée, Lenfesty, Le Prévost, Le Sauteur, Le Seeleur (Lescelleur), Le Templier, Le Touzel, Luce, Machon, Marett, Mauger, Minchinton, Mollet, Moulin (Mullin), Noel, Ozanne, Perchard, Pike, Pinel, Pipon, Piton, Priaux, Price, Queripel, Rabey, Robert, Roberts, Ropert, Rose, Roy, Salmon (Salomon), Salter, Sauvage (Savage), Savidant, Shaw, Simon, Slous, Skroeder, Snowman, Thelland, Tourgis, Tupper, Vautier, Vibert, Vigot, Wilson – Spouses : Arthur, Ascah, Averty, Bartlett, Beattie, Bellerive (Couture), Bichard, Bisson, Boone, Bourgaize, Bower, Boyle, Brouard, Burt, Cabot, Caron, Carter, Chevalier, Chiasson, Clark, Coffin, Collas, Coulombe, Couture (Bellerive) Cramahé, de Gaspé, de Gruchy, de La Perelle, Des Garris, Driscoll, Esnouf, Fitzpatrick, Fougère, Gallichan, Gauvreau, Gibbins, Glover, Halley, Hamon, Handy, Henley, Hoyles, Hyman, Kennedy, Killam, Laffoley, Lambert, Le Boutiller, Le Four, Le François, Legros, Le Lacheur, Leggo, Lemarquand, Le Mesurier, Lenfesty, Lepelly, Leruez, Le Touzel, Lockhard, Locket, Machon, Mauger, Mc Callum, Mc Kenzie, Minchinton, Nesbitt, Nicolle, Ozanne, Pendergast, Perry, Pirouet, Poingdestre, Poirier, Priaux, Rabey, Rail, Robert, Roberts, Robin, Rose, Russell, Salter, Simon de Gaspé, Stanley, Stuart, Sweeney, Synnott, Syvret, Taylor, Thompson, Tourgis, Trudel, Vincent, White, Williamson – 111 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 112 spouses.

 

Item # Estuaire 70 – 1999Les Anglo-Normands de la région de La Malbaie en Gaspésie The Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in the region of Malbaie in Gaspé County – Pages 41 to 46 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Agnes, Alexander, Alexandre, Amy, Barette, Becquet, Binet, Bertram, Boucher, Bower, Briard, Burman, Cabot, Cadoret, Carrel, Collas, Coombs, Couls, Creighton, Dallain, de Carteret, de Garris, de La Haye, de La Perelle, de Mouilpied, Devouges, Dorviss (Gossett), Dufeu, Esnouf, Fauvel, Gasnier, Girard, (Gérard), Gossett (Dorviss), Guillaume, Hacquoil, Hammon, Hamon, Hocquard, Hotton, Hubert, Ingrouville, Johnston, Kinsella, Langlais, Laurens, Le Bail, Leblancq, Le Boutillier, Lebrun, Le Coq, Le Couteur, Le Dain, Le Gresley, Le Gros, Lehre, Le Lacheur, Lelièvre, Lemaistre, Le Marquand, Le Masurier dit Mellon, Le Mesurier, LeMontais, Le Mottée, Lepage, Le Patourel, Lequesne, Le Roy, Letouzel, Levesconte, Mabille (Mabe), Machon, Marion, Mauger, Misson, Morrisson, Nicolle, Olivier, Pabasse, Parrée, Payne, Piton, Prével, Powell, Price, Raddley-Walters, Rebindaine, Richardson, Robin, Savage, Ste-Croix, Syborn, Syvret, Touzel, Tupper, Vardon, Vautier, Vibert, Wales, Walters – Spouses : Alexandre, Athot-Forsyth, Beck, Bond, Boyle, Briand, Bunton-Cass, Cabot, Carter, Cassivi, Chicoine, Clark, Cunning, Cyr, David, De Moulpied, Donahue, Doody, Doucet, Dumaresq, Element, Etesse, Francis, Gauthier, Girard, Hamon-Dumaresq, Hardy, Hayden, Hayden-Vardon, Hazelton, Henley, Hotton, Howell, Ingrouville, Johnston, Kennedy, Laffoley, Lamb, Lamy, Lebel, Le Boutillier, Lebrun, Le Cocq, Le Couvet, Legrand, Le Gresley, Le Maistre, Le Marquand, Le Mottée, Lenfesty, Le Page, Lucas, Mc Leay, Mc Carthy, Mc Kenzie, Mc Pherson-Buckley, Miller, Misson, Nicolle, Ogier, Packwood, Perrée, Poingdestre, Priaux, Pruing, Radley-Walters, Rail, Sainte-Croix, Samson, Simard, Suddard, Tapp, Tapp-Lucas, Touzel, Trudel, Vardon, Vautier, Vicaire, Withers, Wright – 131 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 122 spouses

 

Item # Estuaire 72 – 1999Les Anglo-Normands en Gaspésie dans la région de PercéThe Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in the region of Percé in Gaspé County – Pages 103 to 110 & 115 to 116 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Agnes, Ahier, Alexandre, Amy, Annet, Arnold, Aubert, Aubin, Baker, Balleine, Baptiste, Bauche, Baudains, Becquet, Bennett, Bertram, Biard, Bisson, Bossy, Bourgaize, Bower, Brideaux, Brochet, Le Brun, Bunton, Burman, Butlin, Cabot, Camiot, Carcaud, Caudey (Cody), Couilliard, Robin-Dane, De Caen, De Carteret, De Gruchy, De La Cour, De La Perelle, De Moulpied, De Quetteville, Des Reaux, De Veuille, Dufeu, Dumaresq, Duval, Fainton, Fauvel, Filleul (Fyall), Fiott, Fowler, Fruing, Fyott, Gale, Gallichan, Gaudin, Gibaut, Giffard, Godfrey, Gossett, Grindin, Gregory, Gruchy, Gunhall, Hamon, Hardeley, Hacquoil, Henry, Héraux, Hubert, Hué, Huelin, Hughes, Janvrin, Jean, Journeau, Laffoley, Langlois, Laurens, L’Aventure, Le Bas, Leblancq, Lebouthillier, Le Breton, Le Brocq, Le Brun, Le Cocq, Le Cornu, Le Couteur, Le Crinnier, Le Dain, Le Feuvre, Leggo, Le Grand, Le Gresley, Le Gros, Le Gruiek, Le Huray, Lelièvre (Lever), Lenfesty, Le Rossignol, Le Roux, Le Ruez, Le Sueur, Lever, Luce, Manning, Martel, Matthew, Mauger, Mercier, Mourant, Newberry, Nicolle, Noel, Olivier, Ollivier, Orange, Parrée (Perry), Payne, Perrée, Picot, Pinel (Picknell), Powell, Ramier, Remon, Renouf, Richardson, Robin, Robin-Daine, Romeril, Savage, Skelton, De Gruchy-Sutton, Sutton, Tardif, Tostevin, Trachy, Valpy, Vautier, Viel, Vibert, Weary, Wilson – Spouses : Arbour, Baker, Balleine, Barnes, Beaker, Beck, Bélanger, Biard, Bisson, Blackhall, Blake, Bond, Bourget, Boutin, Bower, Bree, Bunton, Butlin, Cass, Chouinard, Clark, Cloutier, Collin, Collins, Cooke, Cronier, de Carteret, de La Perelle, Desreaux, Dobson, Donahue, Dove, Driscoll, Dumaresq, Duthie, Duval, Enricht, Fauvel, Flowers, Flynn, Forsyth, Gallie, Gatain, Gaulin, Gibault, Giffard, Grenier, Hamon, Henley, Henry, Higginson, Horan, Hoyles, Hubert, Jacques, Janvrin, Jeune, Jewell, Kempfer, Laflamme, Laflamme-Chrétien, Lamb, Lambert, Langlois, Lawrence, Le Bailly, Le Bas, Leboutiller, Lebreton, Le Brocq, Le Cocq, Le Couvet, Leduc, Lee, Le Grand, Le Gresley, Lehmann, Le Huquet, Lemprière, Lenfesty, Le Touzel, Lindsay, Loisel, Lord, Lucas, Luce, Mahan, Mailloux, Mallett, Maloney, Maloney-Girard, Marett, Mauger, Mauger-Dobson, Mc Call, Mc Ginnis, Mc Neil, Mercier, Miller, Molloy, Morissey, Nicolle, Ogier, Ouellet, Packwood, Pallot, Phillippe, Pirouet, Piton, Remon, Richard, Robin, Sampson, Savage, Sheenan, Studdard, Sweeney, Ternett, Tostevin, Touzel, Travers, Trudel, Tuzo, Vardon, Vibert-Tuzo, Vickery, Williams – 216 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 163 spouses.

 

Item # Estuaire 75 – 2000 Des Jersiais et des Guernesiais de la Baie-des-Chaleurs The Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in Chaleur Bay in the Gaspé Peninsula –  Pages 84 to 93 Author : Marcel R. Garnier Families : Agnès, Ahier, Alexandre, Amy, Anez, Arnold, Arthur, Aubin, Aubin (Hoben), Baker, Balleine, Baptiste, Barette, Bauche, Baudains, Bean, Beaucamp, Bechervaise, Becquet, Bertram, Biard, Bisson, Blackmore, Blampied, Boizard, Bossy, Bott, Bouillon, Bourgaise, Bower, Bréhaut, Briard, Brideaux, Brochet, Brun (Le), Bunton, Cabot, Camiot, Carcaud, Carey, Carrel, Champion, Chantes, Chedore, Clark, Clarke, Clement, Caudey (Le) (Cody), Collas, Conway, Corbet, Corbin, Couillard, Coutanges, Dallain, Davey, De Caen, De Caux, De Faye, De Forest, Desgarris (Degarie), De Gruchy, De La Cour, De la Haye, De La Mare, De La Perelle, De Ste-Croix, Deslandes, De Veuille, Dolbel, Dubois, Du Feu, Du Haume, Dumaresq, Duval, Egré (Grey), Ennis, Esnouf, Fainton, Falle, Fallu, Fauvel, Filleul, (Fyall), Fiott (Fyott), Flannegon, Fleury, Fowler, Fruing, Gale, Gallichan, Gallie, Garnier, Gaudin, Gavey, Gibaut, Giffard, Godfrey, Gosset, Grandin, Gregory, Grenier (Garnier), Gruchy, Hacquoil – Spouses : Ahier, Alexandre, Almond, Annett, Aston, Athot, Aubin, Baker, Beaudin, Bean, Beebe, Bergeron-d’Amboise, Bertrand, Bisson, Blackhall, Boudreau, Bray, Brotherton, Butlin, Cass, Chedore, Collin, Collins, Cormier, Cyr, Day, Decaen, Deck, de Larosbil, Duguay, Duthie, Forest, Gallichan, Gallie, Gasnier, Gaudin, Gauthier, Gibeaut, Giffard, Guillot, Henley, Hocquard, Holmes, Horan, Janvrin, Journeau, Kempffer, Lambert, Landry, Laurent, Lebel, Leblanc, Leboutillier, Le Breton, Le Brocq, Le Gallais, Legrand, Le Gresley, Lemprière, Lenfesty, Le Touzel, Loisel, Lucas, Main, Mallett, Maloney, Malzard, Mauviel, Mc Grath, Mc Intyre, Mc Kenzie, Michel, Morissey, Munroe, Painchaud, Pallot, Paquette, Philippe, Picot, Poirier, Poulin, Priaux, Remon, Rochon, Rouet, Russell, Scott, Sheehan, Smith, Ste-Croix, Tostevin, Touzel, Trachy, Travers, Turnbull, Tuzo, Watt, Whittorn – 170 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 126 spouses

 

Item – Estuaire 76 – 2000Des Jersiais et des Guernesiais de la Baie-des-ChaleursThe Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in Chaleur Bay in the Gaspé Peninsula – Pages 100 to 110 & 115 to 116 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Hacquoi (Acou), Hacquoi (Acou & Harquail), Hamon, Hardeley, Hardy, Henry, Héraut, Hewittson, Hocquard, Holms (Holmes), Hotton, Hubert, Hué, Huelin, Jandron, Jarnet, Jean, Jenne, Jeune, Journeaux, Labey, Lamy, Langlois (Langlais), L’Arbelestier, Laurens, Laurent, L’Aventure, Lebas, Le Bas, Le Bellier, Leblancq, Le Bœuf, Le Boutillier, Le Breton, Le Brocq, Lebrun (Brown), Lebrun, Le Caux, Le Cocq, Le Cornu, Le Couillard, Le Couteur, Lecras, Le Dain, Le Feuvre, Lefevre, Le Floch, Le Galet, Le Gallais, Le Geyt, Le Grand, Le Gresley, Legros, Le Lièvre, Le Maistre, Le Marquand, Le Martree, Le Masurier, Le Moignan, Le Moignard, Le Mottee, Le Poidvin, Lequesne, Le Rossignol, Lesbirel (Lesbril), Lesbirel (Sperrell), Le Seeleur, Le Sueur, Le Templier, Le Vesconte, Lloyd, Lucas, Luce, Mallet, Malzard, Manning, Mansell, Marett, Martel, Martin, Mauger, Merry, Michel, Morin, Mourant, Mourant (Sutton), Neel, Nicolle, Normand, Norman, Olivier, Orange, Pallot, Park, Paten, Perchard, Picot, Pipon, Pirouet, Piton, Poingdestre, Powell, Prévost, Querrée, Rabasse, Rebindaine, Rimmeur (Ramier), Remon, Renault, Renouf, Riou, Rive, Robin, Romeril, Ropert, Roussel (Roussell), Roy, Sansans (Sauson), Savage, Seale, Sheppard, Skelton, Sious, Sohier, Spratt, Strong, Sutton, Syvret, Syvret (Sivrais), Tardif, Touzel, Trachy, Valpy, Vardon, Vautier, Venemont, Vibert, Vicq, Viel, Vincent, Wales, Weary, Westbrook, Wetherall, Wheaton – Spouses : Acteson, Adams, Allen, Ames, Anglehart, Arbour, Assels, Baker, Balfour, Balleine, Basset, Batson, Beaudin, Bechervaise, Beebe, Bellett, Bisson, Blais, Blampied, Blondel, Bouillon, Bossy, Boucher, Bourget, Boutin, Boyle, Caldwell, Carrel, Carter, Castilloux, Chambers, Chedore, Chiasson, Christie, Clement-Watt, Cocke, Collin, Cooke, Cormier, Couture (Bellerive), Cronier, Cyr, Day, De La Cour, de La Perelle, Doodridge, Dorey, Douglass, Dove, Dufeu, Duguay, Dumaresq, Dupuis, Duval, Element, English, Fiott, Fitzpatrick, Flowers, Foley, Forest, Gallie, Garrett, Gatain, Gaudin, Gaudreau, Gauthier, Girard, Glennan, Glover, Grenier, Hamon, Hellyer, Higginson, Hocquard, Holmes, Holms, Horth, Hotton, Huard, Huntingdon, Jenne, Jewell, Johnson, Kruze, La Brecque, Landry, Larocque, Laurent, LeBailly, Lebas, Lebrun, Le Cornu, Le Couteur, Le Gallais, Legallais, Le Grand, Lehmann, Le Huquet, Le Marchand, Le Marquand, Lemesurier, Lemoignan, Leriche, Le Touzel, Lindsay, Loisel, Mahan, Maher, Mann, Mauger, Mc Ginnis, Mc Rea, Meagher, Michel, Miller, Montgomery, Morissey, Morrissette, Munroe, Nelson, Newman, Payne, Pirouet, Piton, Pluma, Querrée, Rabasse, Robichaud. Robin, Roussy, Scott, Scott-Lindsay, Simon, Smith, Starnes, Ste-Croix, Sullivan, Sweeney, Tostevin, Tourgis, Travers, Tremblay, Trépanier, Tuzo, Valpy, Vardon, Vautier, Vicaire, Vicq, Vigneault, Ward, Weary, Whitton, Williston, Young – 296 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey and 195 spouses

 

Item # Estuaire 85 – 2003 – Des Jersiais et des Guernesiais sur la Côte-Nord du fleuve Saint-Laurent – Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled the North Shore of the St. Lawrence River – Pages 4 to 12 – Author : Marcel R. Garnier – Families : Agnès, Ahier, Ayerst, Bailhache, Barette, Bartram, Bechelet, Becquet, Binet, Bisson, Blampied, Bodman, Bray, Briard, Brown, Cabot, Camiot, Carcaud, Carrel (Carroll), Chevalier, Clarke, Clement, Cody (Caudy), Collas, Corbet, Corbey, Coutanches, Darby, de Caen, Degruchy, de La Haye, de la Perelle, de Quetteville, Des Champs, Devouges, Dimmick, Dorey, Duguay, Duhaume, Dumaresq, Durant, Durell, Falle, Fauvel, Fequet, Filleul, Fruing, Gallichan (Gallichon), Gallienne, Garnier, Gaudier, Gaudin, Gauthier, Girard, Godfrey, Grenier (Garnier), Grandin, Hamon (Homan), Hacquoil, Hawco, Hawkins, Hockey (Le Huquet), Hogan, Hounsell, Ingrouville, Jandron, Jarnet, Jennis, Labey, Le Blancq, Leboutillier, Le Brocq, Lebrun, Le Cocq, Le Cornu, Le Couteur, Le Dain, Lefeuvre, Lefloch, Le Gallais, Legeyt, Legrand, Legresley, Legros, Le Huquet, Le Maistre, Lemarquand, Le Marquand, Lemoignan, Lemonnier, Lemottée, Lenfesty, Lehre, Le Rossignol, Leroux, Leruez, Le Sauteur, Le Templier, Letemplier, Luce, Manning, Mansel, Martel, Mauger, Mauger (Monger), Mauger (Munger), Michel, Misson, Morel, Mourant, Newberry, Nicolle (Nichol), Noel, Olivier, Patriarche, Payne, Perrée, Perrée (Perry), Perchard, Perry, Petherick (Patriarche), Picot, Poingdestre, Pope, Prévost, Ramier, Renouf, Robert, Robin, Romeril, Salmon, Salomon, Savage, Skelton, Sutton (de Gruchy), Syvret, Syvret (Sivrais), Touzel, Trachy, Vardon, Vatcher, Vautier, Viel, Vibert, Vincent, Wheaton (Whitton) – Spouses : Anglehart, Athot, Baker, Ballam, Beaudin, Beaudoin, Beck, Beebe, Bernier, Bisson, Blais, Blampied, Bonenfant, Boulet, Boyle, Bréhaut, Buffet, Cabeldu, Cahill, Chambers, Chevalier, Chinic, Coffin, Collin, Cook, Cormier, Couture-Lamonde, Craib, Cummings, Cunning, de La Perelle, Doody, Doucet, Douglass, Duguay, Dulong, Dumaresq, Durvay, Duthie, Element, Fafard, Fixott, Flowers, Foley, Foreman, Gallichan, Gallienne, Gaudin, Gaudion, Gaumont, Gauthier, Gauvreau, Gibaut, Girard, Glenn, Gooseney, Grant, Guillemette, Hallahan, Hamilton, Hayward, Henley, Hocquard, Holms, Horan, Huard, Janvrin, Jean, Jones, Journeau, Keates, Kennedy, Landry, Langlish, Langlois, Larocque, Laurent, Lebouthillier, Leboutillier, Lebreton, Le Breton, Lebrun, Le Gallais, Legrand, Le Gresley, Lemarquand, Lemottée, Lenfesty, Letto, Levallée, Levasseur, Lilly, Loftus, Loisel, Lucas, Mailloux, Major, Mc Sweeney, Menicoll, Mercier, Michaud, Miller, Montgomery, Morency, Morrissette, Mullins, Nérée, Nickerson, Noel, O’Brien, O’Dell, Ouellet, Pagé, Paradis, Parent, Pelletier, Phillips, Piersay, Pike, Poirier, Rail, Robin, Roussy, Samson, Scott, Selesse, Sergent, Simard, Suddard-Davis, Tapp, Taylor, Thelland, Thériault, Touzel, Vallée, Vardon, Vignault, Vinacott, Walker, Whealan, Whittom, Wright – 178 male immigrants from Jersey and Guernsey and 162 spouses

 

Item # Estuaire 942005 – Des Jersiais et des Guernesiais au Nouveau-BrunswickChannel Islanders from Jersy & Guernsey who settled in New Brunswick – Pages 50 to 56 & 60 to 61 – Author : Marcel R. Garnier Families : Ahier, Alexandre, Amy, Amiraux, Blackler, Bosdet, Brien, Brouard, Butler (Le Bouthillier), Cabot, Chedore, Coutanges, Dayne, Desgarris (Degarie), de Gruchy, De Gruchy (De Gruchie), de La Garde, de La Perelle, de Quetteville, de Ste-Croix, Diney, Dolbel, du Fleur, Dufour, Duhamel, Dumaresq, Duval, Egré (Grey), Edwards, Ereault (Hereault), Falle, Foudrup, Fruing, Gibaut, Godfrey, Gravey, Hamon, Hamon (Hammond), Hacquail, Hacquoil, Harquail (Macquoil), Henry, Hocquard, Hubert, Huelin, Hughes, Knight, Laffoley, Laffoly, Le Bas, Le Bouthillier (Lebouthillier), Le Boutillier, Lebrocq, Le Caux, Le Couteur, Lecouteur, Lefloch, Le Furgey, Lefurgey, Le Gallais (Du Galet). Le Grand, Legresley, Legros, Le Lacheur, Le Maistre, Lemarquind, Le Marquand, Le Mesurier, Le Poidvin, Leriche, Lesueur, Letemplier, Leventure, Lie, Lloyd, Locke, Luce, Mahy, Mauger (Majer), Michel, Monet, Morel, Morris, Mourant, Nichols, Oliver, Orange, Painter, Pallot, Picot, Pirouet, Piton, Powell, Quennault (Canot), Querrée (Kerry – Carey – Querry), Rabasse, Ramier (Rimeur), Renouf, Rive, Robert, Robin, Sarre, Sheppard, Sommany, Stavidant,, Strong, Studely, Syvret (Sivret), Tardif, Thomas, Tourgis, Vaudin, Vautier, Veal (Viel), Vibert, Vicq, Vigot, Vincent, Warne, Weary, Williams, Young – Spouses : Ahier, Albert, Alexandre, Arsenault, Beebe, Bisson, Ballam, Blackhall, Blondel, Borey, Boudreau, Boutin, Boyle, Brien, Brotherton, Brown, Carter, Charleston, Chedore, Chiasson, Christie, Comeau-Baldwin), Daiguillot (Guilot), Day, de La Parelle, Duclos, Duguay, Dumaresq, Duval, Edwards, Fauvel, Fitzpatrick, Forest, Gallie, Gaudreau, Giraud, Glover, Godin, Guillot, Haché, Hains, Hamilton, Hayden, Hellyer, Higginson, Hollands, Holms, Hotton, Hubert, Huelin, Jennie, Johnson, Kruse, Landry, Langlois, Lateigne, Lawlor-Dwyer, Leblanc, Lebreton, Lebrocq, Le Gallais, Maillet, Mailloux, Mallet, Mann, Many, Mc Carthy, Mc Kay-Hubon, Mc Kenzie, Mousse, Mowatt, Newman, Newton, Nixon, O’Connor, Poulin, Prévost, Quennault (Canot), Querrée, Radley (Walters), Robichaud, Stewart, Sutherland, Thériault, Thomas, Tourgis, Vautier, Vibert (Tuzo), Vincent, Walker, Ward, Warnes, Williston, Winterflood,, Yvonne – 168 male immigrants from Jersey and Guernsey and 120 spouses 

 

The above research guide was researched and compiled by Jacques Gagné

gagne.jacques@sympatico.ca

2016-03-05

 

Samuel William OBray, Mormon, Pioneer Polygamist

Panting with the effort the young man hurried through the night. Under one arm he carried his bundle of belongings and in his other arm, his three year old son Thomas. Samuel OBray  had left Bootle, Liverpool in great haste and was headed to the Liverpool Docks with his precious bundles to board the Ellen Maria (1) sailing soon for New Orleans USA for a new life in America.

Samuel was a shipwright. He joined the Church of Latter Day Saints (or Mormons) on the 6th February, 1846, before his first marriage to Margret Harris in November 1846 in Pembroke Dock, Wales. Samuel and Margret had two sons, Thomas and John. Margret had never agreed with his religious beliefs so unbeknownst to her, Samuel had booked passage for himself and his eldest son, Thomas to New Orleans Louisiana later, to join the rest of the ‘Mormon Saints’ in Utah or Zion as they called it. Samuel left behind him, his wife Margret and their youngest son John.

The ship was due to leave port on 29th January 1851 but had been anchored in the River Mersey for two days due to storms until it was deemed safe enough to set sail. Whilst on board, Samuel had befriended other Mormon Saints on the ship, particularly a family named Bainbridge. They were a family of six. Three sons and three daughters. Eleanor was the second daughter and she and Samuel struck up a friendship.

According to the ‘Biography of Samuel William OBray and Eleanor Bainbridge Obray’ (2) there are two versions of what happened  when Margret realised what Samuel had done.

In the first family legend, she reported it to the authorities who headed to the Docks and searched the ship but could not discover Thomas. During the search of the ship Samuel had persuaded the Bainbridge family to claim Thomas as their own. Whilst the authorities were looking for a small boy Thomas had been dressed as a little girl and integrated into the Bainbridge family.

In the second version Samuel was able to steal the oldest boy from his mother and took him on board the ship Ellen Maria just prior to its departure. The boy had red hair and Samuel was able to place him with a family of red-headed children so that when the police came aboard they could not find him. The boys name was Thomas William, age three.

Poor Margret never did find her son. Was she on the dock when the ship sailed from Liverpool on the 2nd February 1851? If so, how must she have felt as she watched the ship sail away? It can only be imagined.

Upon arrival in New Orleans, The OBray and Bainbridge families were not able financially to continue their journey to Utah so they stayed and worked until they were able to continue. Whilst in New Orleans Samuel and Eleanor married and their first child, Ellen Jane was born. (3) They went on to have eight more children and Samuel took a third plural wife, but there were no children from this union. However, according to his obituary  (4) as it appeared in “The Journal” 11 June 1910:

 His descendants number about 176, as follows: 10 children 87 grandchildren 75 great-grandchildren and four great-great grandchildren”

Samuel William OBray was my second great grand uncle.

The ship Ellen Maria prepares to sail from Liverpool, England, for America on February 1, 1851. At the time, over 50,000 Latter-day Saints lived in the British Isles. Emigration was possible as the result of the Perpetual Emigrating Fund, which loaned money to impoverished Latter-day Saints on the promise they would repay the loan so others could emigrate. Thousands of converts emigrated to join the Saints in America.

The ship Ellen Maria prepares to sail from Liverpool, England, for America on February 1, 1851. At the time, over 50,000 Latter-day Saints lived in the British Isles. Emigration was possible as the result of the Perpetual Emigrating Fund, which loaned money to impoverished Latter-day Saints on the promise they would repay the loan so others could emigrate. Thousands of converts emigrated to join the Saints in America.

samuel William O'Bray and Eleanor Bainbridge

Samuel OBray and Eleanor Bainbridge OBray

Sources

1 https://mormonmigration.lib.byu.edu/mii/passenger/44709

2 http://welshmormon.byu.edu/Resource_Info.aspx?id=2592

3  ‘The New World having Become Attractive To Thomas Sharratt, he came to America and Settled” Andrew Jenson, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia Vol. 3 p 514

4 http://welshmormon.byu.edu/Resource_Info.aspx?id=789

Enjoying the Story of Westmount

A-View-Of-Their-Own-the-Story-of-Westmount

I began looking for traces of the Huguenots that my grandmother always told me were in the family. First, I looked for anyone born in Blois, Orléans, Paris, Rouen or Tours France sometime after the Affair of the Placards. These are the towns in which people posted signs questioning Catholic dogma overnight on October 17, 1534. The incident set off the reformation and eventually led to hangings and mass migration of Protestants out of France.

Unfortunately, my genealogical records don’t extend far into France during the 1500s, so that research will be for another day.

My journey through the Hurtubise side of my family, however, led me upon a wonderful history of Westmount called A View of Their Own: The Story of Westmount, written by Aline Gubbay in 1998. The little guide introduced me to several early maps of Montreal I hadn’t seen before, Montreal’s Mohawk name “”Kawanote Teiontiakon” and a hint about how some of my distant ancestors lived. Gubbay describes the geology of Montreal in a way that allows you to really imagine how things used to be.

The western part of the island was distinguished by a little mountain Westmount — some 600 feet high, formed by an outcropping of a larger rise, Mount Royal. Iroquoians had discovered that the slope of the little mountain, facing south-east, was sheltered from the strongest northern winds, a factor which, together with abundant water from the mountain springs, made for a richly fertile soil where they could cultivate their traditional crops of beans and corn. (p 11)

My ancestors get a small mention on page 15:

One by one the families arrived, settling along the Indian trail now given the name of Côte St. Antoine. They included names such as Des Carries (sic), Prud’homme, Leduc, Pierre et Jean Hurtubise, and St. Germain.

(Fascinating how Gubbay missed the French word “et” in her paragraph, something I frequently do in my texts. Bilingualism can be quite troubling sometimes.)

She continues:

Most of the men were artisans, recruited from towns of northern France for their skills as stonemasons, millers, brewers, but they soon acquired the new skills necessary to clear and cultivate the land. In winter, after the land had been cleared, the trunks of the trees were gathered, carried down to the water and lashed together on the rim of a frozen lake, Lac St. Pierre. When the ice melted in the spring the lumber was floated through a short inlet to the St. Lawrence River and rafted along the shore for sale at Ville Marie, now renamed Montreal.

If you have Clarks, Dawsons, Dionnes, Elgins, Enslies, Hays, Hendersons, Lighthalls, Mackays, Monks, Murrays, Newnhams, Ohmans, Parés, Shearers, Smithers or Timmins in your family, you’ll find gems about their lives in this book. If you appreciate reading about the Town of Westmount, the borough of NDG or Montreal history, this is definitely a story you’ll want to discover.

At only 151 pages, A View of their Own: The Story of Westmount is a quick and easy read. Gubbays smooth writing style and her use of many anecdotes make it entertaining as well. I highly recommend it.

Société d’histoire et de généalogie de Rivière-du-Loup

http://www.shgrdl.org/

418-867-6604

info@shgrdl.org

The small city of Rivière-du-Loup, located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, dates back to 1673, when the region was given to prosperous merchant Lord Charles-Aubert de la Chesnaye. The town began to expand in the early 19th century and the population increased with the arrival of the Grand Trunk railway in 1859.

Between 1850 and 1919, the town was called Fraserville. Malcolm Fraser had been an officer in the British army that defeated the French troops at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in Quebec City in 1759. Fraser stayed in Quebec following the conquest and he was put in charge of the seigneury at Rivière-du-Loup in recognition of his service on the battlefield. (See http://www.manoirfraser.com/page/historique.php for a brief history of the Fraser family and their home.) In 1919, the town changed its name to Rivière-du-Loup.

Rivière-du-Loup’s economic base has always been agriculture and forestry, but many area residents have also worked in the transportation industry on the St. Lawrence River. The river is salty and tidal at Rivière-du-Loup and it is 24 kilometers (15 miles) wide. The city also serves as a service centre for the surrounding area. Rivière-du-Loup is in a beautiful location and its summers are cool, so it has attracted summer residents to nearby towns such as Cacouna since the mid-19th century.

The local history and genealogy society (www.shgrdl.org) has produced a number of French-language brochures and books, including family histories and several publications about the railway. See http://www.shgrdl.org/shgrdla.htm#items.

Three publications, researched and prepared by society members, provide genealogical information that may not be available elsewhere. They are:

 Des Écossais à la Rivière-du-Loup et leurs descendants – The Scots of Rivière-du-Loup and their descendants (1763-2004) – Marriages, baptisms, deaths – A book of 594 pages in the French language addressing more than 400 different family names among the churches of Rivière-du-Loup, the South Shore of the St. Lawrence River, Charlevoix, Saguenay, Lac-St-Jean Counties north of the St. Lawrence River plus the Gaspé Peninsula. The genealogist who researched this book transcribed records from the area’s Catholic, Anglican, Presbyterian, Methodist and Congregationalists churches. $50 + $10 shipping.

St-Patrice de Rivière-du-LoupSt. Patrick CatholicBaptisms(1813-1992)  $50 + $12 shipping.

St-Patrice de Rivière-du-LoupSt. Patrick CatholicDeaths (1813-1992) $40 + $10 shipping.

Today, the people of Rivière-du-Loup are primarily French-speaking, but many English-speaking families lived in the area in the past.Following is a list of Scottish, British and Irish families that lived in the Lower St. Lawrence region after 1763, including the present-day districts of Bellechasse, Charlevoix, Dorchester, Kamouraska, L’Islet, Matane, Montmagny, Rimouski, Rivière-du-Loup and Témiscouata:

Scottish, British, Irish Families of the region from 1763 onward

Adams, Achison, Alexander, Allan, Allen, Allison, Amsden, Anderson, Arbour, Archibald, Armstrong, Arthur, Atkinson, Austin, Ayton, Bagley, Bagnall, Baikie, Balfour, Ballantyne, Barr, Baron, Barron, Barry, Bartholomew, Bartley, Baxter, Beatty, Beck, Bell, Bennet (t), Berger, Bett, Birrell, Bissett, Black, Blackadder, Blackburn, Blain, Blair, Bolton, Bond, Booth, Boswell, Bower, Boyd, Boyle, Bradley, Briggs, Brogan, Brown, Bryson, Buchanan, Buck, Buist, Burgess, Burns Butchart, Butler, Caddel, Cahill, Caissy, Calway, Cameron, Campbell, Canady, Carmichael, Carr, Carroll, Carson, Carter, Cassels, Cassidy, Cavanagh, Clark, Clarke, Clement, Clerk, Clouston, Coleman, Collin, Collins, Colman, Connell, Cook, Cooke, Cooper, Cowan, Cowen, Cowie, Craib, Craig, Crawford, Critchton, Crockett, Croft, Crook, Cullen, Cummings, Dalton, Davidson, Davis, Davison, Dawson, Day, Dewar, Dick, Dickie, Dickner, Dickson, Dillon, Dobson, Dodbridge, Doherty, Donaldson, Dougherty, Douglass, Downes, Downing, Doyle, Drisdell, Drummond, Duncan, Dunn, Easton, Edgar, Ellement, Elliott, Ellis(s), Ewen, Ferguson, Fergusson, Findlay, Ficher, Fisher, Fitzsimmons, Flack, Fletcher, Flowers, Floyd, Foote, Forbes, Forest, Forrest, Forsyth, Foster, Fox, Francis, Fraser, French, Furlong, Gallagher, Gardner, Garvie, Gathwaite (Garwiitts), Gibson, Gifford, Gilchrist, Giles, Gilklet, Gillies, Gleeson, Glenny, Godcharles, Gold, Gordon, Grant, Gray, Green, Greer, Gregory, Geig, Grey, Griffin, Hackett, Hall, Halle, Hally, Hamilton, Hammond, Handfield, Hannay, Harbour, Harcourt, Harding, Hardy, Haresson, Harkness, Harper, Harrison, Harrower, Hart, Harton, Harvey, Harvie, Haslett, Hay, Hayward, Healey, Heaslet, Henderson, Henley, Henry, Heppel, Heppell, Herdman, Hibbard, Hill, Hins, Hodgson, Hogg, Holdron, Hoff, Holt, Holmes, Hope, Horner, Hould, Hovington, Howden, Howe, Hudson, Hume, Hunter, Hurley, Hutchison, Irvine, Irving, Jackson, Jacob, Jamieson, Jarvis, Jeffery, Jenkins, Jennis, Johnson, Johnston, Jones, Jopsing, Kack, Keighan, Kelly, Kennedy, Kenney, Kerr, Kidd, King, Kirby, Knox, Krieber, Lamb, Lane, Lang, Langis, Laurenson, Law, Lawrence, Lawson, Leach, Lee, Leggatt, Leitch, Leith, Lemesurier, Lever, Lewis, Lindsay, Lister, Litch, Lock, Lockhead, Long, Loof, Lord, Lucas, MacAllum, McBean, MacCarron, McCleary, McClintock, MacClure, McClure, MacConnell, McConnell, MacCourt, McCourt, McCraw, MacCutcheon, McCutcheon, MacDermott, McDermott, MacDonald, McDonald, MacDonell, McDonell, MacDougall, McDougall, MacEwen, McEwen, McEwing, MacFadden, McFadden, MacFarlane, MacFarquhar, MacGee, McGee, MacGowan, McGowan, MacGrath, McGrath, MacGregor, McGregor, MacGuire, McGuire, MacHenry, McHenry, MacHugh, McHugh, MacIntosh, McIntosh, MacIntyre, McIntyre, MacKay, McKay, MacKel, MacKelly, McKelly, MacKenna, McKenna, MacKenney, McKenney, MacKenzie, McKenzie, MacKey, McKey, MacKillop, McKillop, MacKim, McKim, MacKinley, McKinley, MacKinnon, McKinnon, MacLaren, McLaren, MacLaughlin, McLaughlin, MacLean, McLean, MacLellan, McLellan, MacLeod, McLeod, McLure, MacMahon, McMahon, MacMillan, McMillan, McMullen, MacNab, McNab, McNeely, MacNeill, McNeill, MacNess, McNess, MacNichol, McNichol, McNicoll, McNider, McNie, McSwanny, MacVey, McVey, MacWhinnie, McWhinnie, MacWhirter, McWhirter, MacWilliams, McWilliams, Malloy, Mann, Mansfield, Marshall, Marugg, Mason, Mathers, Matheson, Mathews, Mathieson, Matthews, Maxwell, May, Meaney, Meehan, Mellis, Mercer, Middlemist, Milburn, Miles, Miller, Mills, Milne, Mitchell, Moffat, Moffett, Molloy, Montgomery, Moore, Moran, Morgan, Morrin, Morris, Morrissey, Morrisson, Morrow, Mudge, Muir, Murdoch, Murphy, Murray, Nawling, Neil, Nelson, Nepton, Newberry, Nicholson, Nichols, Nicol, Nickols, Nixon, O’Conner, O’Connor, O’Connors, Orkney, Ogilvie, Otis, Page, Pard, Parker, Parkes, Paterson, Patterson, Patton, Peacock, Pearson, Pentiga, Perry, Peters, Pettigrew, Phillips, Pickford, Pollock, Pope, Porter, Power, Pratt, Preston, Price, Prior, Purcell, Quimper, Quinn, Rae, Ramming, Ramsay, Ramsey, Randall, Rankin, Rattray, Reader, Reed, Reid, Richard, Richardson, Riopel, Ritchie, Robbins, Roberts, Robertson, Robin, Robinson, Rodger, Rodgers, Roger, Rose, Ross, Rudiack, Rutherford, Ruthven, Ryan, Sample, Samson, Sargeant, Scherrer, Scott, Seaton, Seton, Shannon, Sharp, Sharpe, Shaw, Sheehy, Shields, Short, Simson, Sinclair, Skelling, Skene, Sladek, Slater, Smith, Smyth, Speers, Speirs, Standford, Stanley, Stein, Stephenson, Stevens, Stevenson, Stewart, Storrie, Stuart, Suck, Sutherland, Swan, Swinford, Synnett, Synnoth, Synnott, Tapp, Taylor, Temple, Thom, Thoms, Thomas, Thompson, Tolerton, Towers, Townsley, Trickey, Turner, Urquhart, Veitch, Vivian, Walker, Wallace, Wallis, Walsh, Walter, Walton, Ward, Wardrop, Ware, Warren, Watson, Watt, Watters, Wayne, Webster, Wells, Welsh, Whellan, White, Whyte, Wickens, Wilkens, Williams, Willis, Wilson, Winichuk, Winters, Wintle, Wiseman, Wood, Woods, Woodland, Wren, Wright, Yates, Young

Sources of the above listing of family names: Jeannine Ouellet, Dennis McLane, Université Laval, La Corporation culturelle de Frampton, Société de généalogie de Rimouski.

An Ill-fated Social Experiment

Royal Arthur School

80 Canning Street

September 30, 1912

Dear Mother,

I am writing this in school to tell at last taken that long talked of flat and while I think (of it) will tell you the address; it is 2401 Hutchison St. and is almost next door to the McCoy’s which makes it fine for us. We moved in on Sat last (Sept 28) and they have been in cooking and doing all sorts of things for us. Mr. McCoy gave us a basket of peaches to start on.

The flat is completely furnished and is lighted by electricity and we do all our cooking by gas. There are four girls in the scheme, Flora, May, Lena Bullock who is a school teacher, too, and yours truly. We are planning to pay 20 dollars each per month and hope to be able to make ends meet but if we cannot then we will get another girl to come in with us.

The flat itself costs us $40.00 then we will have the rest for running expenses. When you come take an Amherst car up Bleury and get off at St. Viateur. And we will let you see what sort of housekeepers we are.
This is the first part of a missive written by Marion Nicholson, school teacher at Royal Arthur School in the Little Burgundy district of Montreal, to her mother, Margaret, back home in Richmond, Quebec.

By today’s standards, the letter contains nothing earth-shattering: a young working woman has taken an apartment with three other girls and is anxious to tell Mom all about it.

But, it is,indeed, an extraordinary letter.  In 1912, when the correspondence was penned, it was unacceptable, borderline illegal even, for women in the big cities of Canada to move in together to share expenses.

First, there was the problem of prostitution, so any such arrangement was highly suspect.  And then there was the problem of, well, personhood, that is no one would rent to a woman, even a woman with a steady salary, because these women couldn’t sign a lease.

Most women didn’t have a bank account, and those wealthy women who did couldn’t keep more than $2,000. in it.

Marion cashed her paycheque of 60 dollars a month at Renouf’s, a store that sold textbooks to the Montreal Board.

Official records reveal that between September 1912 and May 1913, 2401 Hutchison, in the Mile End district of Montreal, was occupied by another family that had been living there for years.  So, Marion and her friends did not sign any official lease.

Their unusual sublet was no doubt enabled by the McCoys mentioned in the letter.  The McCoys were family friends from a pioneering  Richmond  family.

 

marion margaret

Margaret Nicholson and daughter Marion in Richmond in 1912. Letters reveal that her family was afraid for Marion, she had become so thin.

The earlier letters in ‘the Nicholson collection’ explain why Marion was so excited about getting her own apartment. For a few years, she had boarded at a rooming house on Tower, in Westmount, run by a widow named Mrs. Ellis.  As was likely the custom, this Mrs. Ellis “lorded it over” her female charges, (Marion’s words) making sure they towed the line, especially when it came to male visitors and curfews.

In 1910, in the big bad city, even a well-connected 27 year old women like Marion Nicholson was considered in need of protection.  Besides, no respectable widow wanted to be accused of running a bawdy house.

In late 1911, Marion began seeing a certain Mr. Blair, a very eligible lumber merchant, which made her especially hate her curfew.  In 1912, already bone-tired from managing her class of 50 “very bad” second graders, she ran herself ragged in her spare time looking for a flat to live in.

Then, in late September she found that flat. And it even had electricity, a luxury her lovely family home in the fancy section of Richmond, Quebec wouldn’t have until the next year.

Family letters reveal that Mr. Blair or “Romeo” was a regular visitor at 2401 Hutchison during the fall and winter of 1912/13, not that Marion talked about his visits in her letters home. Flora, her younger sister, was the one who spilled the beans.

Oh, my!

Still, in the end, this bold feminist experiment didn’t work out, but not because of any sex scandal.

Running a home back then was just too labour intensive for women who worked during the day, even a home with a newfangled gas stove.

That’s why, during the winter of 1913, Marion and her flat mates relied on a series of older female relations, including mother Margaret, to keep house for them on a rotating basis.

In May 1913, the girls abandoned their flat on Hutchison and moved into a hotel room downtown at the Mansions on Guy Street.  Supposedly, they left behind a big fat mess.

 

Flora Mae Watters.PNG

Flora (front) and Mae Watters, around 1908 in Richmond, Quebec. Mae would get married in 1914 but Flora only much later, when in her forties.

Marion Nicholson soon became engaged to Mr. Blair.  She was disillusioned at work because a “mere boy out of school” had been hired over her head and given the much coveted  7th form, a position second only to the (male) principal, is how she described it to her father.

Sister Flora and Mae, a first cousin, returned to Mrs. Ellis’ much despised rooming house on Tower because they simply had no other place to go.

In the 1910 era, there was a dire shortage of accommodation for working women in Montreal.  In fact, Montreal’s leading citizens, including Mssrs. Birks and Reford, Mrs. Molson, Reverend Symonds of Christ Church Cathedral and Miss Carrie Derick of  the Montreal Local Council of Women, were holding public meetings to organize a hotel downtown just for women,  ‘respectable’ women (sic) where the girls could spend their evenings engaged in wholesome activities and presumably not cavorting around town at Vaudeville theatres, motion picture palaces, or at Dominion Park, the enormous thrill park on Notre Dame East.*1

Marion, who enjoyed all of the above activities, didn’t write anything in her letters about this critical community project, but I can guess what she thought about it.

In 1906, while attending McGill Normal School near what is now Place Bonaventure, she roomed at  the YWCA on Dorchester and simply hated it. “Too many rules,” she wrote home to Mom.2

  1. Montreal Gazette. Definite Start to Women’s Hotel. November 18, 1910.
  2. Marion Nicholson would marry, have four children and be widowed in 1927. She would go back to teaching and rise to be President of the Montreal Protestant Teacher’s Union during the WWII years. She fought for higher salaries and pensions for teachers, but died before she could earn one herself.  She was honored with an editorial in the February 16, 1947 Montreal Gazette that began: With the death of Marion A.N. Blair the teaching profession in the province, indeed, the whole Dominion, has suffered a serious loss.

Great Grandmother’s Quilt: Eliza Jane Eagle

I have a sampler made by Susan Dodds Bailey, my two times great-grandmother, but much more has survived made by her daughter Eliza Jane. My favourite item is a wool quilt.

The quilt is a traditional bow tie pattern, made from scraps of suiting and other old clothes. Reds, blues and greens in plains, plaids and a few polka dots march across the front. It was all hand stitched. For many years, it was put away in a closet but now summer has it spread out on the day bed, on the verandah of our country cottage. Many an afternoon nap has been taken on it. The quilt had begun to show wear, especially the disintegration of the black dyed fabric but it was being used and loved. Last fall, before Thanksgiving, the quilt was left on the bed. Mice climbed under the tarpaulin protecting it, decided wool would make a great nest and chewed the fabric. It needed to be repaired. Great grandmother would not be happy.

Eliza Jane wasn’t just a quilter, she also knit and made a finely worked afghan. This was a work of love made from off white wool purchased especially for the project. It was given to her daughter Minnie. Elisa Jane was very upset to see that her daughter used it folded up under a mattress, to raise the head of a bed. It was the only time her granddaughter Beth remembered seeing her grandmother cry. The afghan then went to Beth and later her great-granddaughter Dorothy, who proudly displayed it on her guest bed. Great grandmother would be happy.

Eliza Jane also did a lot of fancy needlework. Needlepoint book marks, crocheted towels and lace, crossed stitched sayings on paper and tatted edging have all been preserved. She loved listening to the radio,“Wilson came over on Wed evening and looked over our machine it needs a new long battery but I heard a fine concert in Masonic Hall last night the best yet after the shaking up he gave the old battery.” I can picture her sitting listening in the evening, her hands never idle.

Eliza married William Eagle in 1881, when they were both considered “older”. He had been looking after his mother and didn’t want his wife to become a nurse. They did marry before Martha McClelland Eagle died, as they couldn’t wait forever. Eliza’s wedding dress was a burgundy silk because she thought cream or white wasn’t suitable for a woman then 36 years of age. I don’t know if she made the dress but it was kept for many years and worn for dress up by her daughters and granddaughters.

Neither her daughters nor her granddaughters were much for sewing or handiwork. My grandmother, Minnie could do some mending and darn her stockings but she was never into fine sewing. She had a dressmaker come to her house twice a year to make her clothes. Her sister Amy tried to do some sewing but for her it was a task, not something she enjoyed. So, I think Eliza Jane would be pleased to know that some of her great granddaughters do a lot of needle work and appreciate her craft.

With some old fabric saved from my mother’s hall closet, I repaired the major holes in the wool quilt. This summer it was back on the day bed. I think Great Grandmother would be happy.

Bibliography:

Personal communication with Beth Sutherland Van Loben Sels in 2000.

Notes written by Minnie Eagle Sutherland,“Mother made these fancy articles” and Amy Eagle.

Letters from Eliza Jane Eagle to Minnie Eagle Sutherland -1920’s.

Letter Feb 8 1924 from Eliza Jane to Minnie. Wilson was her daughter Minnie’s brother -in-law.

Articles in the possession of the author

Researching French Canadian Ancestors through the Drouin Institute

Institut Généalogique Drouin

 http://www.institutdrouin.com

450-448-1251

Institut.drouin@gmail.com

 If you are researching French Canadian ancestors, the best place to look is the Drouin Institute, www.drouininstitute.com. The institute can help you find a great deal of information about your ancestors, but only some pages are in English and you may become confused because there are several different ways to access the site’s information.

In addition to the subscription database at https://www.genealogiequebec.com/en/, the institute has a vast selection of publications for sale through its bookstore.

You will find the link to subscribe to the institute’s online database, Quebec Records, at the top of the page www.genealogiequebec.com/en/ or, if you are on the French-language page, click on abonnement.

The Quebec Records collection, updated as of February 2016, includes more than 42 million files and images. Take a look at the About Us page (https://www.genealogiequebec.com/en/about) to get an idea of the scope of information available. It includes the Lafrance Collection of Catholic baptisms, marriages and deaths starting from 1621, and some Protestant marriages, 1760-1849. The online Drouin Collection includes a variety of genealogical records from Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick. Scroll down the About page to see the listing of additional databases, including notarized documents and obituaries.

The Quebec Records page has a link to the PRDH project, or Research Program in Historical Demography, http://www.genealogie.umontreal.ca/en/home. This huge undertaking by the University of Montreal put together all Catholic baptisms, marriages and burials, as well as Protestant marriages, in Quebec from 1621 to 1849.

According to the project’s website (http://www.genealogie.umontreal.ca/en/LePrdh) the result is “a computerized population register, composed of biographical files on all individuals of European ancestry who lived in the St. Lawrence Valley. The file for each individual gives the date and place of birth, marriage(s), and death, as well as family and conjugal ties with other individuals. This basic information is complemented by various socio-demographic characteristics drawn from documents: socio-professional status and occupation, ability to sign his or her name, place of residence, and, for immigrants, place of origin.” The PRDH site includes an extensive bibliography. Subscription rates depend on whether you live in Quebec, the rest of Canada or elsewhere.

The Drouin Institute sells a number of products through its online boutique. For example, you can buy family histories on CD through https://institut-drouin.myshopify.com/collections/patrimoine-familial (search for your family’s name in the naviguer box on the right), or you can purchase published family history books at https://institut-drouin.myshopify.com/collections/patrimoine-familial. Almost all of these products are in French.

The page http://www.drouininstitute.com/index.html links to the online boutique. On that page (https://institut-drouin.myshopify.com/search) you can put your family name into the search box and it will tell you what products, including CDs, books, spiral binders and PDFs, can be ordered.

Another way to search this resource is to go to www.institutdrouin.com/neufs. This page will lead you to a long list of product numbers. Click on each selection to see what titles are available.

Here are some of the spiral binders you can buy from the institute containing records that Montreal genealogist Jacques Gagné says are not available through commercial databases:

Item # N-0076 –RawdonSt. Patrick Catholic Parish – Montcalm County – Marriages, baptisms, deaths (1837-1987) – Parish later renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde de Rawdon > Spiral binders $55. + taxes-shipping

Item # N-0278 – Iberville County – Protestant & Catholic Marriages (1823-1979) – Towns of: Henryville – Iberville – Mont-St-Grégoire – St-Alexandre – St-Athanase – Ste-Anne-de-Sabravois – Ste-Brigite-d’Iberville – St-Grégoire-le-Grand – St-Sébastien – Ste-Angèle-de-Monnoir – 802 pages – 2 volumes > Spiral binders $75. + taxes-shipping

Item # N-0327 – Trois-RivièresSt. Patrick Irish Catholic ParishMarriages (1955-1981) > Spiral binders $10. + taxes-shipping

Item # N-0504 – Terrebonne Judicial District Civil Marriages – (1969-1991) – 8,900 marriages – 684 pages > Spiral binders $69. + taxes-shipping

Item # N-0578 – St. Lawrence River’s Mid North ShoreMoyenne Côte-Nord du St-Laurent Judicial District of Sept-IlesMarriages (1846-1987) – 10,342 marriages – Towns of : Sept-Iles – Port-Cartier – Clarke City – Godbout – Gallix – Baie-Trinité – Rivière-Brochu – Franquelin – Moisie – Rivière-Pentecôte – Pointe-aux-Anglais – 607 pages > Spiral binders $43. + taxes-shipping

Item # N-0579 – St. Lawrence River’s Lower North Shore &  Southern LabradorBasse Côte-Nord du St-Laurent et du Sud du LabradorProtestant & Catholic marriages, baptisms, deaths (1847-2006) – 6,470 marriagesRegion of Minganie – Aguanish – Baie Johan Beetz – Hâvre-St-Pierre – Anticosti Island – Longue Pointe de Mingan – Mingan – Natashquan – Pointe-Parent – Rivière-au-Tonnerre – Rivière-St-Jean – Region of Lower North-Shore – Aylmer Sound – Blanc Sablon – Chevery – Harrington Harbour – Kegaska – La Romaine – La Tabatière – Lourdes de Blanc Sablon – Musquaro – Mutton Bay – Pakua-Shipi – Rivière St-Paul – St-Augustin (St. Augustine) – Tête a la Baleine – Region of Southern Labrador – Capstan Island – Clear Bay (L’Anse-au-Clair) – East St. Modest (e) – Flower’s Cove – Forteau – L’Anse-au-Loup (Woolf Cove) – L’Anse-Amour – Pinware – Red Bay – Sheldrake – West St. Modest (e) – Catholic Parishes (17) – Anglican Church (4) – United Church (2) – Methodist Church (1) – Congregationalist Church (1) – Plymouth Brethern (Gospel Hall) (3) – Pentecostal (1) – The church records of the Presbyterian Church in Harrington Harbour were destroyed by fire in 1973 – 330 pages > Spiral binders $28. + taxes-shipping

Item # N-0585 – St. Lawrence’s River Upper North Shore –  Haute-Côte-Nord du St-LaurentMarriages (1668-1992) – 17,689 marriages – Towns of: Baie-Comeau – Forestville – Les Escoumins – Tadoussac – Chutes-aux-Ouardes – Ragueneau – Pointe-Lebel – Betsiamites – Bersimis – Les Bergeronnes – Les Ilets Jéramie – 576 pages > $40. + taxes-shipping

Item # N-0613 – Gardenville Presbyterian Church & United Church of LongueilGreenfield ParkLongueilMarriages, baptisms, deaths (1905-1925 & 1926-1941) – 77 pages > $35. + taxes-shipping

Researched and compiled by Jacques Gagné gagne.jacques@sympatico.ca

The Cook at the McGill University Faculty Club

by Sandra McHugh

I particularly like the series Downton Abbey.  It portrays the upstairs and downstairs of the upper classes during the beginning of the twentieth century. I like to imagine what it would have been like to work as part of the domestic staff.  In 1922, my grandmother, Grace Graham Hunter, worked as a domestic, probably a cook, in Edinburgh for Dr. W. Kelman MacDonald, an osteopath.1 She was young and unmarried and looking for adventure.

Her experience as a cook in one of the homes of the upper class of Edinburgh surely stood her in good stead when she became head cook at the McGill University Faculty Club in Montreal.  When my grandmother was looking for adventure, Canada badly needed domestic workers.  The Canadian government favoured immigrants from Great Britain to ensure the predominance of British values.  The British Parliament passed the Empire Settlement Act, which entitled my grandmother to free third-class passage from Scotland to Canada.2

Given that the need for domestic workers was acute, government hostels, partially financed by both the Canadian government and the provinces, welcomed these immigrants to the major urban centres of Canada and referred them to Employment Services of Canada who then found them employment.3

The McGill University Faculty Club was established in 1923. I assume that my grandmother was one of the first employees as this is the year she met my grandfather and she used to tell me stories of letting him come in the back door to eat a dessert or two.

My grandmother also used to tell me many stories of the people who were members of the Faculty Club and their guests and of the pressure of preparing the food just right. I used to wonder about the famous people who dined there, who they shared their meals with, and what they discussed.

The Faculty Club was originally located on University Street.  It was only in 1935 that it was moved to its current location in the Baumgarten House on McTavish Street, the former resident of Sir Arthur Currie. 4 It was only when it moved that the Faculty Club allowed women members.  Notably, Maude Abbott became the first woman member of the Faculty Club.  She was a remarkable Montreal citizen.  She started practising medicine in 1894.  In 1910, McGill University awarded her an honorary degree and a lectureship in the Department of Pathology.5 In 1924, she founded the Federation of Medical Women of Canada. 6 Somehow, it seems fitting that such an extraordinary woman should be the first woman member of the McGill University Faculty Club.

 

1 This is derived from my grandmother’s address on the passenger list of the S.S. Montclare that sailed from Greenock, Scotland to Saint-John, New Brunswick on February 16, 1922.  Her address was listed as 41 Drumshegh Gardens, Edinburgh.  Dr. W. Kelman MacDonald, Osteopath, is listed as the owner linked to architectural drawings of work that was done in 1922. As my grandmother’s job was a domestic, I assume that she worked for Dr. MacDonald.

2Immigration Form 30-A of Grace Graham Hunter.

3 Crawford, Ruth, 1924, “Canada’s Program for Assimilation”, The Rotarian, May 1924, p. 16

4https://www.mcgill.ca/facultyclub/history

5https://www.mcgill.ca/about/history/features/mcgill-women

6https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maude_Abbott

 

Surgeon and Mentalist

Shortly before graduation from medical school at Queens University in Kingston, Ontario in 1883, William G. Anglin (my great grandfather) and a few fellow medical students attended the performance of a “thought-reader”, English mentalist Stuart Cumberland[1]. So impressed with what they had seen, they went back to their place and tried one of the simpler experiments.

 The operator was blindfolded, and the Medium, placing the back of the fingers of one hand on the operator’s forehead was to think intently as to what was required to be done. For instance – pick up an article from some position and place it in another position – the operator having previously gone out of the room while the experiment was being agreed upon. Everyone singly failed, and I was the last one to try. Immediately I went across the room and picked up a small object from the mantelpiece – crossed the room and placed it on the middle of a chair. Tore off the handkerchief from my eyes and said: “That’s what you wanted done”. “By George, you’re right, Anglin, we will try you again”, and I did correctly five or six other experiments – each a little more difficult than the last. Could not account for the success, but in every experiment I was conscious that I was doing the right thing. When my fingers touched the desired object, I closed on it with a feeling of certainty.[2]

The next week William left for Halifax to sail for Liverpool to continue his medical studies in England. He met a fellow doctor and, eventually the conversation turned to “thought-reading”.

It proved to be a very entertaining voyage for the passengers, as he successfully performed time and time again. A passenger would say – “Well, Doctor, I hid a pin somewhere on the ship – an hour ago” and blindfolded, William would take the passenger’s right hand and, holding the fingers to his forehead, he would say, “Think where it is”, and they would start upstairs and downstairs, and along corridors to the spot, and he would pick up the pin from a curtain or a chair wherever it had been placed.[3]

Later in life, his son Douglas, referring to his father’s diary, lamented “End of Diary – too bad – I wish we could have heard about my father’s time studying in London and Edinburgh, where he was entertained at many high society places on account of his thought-reading.”[4]

Following his medical degree from Queen’s in 1883, William spent eighteen months as the house surgeon at the Royal Infirmary, the Sick Children’s Hospital, and the Royal Maternity Hospital in England. Then he successfully completed the M.R.C.S. exam (Member of the Royal College of Surgeons) in England.

When he returned to Kingston, in the fall of 1885, he lectured for a session in surgery at the Women’s Medical College. A year later, he became Professor of Pathology and finally head of the department of Clinical Surgery.

Around that time, William built an addition to his parents’ home at 52 Earl Street in Kingston, which provided him with both office and home. 3

This is where he brought his childhood sweetheart and bride, Harriet (Hattie) Eva Gould, in 1886. The name ‘Dr. Anglin’ remains embossed in the upper portion of the glass of the front window to this day.[5]

He remained a member of the Medical Staff at Queen’s until May 1915 when he departed with the Queen’s Stationary Hospital for Cairo, at age 59. Cairo, Egypt - Dec 7, 1915 - Lt Col AnglinHe served as a civil-surgeon with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel until 1916 when he became ill with Malta fever and phlebitis. He was given a medical discharge and sent back home.

William’s attestation papers, dated May 1st 1915, declared that he was fit for duty but noted a missing middle finger on his right hand.  In 1904, it was reported that Dr. William G. Anglin was severely ill, and lost a finger due to this illness. There was much relief when it was announced that he would live.[6] Middle Finger The story told was that by using his “thought-reading” skills, he was able to physically draw down the infection in his right arm to his middle finger. The amputation of that one finger removed all traces of infection from his body probably saving his life… and enabling him to continue his work as a surgeon.[7]

 

 

 

[1] Wikipedia-Stuart Cumberland (1857–1922) English mentalist known for his demonstrations of “thought reading”.

[2] Personal recollections – W.G. Anglin, 52 Earl Street, Kindston, Ontario – November 14, 1927

[3] Personal recollections – W. G.Anglin, 52 Earl Street, Kingston, Ontario – November 14, 1927

[4] Written note from Douglas Anglin at the end of Personal recollections – W.G. Anglin, 52 Earl Street, Kingson, Ontario – November 14, 1927.

[5] Helen Finlay, owner-operator of  52 Earl Street Cottages, Kingston, Ontario

[6] The Kingston Whig, January 12, 1904,

Queen’s archives, Biographical History – Anglin, William Gardiner (1856-1934)

[7] As told to Lucy Anglin from Thomas Gill Anglin, grandson of W.G. Anglin, who read his grandfather’s diary

 

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