Category Archives: Genealogy

Sisu, Saunas and Ida Susanna

oldsauna

The Webster dictionary gives the following definitions of sauna:   A Finnish steam bath is a room in which steam is provided by water thrown on hot stones.   The sauna is a small room or hut heated to around 80 degrees Celsius.  It is used for bathing as well as for mental and physical relaxation.

There was a time, in the not too distance past when there were more saunas in Finland than there were cars.

*****

On a bright sunny morning in southern California, the week before Christmas 1967  at the age of eighty-one, Ida Susanna decided to enjoy what had long ago become a ritual. The sauna had been heated. It was ready. She and several family members were enjoying the heat, steam, warmth and comfort of the sauna when suddenly Ida began feeling uneasy and within a short time she succumbed on the spot, right then and there. Her last breath was in her beloved sauna, a Finnish tradition she had enjoyed throughout her life. Now, she had come full circle.

Ida Susanna Karhu drew her first breath and saw the light of day in a sauna on a cold morning in the dead of winter, March 12, 1886, in the rural village of Isokyro, on the banks of the River Kyro, in Western Finland, the Ostrobothnia Region,  where St. Laurence Church built in 1304 still stands to this day, twenty minutes from Vaasa, Finland near the Gulf of Bothnia.

As a youngster,  she played with friends and watched her younger brother and sister. She went to school and dreamed of a new life in a far-away country where her father was waiting for the family. Johan had left for America several months earlier. At that time the United States was actively recruiting immigrants. He was up to the challenge.

The time had finally come for the family to be reunited. In early spring of 1896 Ida, her mother, Sanna, 42, her brother Jakko and sister Lisa Whilemena, had taken all the necessary steps toward making their way to ‘Amerika’. The Finnish passport containing all four names was in order, having undergone rigorous scrutiny prior to being issued. Four tickets were purchased at the cost of FIM 138 per passenger. The date for departure had been set for May 16, 1896.

It must have been a harrowing thirteen-day voyage for Sanna, with the responsibility of three young children although Ida was able to help with the little ones. They made their way to Hango, Finland on to Hull, England, aboard the SS Urania, then by train to Liverpool, England. The travellers then boarded the SS Lucania, a Cunard Liner, destination New York City with two thousand eager passengers. Some were either homesick or seasick or both.

They passed the Statue of Liberty as they approached Ellis Island on May 29, 1896, where the lengthy registration process began before they could go down the ‘stairway to freedom’.

There were new horizons for the ten year  Ida,  and her family as they  made their way to Ashtabula, Ohio. She went to school, was a diligent student who learned to read and write in English while maintaining her Finnish language and heritage. In 1903 at the age of sixteen, she married a fellow Finn, nine years her senior, had nine children. Johan (John) provided for the family for forty years until he was fatally struck in the spring of 1943 by a young fellow driving a forklift. After his passing Ida had several suitors. She remarried,

In 1903 at the age of sixteen, she married a fellow Finn, nine years her senior, had nine children. Johan (John) provided for the family for forty years until he was fatally struck in the spring of 1943 by a young fellow driving a forklift. After his passing Ida had several suitors. She remarried, however, her new husband, Herman Haapala died within the year.

Ida Susanna was a lady with sisu*, a Finnish word for perseverance, courage and determination. She married for the third time to a gentleman named Gust Gustafson and enjoyed several years living on a large farm in Cook, Minnesota. For almost ten years they travelled., One summer they visited her son in Canada, and wintered in Florida. However, he too passed away.

Getting on in years and not wanting to endure the harsh winters in the east, she made her way to southern California where she spent her remaining years close to several of her children and their families.

She lived life to the fullest throughout those many years in “Amerika” her adopted country and is buried beside her first love, her husband of forty years, Johan Hjalmar Lindell, in  Edgewood Cemetery in Ashtabula, Ohio.

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*Sisu is a Finnish term and when loosely translated into English signifies strength of will, determination, perseverance, and acting rationally in the face of adversity. However, the word is widely considered to lack a proper translation into any other language. Sisu has been described as being integral to understanding Finnish culture. The literal meaning is equivalent in English to “having guts”, and the word derives from sisus, which means something inner or interior. However sisu is defined by a long-term element in it; it is not momentary courage, but the ability to sustain an action against the odds. Deciding on a course of action and then sticking to that decision against repeated failures is sisu.

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The Dovecotes of Tinos

By Sandra McHugh

I have lucked out. My husband comes from the island of Tinos, Greece and we go there every year. I am always struck with the breathtaking beauty of the island. Some villages nestle in the valleys and others perch on the hillsides. The hills are terraced with stone walls and sheep, goats, and cows graze in the fields. Tinos may resemble other islands in the Cyclades, but what is unique to Tinos is the number of dovecotes scattered across the landscape. If you were to visit Tinos, you would be astonished at how many of them there are. While the exact number of them is not known, it is believed that there are over 1,000. This is quite impressive for an island that is 195 square kilometers. 1

They are truly beautiful as you can see in these photographs below.  This dovecote used to belong to my husband’s grandfather.

Antonios' dovecote

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Dovecotes are not just decoration. During the 1900s, dovecotes significantly contributed to the family finances. They were kept in the family and passed on from generation to generation. My husband inherited a dovecote from his father, who had inherited it from his uncle. While very few people eat dove today, my husband remembers his grandmother serving dove, more specifically in soups made with the meat and carcass of the doves. Most importantly, the family also used the dove droppings as manure. The droppings were well known as high quality fertilizer.

Here Is a picture of my husband’s dovecote, nestled in the valley.

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It was the Venetians who originally introduced breeding of doves to the island of Tinos when they conquered the island in 1204. They ruled the island for five centuries until 1715. During Venetian rule, dove breeding was only practised by the noble, or ruling classes. The noble families had ‘le droit des colombiers’ or the right to possess doves. These were concessions bestowed by the Doge of Venice.  In 1715, the Turks ruled the island, but did not inhabit it. The island was returned to Greece in 1821. 2

Most of the dovecotes were built during the 17th and 18th centuries. During this time, dove meat was not limited to local consumption. It was considered a delicacy and exported as far as Smyrna and Constantinople.

When the Venetians ceased to rule Tinos, concessions to practice dove breeding were no longer necessary. The inhabitants started to build their own dovecotes. They were built in areas conducive to breeding, such as rural areas near cultivated fields and where a water supply was available. 4 They were built on slopes that took into consideration the wind and would allow the doves to fly easily in and out of the dovecotes. The doves nest in the square holes built in a single or double row. Small stone slabs that protrude provide perches for the doves. 5

Here is a picture of some doves nesting and some eggs.

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Dovecotes are made out of slate clay and are whitewashed. They are two stories high. The doves live on the second floor and the first floor is used for storing tools and agricultural equipment. They are elaborately decorated with geometric patterns and non-geometric patterns such as cypress trees. It is believed that these patterns attract the doves. 6

Here is a close up picture of my husband’s dovecote. These doves are fed and their only predators are snakes. There are about 30 doves living in this dovecote at any one time. We know approximately how many doves are living here by counting them in a picture.  There is great pleasure in continuing to breed doves, a practice that has lasted centuries.

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1 https://tinos360.gr/paradosi_eng.html

2 Author not identified, PDF document entitled Dovecotes of Tinos in Archnet.org

3 https://tinos360.gr/paradosi_eng.html

4 http://www.greeka.com/cyclades/tinos/tinos-other/tinos-dovecotes.htm

5 https://tinos360.gr/paradosi_eng.html

6 http://www.greeka.com/cyclades/tinos/tinos-other/tinos-dovecotes.htm

 

Church Registers: A Wonderful Resource for Researching Quebec Ancestors

Quebec’s Church Registers are a happy fact for anyone researching ancestors in that Canadian province.

From the early days of New France in the 17th century, a record was kept for every Catholic birth, marriage and death with a register. Priests kept a religious copy of the register at the parish and filed another state copy with the tribunal serving the relevant territory.

After the British Conquest in 1760, the right to keep registers of civil status was gradually extended – over the next century – to non-Catholics. At present, BANQ’s Church Register collection contains the digitized records of births, marriages and deaths for Catholic, Anglican, Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist, Evangelical, Jewish and Lutheran churches.*

Today, these records can be accessed through the Drouin Institute, Ancestry.com,

as well as through BAnQ (the National Library and Archives of Quebec) http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna/ecivil/as

and familysearch.org: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1321742

The BANQ website is available in French but the above link will take you directly the Church Registry page. Records can be accessed in three ways: by the place where the act was established (parish, congregation, synagogue, etc); by the judicial district, according to the list established by the Territorial Division Act (L.R.Q., chapter D-11);or by region.

To consult the registers, select one of the headings on the left side of the screen. To display the pages in large format (PDF format, image mode) click on the headings for the desired pages. *

(*Information translated from the French on BAnQ website.)

What will you find at the BANQ Online Church Registers 1768-1912

Protestant churches – English – 686 churches

Jewish Synagogues – 20 synagogues

Protestant churches – French – 28 churches

Catholic parishes – French & English – 1,027 churches

Catholic parishes – Italian & others – 15 churches

Catholic missions – French & English – 8 missions

Catholic Religious Communities – 18 convents

Hospitals (French & English) – 12 medical centers

Hospices – (French & English) – 5 institutions

Psychiatric hospitals (Asylums) –3 institutions

 

BAnQ and Family Search

Civil Registers (Parish Registers)

Catholic & Protestant Churches

Civil Registers (Parish Registers)

1621 to 1916

Births (baptisms), marriages, deaths

http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna/ecivil/

© Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec

 

BAnQ Catholic & Protestant Church Registers & Jewish Synagogue Registers

http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna/ecivil/

By Churches (Catholic or Protestant) or Synagogues

A to F

 

A Date District Cote
  Abbott’s Corner Baptist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S54
  Abenakis Anglican Church 1867-1912 Richelieu CE603,S15
  Acton Vale Anglican Church 1864-1912 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S29
  Adamsville Anglican Church 1876-1899 Bedford CE502,S32
  Advent Christian Adventist Church, Beebe Plain 1878-1907 Saint-François CE501,S29
  Advent Christian Adventist Church, Danville 1857-1908 Saint-François CE501,S30
  Adventist Christian Church, Hatley 1899-1908 Saint-François CE501,S169
  Agnes Methodist Church 1900-1902 Mégantic CE503,S2
  All Saints Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S38
  All Saints Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S211
  All Saints Anglican Church of Hereford 1900-1904 Saint-François CE501,S123
  Alleyn Township Church of England 1898-1912 Pontiac CE702,S15
  American Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S115
  Amherst Park Congregational Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S257
  Angers Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S57
  Anglican Church (Pointe-au-Pic, Murray Bay, Cap-à-l’Aigle, Tadoussac) 1912 Saguenay CE304,S18
  Anglican St-Mathieu Peninsula 1893-1912 Gaspé CE102,S26
  Arundel Methodist Church 1900-1911 Terrebonne CE606,S39
  Arundel Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S51
  Asbestos Anglican Church 1910-1911 Saint-François CE501,S181
  Ascot Anglican Church 1824-1832 Saint-François CE501,S32
  Athelstane and Elgin Presbyterian Church 1899-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S48
  Avoca and Harrington Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S52
  Avoca Baptist Church 1911-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S95
  Ayer’s Cliff Congregational Church 1892-1908 Saint-François CE501,S135
  Aylmer Anglican Christ’s Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S44
  Aylmer Methodist Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S53
  Aylmer Presbyterian Church 1899-1912 Hull CE701,S37
  Aylwin Anglican Church 1900-1912 Labelle CE610,S11
B Date District Cote
  B’nai Jacob Synagogue 1898-1912 Montréal CE601,S197
  B’Nai Jacob Synagogue 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S268
  Bais David Synagogue 1900-1911 Montréal CE601,S199
  Baldwin’s Mills Methodist Church 1898-1899 Saint-François CE501,S136
  Barford Baptist Calvinist Church 1842 Saint-François CE501,S52
  Barnston Baptist Calvinist Church 1843-1864 Saint-François CE501,S53
  Barnston Baptist Church 1857-1908 Saint-François CE501,S50
  Barnston Baptist Free-Will Church 1838-1870 Saint-François CE501,S56
  Barnston Methodist Church 1854-1908 Saint-François CE501,S73
  Beach Ridge Presbyterian Church 1901-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S58
  Beauharnois and Chateauguay Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S53
  Bedford Anglican Church 1832-1899 Bedford CE502,S50
  Bedford Methodist Church 1876-1899 Bedford CE502,S71
  Bedford United Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S32
  Beebe Baptist Church 1901-1906 Saint-François CE501,S170
  Beebe Plain Methodist Church 1879-1908 Saint-François CE501,S137
  Beth David Roumanian, Shaare Teffilah Austrian, Beth Judah Kehel Yeshurun Galician Synagogue 1910-1911 Montréal CE601,S304
  Beth Isaac Beth Yitzchock Synagogue 1909 Montréal CE601,S288
  Beth Israel Synagogue 1903-1912 Montréal CE601,S266
  Beth Jehuda Ohel Moske Synagogue 1906-1912 Montréal CE601,S267
  Bethleem Congregational Church 1900-1911 Montréal CE601,S191
  Birchton Methodist Church 1902-1908 Saint-François CE501,S171
  Bolton-Est Anglican Church 1868-1899 Bedford CE502,S33
  Bolton-Est Baptist Church 1861-1869 Bedford CE502,S56
  Bolton-Est Methodist Church 1837-1879 Bedford CE502,S72
  Boscobel Anglican Church 1864-1899 Bedford CE502,S39
  Brigham Farnham Congregational United Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S60
  Bristol Township Presbyterian Church 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S34
  Brome Anglican Church 1842-1879 Bedford CE502,S34
  Brome Corner Anglican Church 1877-1884 Bedford CE502,S36
  Brome West Methodist Baptist Church 1900-1905 Bedford CE611,S61
  Brompton and Windsor Anglican Church 1874-1912 Saint-François CE501,S49
  Brookbury Adventist Church 1900-1901 Saint-François CE501,S113
  Bryson Presbyterian Church 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S33
  Buckingham Baptist Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S33
  Bury Anglican Church 1838-1912 Saint-François CE501,S34
  Bury Methodist Church 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S172
C Date District Cote
  Calvary Congregational Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S149
  Calvin Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S116
  Campbell’s Bay Methodist Church 1904-1910 Pontiac CE702,S11
  Cap-aux-Os Methodist Church of Canada 1901-1911 Gaspé CE102,S27
  Caughnawaga Methodist Church 1902-1912 Montréal CE601,S203
  Centenary Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S99
  Centenary Methodist Church of Stanstead Plain 1831-1908 Saint-François CE501,S86
  Chalmers Presbyterian Church 1831-1913 Québec CE301,S67
  Chalmers Presbyterian Church 1900-1909 Montréal CE601,S117
  Chalmers Presbyterian Church, Richmond 1877-1908 Saint-François CE501,S91
  Chambly Methodist Church 1911-1912 Longueuil CE608,S2
  Chelsea Church of England 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S42
  Chelsea Methodist Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S54
  Chelsea Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S43
  Chevra Shaas Adath Jeshurun Hadrath Kodesh Synagogue 1902-1912 Montréal CE601,S269
  Chevra Thilim Synagogue 1908-1912 Montréal CE601,S153
  Chicoutimi Anglican mission church 1904-1912 Chicoutimi CE201,S26
  Christ Anglican Church of East Angus 1900-1912 Saint-François CE501,S122
  Christ Anglican Church of Stanstead 1857-1912 Saint-François CE501,S48
  Christ Church Anglican 1820-1912 Joliette CE605,S44
  Christ Church Anglican 1784-1912 Richelieu CE603,S16
  Christ Church Anglican 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S63
  Christieville Anglican Church 1900-1912 Iberville CE604,S18
  Church of Christ 1906-1907 Montréal CE601,S260
  Church of England, Mission of Malbaie, Corner beach and Barachois 1885-1912 Gaspé CE102,S39
  Church of the Advent of Sherbrooke 1912 Saint-François CE501,S126
  Church of the Epiphany of Way’s Mills 1900-1912 Saint-François CE501,S121
  Church of the Seventh Day Adventists, Stanstead 1900-1904 Saint-François CE501,S161
  Clarenceville Anglican Church 1852-1879 Bedford CE502,S45
  Clarenceville Free Methodist Church 1901-1909 Bedford CE611,S63
  Clarenceville Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S77
  Clarenceville United Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S64
  Clarendon Township et Vicinity Baptist Church 1895-1912 Pontiac CE702,S21
  Clarendon Township Methodist Church 1902-1912 Pontiac CE702,S23
  Coaticook Adventist Church 1904-1905 Saint-François CE501,S114
  Coaticook Baptist Church 1875-1908 Saint-François CE501,S51
  Coaticook Methodist Church 1880-1908 Saint-François CE501,S139
  Compton Methodist Church 1838-1908 Saint-François CE501,S75
  Cookshire Methodist Church 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S140
  Cookshire Presbyterian Church 1815-1822 Saint-François CE501,S88
  Côte des Neiges Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S118
  Côte St. Paul Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S111
  Coteau-du-Lac Anglican Church 1894-1910 Montréal CE601,S64
  Cowansville and Brome Congregational Church 1843-1879 Bedford CE502,S67
  Cowansville Anglican Church 1854-1899 Bedford CE502,S37
  Cowansville Methodist Church 1877-1899 Bedford CE502,S76
  Cowansville Methodist United Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S37
  Cowansville United Congregational Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S101
  Crescent Street Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S120
  Cross Point Escuminac Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Bonaventure CE103,S20
  Cusham Memorial Zion Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S38
 

D Date District Cote
  Dalesville Baptist Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S71
  Danville Baptist Free-Will Church 1861-1873 Saint-François CE501,S61
  Danville Congregational Church 1835-1908 Saint-François CE501,S70
  Danville Methodist Church 1818-1908 Saint-François CE501,S85
  Danville Presbyterian Church 1873-1908 Saint-François CE501,S93
  Desrivières Street Methodist Church 1903-1910 Montréal CE601,S204
  Dixville Baptist Church 1865-1907 Saint-François CE501,S63
  Dominion Square Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S101
  Dorchester Street Methodist Church 1900-1908 Montréal CE601,S228
  Douglas Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S155
  Drummondville Protestant Episcopal Church 1824-1856 Arthabaska CE402,S74
  Dundee Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S60
  Dunham Adventist Church 1866-1868 Bedford CE502,S25
  Dunham Anglican Church 1808-1897 Bedford CE502,S38
  Dunham Baptist Church 1858-1860 Bedford CE502,S57
  Dunham Circuit Methodist Church 1820-1899 Bedford CE502,S77
  Dunham Methodist Wesleyan New Connexion Church 1846-1874 Bedford CE502,S74
  Dunham Stanbridge Evangelical Second Advent Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S92
  Dunham Stanbridge Methodist United Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S65
  Dunkin Adventist Church 1881-1899 Bedford CE502,S99
  Dunkin Evangelical Second Advent Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S66
  Durham Anglican Church of the Holy Trinity 1875-1912 Drummond CE403,S19
  Durham Congregational Society Church 1875-1910 Drummond CE403,S21
  Durham United Church of England and Ireland 1880-1893 Drummond CE403,S20
  Durham Wesleyan Methodist Church 1875-1912 Drummond CE403,S22
E Date District Cote
  Eardley Township Church of England 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S36
  East Angus Methodist Church 1901-1908 Saint-François CE501,S173
  East Bolton Methodist United Church 1900-1911 Bedford CE611,S58
  East End Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S102
  East Farnham Adventist Church 1877-1887 Bedford CE502,S26
  East Farnham Baptist Free-Will Church 1862-1879 Bedford CE502,S66
  East Farnham Monthly Meeting Friends Church 1900-1903 Bedford CE611,S69
  East Farnham Monthly Meeting of Friends (Quakers) Church 1861-1879 Bedford CE502,S94
  East Templeton Township Baptist Church 1898-1910 Hull CE701,S50
  Eaton Baptist Calvinist Church 1842-1872 Saint-François CE501,S54
  Eaton Baptist Free-Will Church 1838-1871 Saint-François CE501,S58
  Eaton Congregational Church 1838-1901 Saint-François CE501,S64
  Eaton Methodist Circuit 1852-1905 Saint-François CE501,S77
  Ebenezer Methodist Church 1900-1911 Montréal CE601,S206
  Edwardston, Havelock Anglican Church 1900-1904 Beauharnois CE607,S77
  Edwardstown Anglican Church 1903-1904 Beauharnois CE607,S64
  Église anglicane du Rédempteur 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S183
  Église Baptiste canadienne française de Québec 1909-1912 Québec CE301,S138
  Église baptiste de La-Grande-Ligne-de-L’Acadie 1900-1912 Iberville CE604,S33
  Église Baptiste française de Montréal 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S87
  Eglise Baptiste Française dite calviniste de Maskinongé 1901-1906 Trois-Rivières CE401,S57
  Église congrégationalistede Saint-François-de-Sales 1839-1865 Richelieu CE603,S18
  Église évangélique baptiste de Saint-Pie 1845-1912 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S34
  Église évangélique baptiste de Sainte-Marie-de-Monnoir 1853-1912 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S33
  Église évangélique de Joliette 1866-1880 Joliette CE605,S47
  Église évangélique de Saint-Hyacinthe 1870-1871 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S36
  Église méthodiste d’Acton Vale 1863-1912 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S35
  Église méthodiste du Lac-des-Îles 1908-1912 Labelle CE610,S30
  Eglise Presbytérienne Chicoutimi 1871-1876 Chicoutimi CE201,S9
  Église presbytérienne de Belle Rivière 1900-1911 Terrebonne CE606,S36
  Église presbytérienne de Joliette 1910-1911 Joliette CE605,S48
  Église presbytérienne de Pointe-aux-Trembles 1900-1911 Montréal CE601,S219
  Église presbytérienne de Port-au-Persil 1907-1912 Saguenay CE304,S16
  Église presbytérienne de Saint-Damase 1907-1912 Montmagny CE302,S40
  Église presbytérienne de Saint-Hyacinthe 1900-1912 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S43
  Église presbytérienne du Sauveur 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S151
  Église presbytérienne française de Masham 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S58
  Église presbytérienne française de Québec 1882-1911 Québec CE301,S123
  Église presbytérienne française Saint-Marc 1906-1912 Hull CE701,S63
  Emmanuel Congregational Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S91
  English River Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S65
  Erskine Presbyterian Church 1900-1911 Montréal CE601,S121
  Escuminac Methodist Church 1903-1909 Bonaventure CE103,S28
  Evangelical Lutheran Church 1882-1894 Québec CE301,S124
  Evangelical Lutherian Church of the Redeemer 1905-1912 Montréal CE601,S262
  Evangelique Baptiste, Roxton Pond 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S46
  Evangilismos Greek Orthodox Church 1907-1911 Montréal CE601,S263
F Date District Cote
  Fairmont Avenue Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S207
  Fairmount Presbyterian Church 1910-1912 Montréal CE601,S305
  Farnham Anglican Church 1847-1879 Bedford CE502,S40
  Farnham Centre Presbyterian Church 1860-1899 Bedford CE502,S92
  Farnham Centre Presbyterian Church 1900-1908 Bedford CE611,S68
  Farnham Methodist Church 1848-1899 Bedford CE502,S78
  Farnham Presbyterian Church 1887-1888 Bedford CE502,S110
  Farnham United Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S70
  First Baptist Church, Sherbrooke 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S133
  First Presbyterian Church 1910-1912 Montréal CE601,S306
  Fitch Bay Adventist Church 1871-1902 Saint-François CE501,S28
  Fitch Bay Adventist Seventh Church 1905 Saint-François CE501,S115
  Fitch Bay Congregational Church 1871-1908 Saint-François CE501,S65
  Fitch Bay Protestant Methodist Church 1872-1882 Saint-François CE501,S78
  Fort-Coulonge Methodist Church 1894-1910 Pontiac CE702,S19
  Fort-Coulonge Presbyterian Church 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S18
  Foster’s Bishop Carmichael Memorial Church et Bondville’s Christ Church of the Good Sheperd 1912 Bedford CE611,S103
  Frampton, Cranbourne, Standon and Buckland Anglican Church 1835-1910 Beauce CE306,S35
  Frampton, Leeds and Inverness Church of Scotland 1848 Beauce CE306,S38
  Franklin Centre Anglican Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S61
  Franklin Centre Congregational Church 1902-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S62
  Franklin Centre Methodist Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S63
  Frelighsburg Anglican Church 1808-1879 Bedford CE502,S47
  Frelighsburg Baptist Church 1850-1879 Bedford CE502,S104
  Frelighsburg Methodist Church 1864-1899 Bedford CE502,S79
  Frelighsburg United Baptist Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S72
  re G to L

G Date District Cote
  Garrison of Quebec Anglican Church 1797-1900 Québec CE301,S71
  General Hospital Anglican Church 1892-1912 Montréal CE601,S182
  Georgetown Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S66
  Georgeville Baptist Calvinist Church 1844-1872 Saint-François CE501,S55
  Georgeville Congregational Church 1854-1869 Saint-François CE501,S66
  Georgeville Methodist Church 1859-1908 Saint-François CE501,S79
  German and Polish Synagogue 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S96
  Glen Almond Anglican Church 1911-1912 Hull CE701,S68
  Glen Sutton Anglican Church 1876-1879 Bedford CE502,S41
  Good Shepherd Anglican Church 1909-1912 Montréal CE601,S286
  Gould Presbyterian Church 1849-1905 Saint-François CE501,S89
  Grace Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S48
  Grace Baptist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S189
  Grace Church Anglican 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S31
  Grace Church Anglican 1841-1912 Joliette CE605,S43
  Grace Church Anglican 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S66
  Granby Anglican Church 1843-1899 Bedford CE502,S42
  Granby Baptist Church 1872-1878 Bedford CE502,S59
  Granby Congregational Church 1842-1879 Bedford CE502,S68
  Granby Methodist Church 1857-1879 Bedford CE502,S80
  Granby United Congregational Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S74
  Granby United Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S41
  Grand-Mère Bethel Presbyterian Church 1901-1912 Saint-Maurice CE404,S22
  Grenville Baptist Church 1900-1911 Terrebonne CE606,S69
  Grenville Methodist Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S42
  Grenville Mission Presbyterian Churches 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S55
  Grosse-Île Anglican Church 1840-1903 Montmagny CE302,S11
  Grosse-Ile Anglican Church 1851-1912 Gaspé CE102,S5
H Date District Cote
  Hatley Baptist Free-Will Church 1842-1879 Saint-François CE501,S59
  Hatley Methodist Church 1860-1908 Saint-François CE501,S80
  Hatley Presbyterian Church 1886-1906 Saint-François CE501,S145
  Hemmingford Anglican Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S39
  Hemmingford Methodist Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S38
  Hendersonville Methodist Church 1900 Beauharnois CE607,S45
  High African American Methodist Episcopal Church 1909-1910 Montréal CE601,S290
  Hochelaga and Maisonneuve Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S272
  Holiness Movement, Havelock 1902-1903 Beauharnois CE607,S80
  Holiness Movement, Havelock (Covey Hill) 1899-1908 Beauharnois CE607,S79
  Holiness Movement Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S26
  Holiness Movement Church, Island Brook 1902-1905 Saint-François CE501,S162
  Holy Comforter Anglican Church of Ascot Corner 1876-1879 Saint-François CE501,S33
  Holy Trinity Anglican Cathedral 1768-1912 Québec CE301,S61
  Holy Trinity Anglican Church of Lévis 1827-1912 Québec CE301,S75
  House of Industry Refuge Anglican Institution 1908 Montréal CE601,S195
  Hudson Methodist Church 1882-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S44
  Hull Baptist Church 1904-1911 Hull CE701,S41
  Hull Western Methodist Church 1906-1907 Hull CE701,S55
  Huntingdon Anglican Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S32
  Huntingdon Methodist Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S33
  Huntingville Universalist Church 1844-1908 Saint-François CE501,S94
I Date District Cote
 
  Inspector Street Presbyterian Church 1908-1912 Montréal CE601,S156
  International Advent Christian Church, Hereford 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S160
  Inverness Anglican Church 1901-1912 Arthabaska CE305,S5
  Inverness Methodist Church 1901-1912 Arthabaska CE305,S7
  Inverness Presbyterian Church 1901-1912 Arthabaska CE305,S8
  Ireland Anglican Church 1901-1912 Arthabaska CE305,S9
  Iron Hill Adventist Church 1882-1899 Bedford CE502,S98
  Iron Hill Anglican Church 1863-1879 Bedford CE502,S35
  Iron Hill Holy Trinity Anglican Church 1900-1913 Bedford CE611,S76
  Iron Hill International Advent Christian Conference 1900-1913 Bedford CE611,S75
  Island Brook Methodist Church 1900-1903 Saint-François CE501,S141
  Italian Methodist Church 1909-1911 Montréal CE601,S291
  Italian Presbyterian Church 1907-1912 Montréal CE601,S276
J Date District Cote
  Johnville Anglican Church 1900-1912 Saint-François CE501,S124
K Date District Cote
  Kazabazua Presbyterian Church 1875-1912 Labelle CE610,S9
  Kazabazua-Aylwin Methodist Church 1900-1912 Labelle CE610,S7
  Kehal Jeshurun Synagogue 1904-1912 Montréal CE601,S270
  Kempt road-Broadlands-Sillarsville Presbyterian Church of Canada 1907-1912 Bonaventure CE103,S32
  Kennebec Road, Linière, Frampton and Cranbourne Presbyterian Church 1844-1912 Beauce CE306,S36
  Kensington Methodist Church 1901-1910 Beauharnois CE607,S81
  Kiever Shemerin Labeker Synagogue 1909-1910 Montréal CE601,S303
  Kingsbury Presbyterian Church 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S146
  Kingscroft Adventist Church 1891-1899 Saint-François CE501,S116
  Kingsey Baptist Church 1876-1888 Drummond CE403,S23
  Kingsey United Church of England and Ireland 1875-1912 Drummond CE403,S18
  Kinnear’s Mills Anglican Church 1903-1907 Arthabaska CE305,S1
  Kinnear’s Mills Presbyterian Church 1901-1912 Arthabaska CE305,S43
  Knowlton Methodist Church 1860-1879 Bedford CE502,S81
  Knowlton United Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S43
  Knox Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Bonaventure CE103,S19
  Knox Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S122
L Date District Cote
  Lachine Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S209
  Lachute Baptist Church 1900-1911 Terrebonne CE606,S72
  Lachute Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S58
  Lachute Weslyan Methodist Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S91
  Lacolle Methodist Church 1900-1910 Iberville CE604,S38
  Lacroix Presbyterian Church 1901-1912 Montréal CE601,S277
  Lake Beauport and Stoneham Anglican Church 1856-1883 Québec CE301,S83
  Lakefield Methodist Church 1900-1910 Terrebonne CE606,S46
  Leeds Anglican Church 1901-1912 Arthabaska CE305,S13
  Leeds Presbyterian Church 1901-1912 Arthabaska CE305,S14
  Leeds Wesleyan Methodist Church 1901-1909 Arthabaska CE305,S15
  Lennoxville Methodist Church 1875-1908 Saint-François CE501,S81
  Litchfield Presbyterian Church 1894-1907 Pontiac CE702,S29
  Livingstone Presbyterian Church 1911 Montréal CE601,S314
  Longueuil Montreal South Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S193
  Longueuil Presbyterian Church 1908-1912 Longueuil CE608,S3
  Lost River Presbyterian Church 1900-1905 Terrebonne CE606,S54
  Lotbinière, St. Gille’s and St. Sylvester’s Anglican Church 1840-1893 Québec CE301,S90
  Lotbinière, St. Sylvester’s Presbyterian Church 1857-1890 Québec CE301,S91
  Lower Ireland Holiness Movement Church 1902-1911 Arthabaska CE305,

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M to Sac

M Date District Cote
·           MacVicar Memorial Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S278

 

 

  Magog Congregational Church 1863 Saint-François CE501,S67
  Magog Methodist Church 1876-1908 Saint-François CE501,S82
  Maisonneuve Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S216
  Maniwaki-Aylwin United Presbyterian Church 1908-1912 Labelle CE610,S27
  Mansonville Anglican Church 1856-1879 Bedford CE502,S46
  Mansonville Baptist Church 1909-1912 Bedford CE611,S102
  Mansonville Methodist Church 1873-1879 Bedford CE502,S83
  Mansonville Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S45
  Marbleton Methodist Church 1861-1908 Saint-François CE501,S76
  Marine Hospital Anglican Church 1856-1889 Québec CE301,S72
  Marsboro Presbyterian Church 1901-1908 Mégantic CE503,S4
  Mascouche Methodist Church 1900-1910 Joliette CE605,S58
  Masis Ados Synagogue 1911 Montréal CE601,S313
  Matapedia Anglican Church 1905-1910 Bonaventure CE103,S27
  Matapedia Presbyterian Church of Canada 1900-1905 Bonaventure CE103,S24
  Melbourne Baptist Free-Will Church 1837-1855 Saint-François CE501,S60
  Melbourne Congregational Church 1837-1908 Saint-François CE501,S68
  Melbourne Methodist Church 1838-1908 Saint-François CE501,S83
  Melbourne Presbyterian Church 1840-1879 Saint-François CE501,S90
  Melville Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S215
  Methodist Church of Barachois Malbay 1900 Gaspé CE102,S33
  Methodist of Gaspe Bassin 1885-1913 Gaspé CE102,S31
  Metis Beach Presbyterian Church 1901-1911 Rimouski CE101,S16
  Metis Beach Wesleyan Methodist Congregation 1901-1912 Rimouski CE101,S18
  Milan Presbyterian Church 1900-1903 Mégantic CE503,S5
  Mille Isles Anglican Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S32
  Mille Isles Presbyterian Church 1901-1911 Terrebonne CE606,S59
  Milton Mission Anglican Church 1902-1906 Bedford CE611,S78
  Milton-Est Anglican Church 1852-1899 Bedford CE502,S43
  Minton Methodist Church 1896-1908 Saint-François CE501,S142
  Mission catholique des cantons de Shipton et de Tingwick 1878-1879 Saint-François CE501,S1
  Mission de Blanc-Sablon 1912 Protonotaire de Mingan CE901,S19
  Mission of Portland 1899-1912 Hull CE701,S47
  Mission protestante de la Côte-Nord 1910 Protonotaire de Mingan CE901,S18
  Mission Saint-Colomban 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S31
  Missisquoi Bay Anglican Church 1804-1808 Bedford CE502,S44
  Moe’s River Baptist Church 1900-1904 Saint-François CE501,S131
  Moe’s River Baptist Free-Will Church 1867-1879 Saint-François CE501,S57
  Montebello et vicinity Church of England 1899-1912 Hull CE701,S49
  Montréal (ville) 1882-1912 Montréal CE601,S253
  Montreal Catholic Apostolic Church 1906-1912 Montréal CE601,S200
  Montreal Christian Unitarian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S132
  Montreal City Mission 1911-1912 Montréal CE601,S312
  Montreal First Baptist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S85
  Montreal Holiness Movement 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S259
  Montreal Hungarian Austrian Synagogue 1901-1912 Montréal CE601,S265
  Montreal West Methodist Church 1903-1910 Montréal CE601,S273
  Montreal West Presbyterian Church 1901-1912 Montréal CE601,S217
  Morin Flats Holiness Movement Church 1906-1911 Terrebonne CE606,S93
  Mount Royal Avenue Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S210
  Mountain Street Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S105
N Date District Cote
  Namur Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S59
  New Glasgow Anglican Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S33
  New Glasgow Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S60
  New Jerusalem in the Revelation Church 1900-1906 Montréal CE601,S114
  New Liverpool Anglican Christ Church 1872-1912 Québec CE301,S77
  New Richmond Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Bonaventure CE103,S22
  Newport Anglican Mission 1900-1903 Saint-François CE501,S159
  North Hatley Baptist Church 1903-1908 Saint-François CE501,S166
  North Side Presbyterian Church 1900-1908 Bonaventure CE103,S21
  North Stukely Methodist Church 1869-1899 Bedford CE502,S82
  North Wakefield Methodist Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S56
  Norwood Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S218
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce 1883-1912 Montréal CE601,S6
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce-de-Hull 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S18
  Notre-Dame-de-Granby 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S12
  Notre-Dame-de-Granby 1846-1899 Bedford CE502,S3
  Notre-Dame-de-Jacques-Cartier 1901-1912 Québec CE301,S33
  Notre-Dame-de-Montréal 1883-1914 Montréal CE601,S51
  Notre-Dame-de-Portneuf 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S31
  Notre-Dame-de-Québec 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S1
  Notre-Dame-des-Anges-de-Stanbridge 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S26
  Notre-Dame-des-Neiges 1901-1912 Montréal CE601,S236
O Date District Cote
  Odelltown Methodist Church 1900-1912 Iberville CE604,S31
  Oka Methodist Church 1900-1910 Terrebonne CE606,S47
  Olivet Baptist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S86
  Onslow Township Presbyterian Church 1900-1907 Pontiac CE702,S30
  Ormstown Anglican Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S30
  Ormstown Holiness Mouvement Church 1900-1909 Beauharnois CE607,S82
  Ormstown Methodist Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S28
  Outremont Church of the Ascension 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S201
  Outremont Presbyterian Church 1912 Montréal CE601,S316
P Date District Cote
  Papineauville Baptist Church 1900-1911 Hull CE701,S51
  Philipsburg Congregational Church 1845-1849 Bedford CE502,S69
  Philipsburg Methodist Church 1864-1899 Bedford CE502,S84
  Philipsburgh-Saint-Armand United Methodist Church 1901-1912 Bedford CE611,S81
  Point St. Charles Baptist Church 1900-1913 Montréal CE601,S88
  Point. St. Charles Congregational Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S192
  Pointe Fortune Methodist Church 1900-1903 Montréal CE601,S107
  Poltimore Presbyterian Church 1901-1905 Hull CE701,S61
  Port Daniel and l’Anse aux Gascons Church of England 1909-1912 Bonaventure CE103,S31
  Portage-du-Fort Methodist Church 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S25
  Portage-du-Fort Presbyterian Church 1895-1907 Pontiac CE702,S31
  Portneuf and Bourg Louis Methodist Church 1834-1870 Québec CE301,S86
  Portneuf Presbyterian Church 1846-1847 Québec CE301,S88
  Potton Anglican Church 1900-1901 Bedford CE611,S82
  Potton Methodist Church 1837-1853 Bedford CE502,S85
  Première église méthodiste française de Montréal 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S103
  Presbyterian City Mission 1910-1912 Montréal CE601,S307
  Presbyterian, Côte-Saint-George (Dalhousie Mills Station), Saint-Télesphore 1893-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S83
  Protestant Episcopal of Sandy Beach 1885-1912 Gaspé CE102,S32
  Protestant Episcopal of St-Paul & St-James of Gaspe Bassin 1885-1912 Gaspé CE102,S37
  Protestant Episcopal, Percé and Cape Cove 1885-1912 Gaspé CE102,S28
  Protestant Hospital for the Insane 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S194
Q Date District Cote
  Quebec Anglican Travelling Missionaries 1826-1848 Québec CE301,S74
  Quebec Baptist Church 1858-1912 Québec CE301,S69
  Québec Beth Israel Synagogue 1897-1912 Québec CE301,S120
  Quebec Congregational Church 1838-1881 Québec CE301,S70
  Québec Lunatic Asylum Anglican Church 1879-1894 Québec CE301,S78
  Quyon Methodist Church 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S24
R Date District Cote
  Ramsey All Saints Anglican 1900-1911 Joliette CE605,S61
  Rawdon Methodist Church 1838-1912 Joliette CE605,S45
  Redeemer Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S146
  Registres protestants de Saint-Marcel 1906 Montmagny CE302,S39
  Rivière Désert Anglican Church 1900-1912 Labelle CE610,S10
  Rivière-du-Loup Methodists Church 1901 Kamouraska CE104,S45
  Rivière-du-Loup-en-Bas Anglican Church 1900-1912 Kamouraska CE104,S35
  Robinson Methodist Church 1869-1870 Saint-François CE501,S74
  Rock Island Congregational Church 1838-1908 Saint-François CE501,S71
  Rockburn Presbyterian Church 1900-1911 Beauharnois CE607,S51
  Roxton Falls Methodist Church 1900 Bedford CE611,S83
  Roxton Pond Baptist Church 1876-1879 Bedford CE502,S61
  Roxton Pond Methodist Church 1880-1895 Bedford CE502,S108
  Roxton-Sud Methodist Church 1866-1879 Bedford CE502,S86
  Runnymede-Deeside Presbyterian Church of Canada 1906-1912 Bonaventure CE103,S29
  Russelltown Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S50
S Date District Cote
  Sabrevois Anglican Church 1900-1910 Iberville CE604,S24

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Saint – Protestant Churches

S Date District   Cote
  Saint Alban’s Anglican Church of Scotstown 1900-1912 Saint-François CE501,S128
  Saint Andrew’s Anglican Church 1911-1912 Saint-Maurice CE404,S34
  Saint Andrew’s Presbyterian Church 1901-1912 Trois-Rivières CE401,S49
  Saint Andrew’s Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S35
  Saint Anne de Bellevue Methodist Church 1908-1909 Montréal CE601,S287
  Saint Anne’s Anglican Church of Richmond 1880-1912 Saint-François CE501,S127
  Saint Anthony 1884-1912 Montréal CE601,S165
  Saint Augustine’s Anglican Church of Danville 1830-1912 Saint-François CE501,S47
  Saint Barnabas’ Anglican Church of Agnes 1900-1912 Mégantic CE503,S1
  Saint Barnabas’ Anglican Church of North Hatley 1906-1912 Saint-François CE501,S164
  Saint Bartholomew 1898-1899 Trois-Rivières CE401,S12
  Saint Clément’s 1901-1912 Protonotaire de Mingan CE901,S14
  Saint Cuthbert’s Anglican Church of Dixville 1871-1910 Saint-François CE501,S42
  Saint Francis District Anglican Travelling Missionaries 1853-1867 Saint-François CE501,S37
  Saint George Protestant Congregation 1876-1912 Drummond CE403,S17
  Saint George’s Anglican Church of Georgeville 1867-1912 Saint-François CE501,S40
  Saint George’s Anglican Church of Lennoxville 1846-1912 Saint-François CE501,S43
  Saint George’s Church of England 1893-1912 Pontiac CE702,S20
  Saint George’s Church of England at Campbell’s Bay 1903-1912 Pontiac CE702,S13
  Saint George’s Church of England in the village of Portage-du-Fort 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S14
  Saint James Protestant Church 1901-1912 Trois-Rivières CE401,S50
  Saint James’ Anglican Church of Compton 1840-1912 Saint-François CE501,S36
  Saint James’ Anglican Church of Hatley 1818-1912 Saint-François CE501,S41
  Saint James’ Church of England 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S45
  Saint John the Evangelist 1901-1912 Saint-Maurice CE404,S29
  Saint John’s Anglican Church of Melbourne 1858-1912 Saint-François CE501,S45
  Saint John’s Anglican Church of Waterville 1900-1912 Saint-François CE501,S129
  Saint John’s Evangelist Church of England 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S9
  Saint Luke’s Anglican Church of Magog 1869-1912 Saint-François CE501,S44
  Saint Mary of Czestochowa 1909-1912 Montréal CE601,S285
  Saint Mary’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S76
  Saint Matthew’s Evangelical Lutheran Church 1907-1912 Hull CE701,S39
  Saint Paul’s 1905-1912 Drummond CE403,S29
  Saint Paul’s Anglican Church of England 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S10
  Saint Paul’s Anglican Church of Marbleton 1850-1912 Saint-François CE501,S38
  Saint Paul’s Baptist Church 1910-1912 Montréal CE601,S299
  Saint Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church 1901-1912 Hull CE701,S40
  Saint Peter’s Anglican Church 1871-1903 Abitibi CE801,S2
  Saint Peter’s Anglican Church of Cookshire 1823-1912 Saint-François CE501,S39
  Saint Peter’s Anglican Church of Sherbrooke 1827-1912 Saint-François CE501,S46
  Saint Philip’s Anglican Church of Sawyerville 1902-1912 Saint-François CE501,S165
  Saint Philippe’s Methodist Mission 1904-1907 Arthabaska CE402,S89
  Saint Philippe’s Presbyterian Church 1911 Arthabaska CE402,S90
  Saint Stephen’s Anglican Church 1899-1912 Hull CE701,S34
  Saint Stephen’s Anglican Church of Coaticook 1862-1912 Saint-François CE501,S35
  Saint Stephen’s Church of England 1901-1911 Saint-Maurice CE404,S23
  Saint Thomas Church of England 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S12

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Saint Catholic Parishes

S Date District Cote
  Saint-Aloysius 1908-1912 Montréal CE601,S237
  Saint-Ambroise-de-Kildare 1900-1912 Joliette CE605,S3
  Saint-Andrew United Church 1903 Terrebonne CE606,S92
  Saint-Armand Centre Free Methodist Church 1905-1912 Bedford CE611,S86
  Saint-Armand East Methodist Church 1902-1910 Bedford CE611,S87
  Saint-Armand Free Methodist Church 1901-1902 Bedford CE611,S33
  Saint-Armand-East Holy Trinity Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S71
  Saint-Armand-West Anglican Church 1809-1879 Bedford CE502,S48
  Saint-Armand-West Methodist Church
  Saint-Armand-West Presbyterian Church
  Saint-Cajetan-d’Armagh 1877-1912 Montmagny CE302,S10
  Saint-Clément-de-Beauharnois 1877-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S4
  Saint-Colomb-de-Sillery 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S58
  Saint-Colomban 1877-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S10
  Saint-Constant Baptist Church 1904-1912 Longueuil CE608,S1
  Saint-Cuthbert 1900-1912 Joliette CE605,S19
  Saint-Edmond-de-Stoneham 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S59
  Saint-Élie-d’Orford 1887-1912 Saint-François CE501,S102
  Saint-François-de-Sales-de-Templeton 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S10
  Saint-François-Xavier-de-Caughnawaga 1883-1912 Montréal CE601,S25
  Saint-François-Xavier-de-Shefford 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S5
  Saint-Frédéric-de-Drummondville 1876-1912 Drummond CE403,S8
  Saint-Gabriel 1882-1912 Montréal CE601,S27
  Saint-Gabriel-de-Brandon 1900-1912 Joliette CE605,S23
  Saint-Gabriel-de-Valcartier 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S60
  Saint-Georges 1877-1912 Beauce CE306,S14
  Saint-Georges-de-Clarenceville Baptist Church 1903-1912 Bedford CE611,S62
  Saint-Gilles-de-Beaurivage 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S46
  Saint-Grégoire-de-Nazianze-de-Buckingham 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S14
  Saint-Ignace-du-Coteau-du-Lac 1877-1912 Montréal CE601,S31
  Saint-Jacques-le-Majeur 1877-1912 Montréal CE601,S1
  Saint-Jean-Baptiste-de-Québec 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S97
  Saint-Joachim-de-la-Pointe-Claire 1883-1912 Montréal CE601,S37
  Saint-John the Divine Anglican Church 1896-1911 Roberval CE202,S16
  Saint-Lazare 1877-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S9
  Saint-Léon, Westmount 1901-1912 Montréal CE601,S243
  Saint-Léonard-de-Port-Maurice 1899-1912 Québec CE301,S115
  Saint-Léonard-de-Port-Maurice 1886-1912 Montréal CE601,S172
  Saint-Louis-de-Portland 1900-1910 Hull CE701,S2
  Saint-Luc-de-la-Grosse-Île 1875-1912 Montmagny CE302,S12
  Saint-Malachie 1900-1910 Hull CE701,S26
  Saint-Malachie-d’Ormstown 1877-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S11
  Saint-Malachie-de-Frampton 1877-1912 Beauce CE306,S22
  Saint-Patrice 1900-1912 Kamouraska CE104,S8
  Saint-Patrice 1900-1912 Joliette CE605,S18
  Saint-Patrice 1883-1912 Montréal CE601,S52
  Saint-Patrice-de-Beaurivage 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S51
  Saint-Patrice-de-Hinchinbrooke 1877-1911 Beauharnois CE607,S13
  Saint-Patrice-de-la-Rivière-Pentecôte 1901-1912 Protonotaire de Mingan CE901,S9
  Saint-Patrice-de-Magog 1861-1912 Saint-François CE501,S19
  Saint-Patrice-de-Sherrington 1877-1912 Iberville CE604,S13
  Saint-Patrice-de-Tingwick 1857-1912 Arthabaska CE402,S12
  Saint-Patrick 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S98
  Saint-Patrick de Sherbrooke 1889-1912 Saint-François CE501,S108
  Saint-Patrick-de-Douglastown 1885-1912 Gaspé CE102,S22
  Saint-Paul-d’Aylmer 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S12
  Saint-Paul-de-Chester Methodist Church 1898-1899 Arthabaska CE402,S88
  Saint-Paul-de-Sheenborough 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S17
  Saint-Roch-de-Québec 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S22
  Saint-Romain-de-Hemmingford 1877-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S16

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Sainte – Catholic Parishes

S Date District Cote
  Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts Anglican Trinity Church 1901-1910 Terrebonne CE606,S90
  Sainte-Agnès 1877-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S21
  Sainte-Agnès 1884-1912 Mégantic CE503,S17
  Sainte-Anastasie-de-Lachute 1878-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S2
  Sainte-Anne de Montréal 1883-1912 Montréal CE601,S9
  Sainte-Anne-de-Danville 1866-1912 Saint-François CE501,S4
  Sainte-Anne-du-Bout-de-l’Île 1883-1912 Montréal CE601,S11
  Sainte-Anne-du-Grand-Calumet 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S4
  Sainte-Brigide 1911-1912 Pontiac CE702,S35
  Sainte-Brigide 1883-1912 Montréal CE601,S15
  Sainte-Catherine 1877-1912 Québec CE301,S39
  Sainte-Ursule 1888-1912 Trois-Rivières CE401,S16

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ST – Protestant Churches

 

S Date District Cote
  St. Agnes 1904-1912 Montréal CE601,S247
  St. Alban Anglican Church 1901-1912 Montréal CE601,S254
  St. Andrew Christ Church Anglican 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S34
  St. Andrew Congregational Church 1900-1911 Terrebonne CE606,S38
  St. Andrew Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S62
  St. Andrew’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S184
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church 1908-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S85
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S40
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S35
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S279
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church (Lake Megantic) 1900-1902 Mégantic CE503,S22
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church of Lachine 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S124
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church of Lévis 1855-1913 Québec CE301,S76
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church of Melbourne 1800-1857 Québec CE301,S73
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church of Montreal 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S125
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church of Quebec 1770-1912 Québec CE301,S66
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church of Valcartier 1901-1911 Québec CE301,S125
  St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Sherbrooke 1865-1908 Saint-François CE501,S92
  St. Augustin’s Anglican Church 1908-1912 Montréal CE601,S175
  St. Barnabas’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S202
  St. Bartholomew’s Anglican Church 1850-1912 Québec CE301,S89
  St. Bartholomew’s Reformed Episcopal Church 1900-1909 Montréal CE601,S159
  St. Clement Anglican Church 1907-1912 Montréal CE601,S255
  St. Cuthbert’s Anglican Church 1910-1912 Montréal CE601,S298
  St. Cuthberts Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S220
  St. Cyprien Anglican Church 1904-1912 Montréal CE601,S256
  St. Edward’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S185
  St. Ephrem d’Upton Anglican Church 1869-1873 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S31
  St. Gabriel Street Presbyterian Church 1900-1909 Montréal CE601,S126
  St. George Anglican Church of Adamsville 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S55
  St. George Anglican Church of Clarenceville 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S35
  St. George Anglican Church of Granby 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S40
  St. George Methodist Church 1845-1899 Bedford CE502,S75
  St. George’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S186
  St. George’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S68
  St. Georges Anglican Church 1894-1910 Beauce CE306,S37
  St. Giles Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S221
  St. Hyacinthe Anglican Church 1851-1912 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S30
  St. James Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S31
  St. James Anglican Church 1892-1911 Québec CE301,S122
  St. James the Apostle Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S69
  St. James The Apostle Anglican Church of Bedford 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S39
  St. James The Apostle Anglican Church of Stanbridge East 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S47
  St. James’ Anglican Church 1824-1912 Joliette CE605,S41
  St. James’s Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S109
  St. John Anglican Church of Eastman 1900-1910 Bedford CE611,S67
  St. John Anglican Church of Lac-Brôme 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S34
  St. John Anglican Church of West Shefford 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S98
  St. John the Baptist Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S225
  St. John the Divine Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S59
  St. John the Evangelist’s Anglican Church 1901-1911 Montréal CE601,S70
  St. John’s Anglican Church 1862-1909 Joliette CE605,S42
  St. John’s Anglican Church 1907-1912 Arthabaska CE305,S45
  St. John’s German Lutheran Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S98
  St. John’s the Evangelist Anglican Church 1840-1912 Québec CE301,S87
  St. Johns Anglican Church 1900-1912 Iberville CE604,S28
  St. Johns Methodist Church 1900-1912 Iberville CE604,S32
  St. Jovite Methodist Church 1900-1911 Terrebonne CE606,S68
  St. Jude’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S71
  St. Lambert Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S227
  St. Louis de Gonzague Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S68
  St. Luke’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S50
  St. Luke’s Anglican Church of Montreal 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S73
  St. Margaret’s and St. Chad’s Anglican Church 1908-1912 Montréal CE601,S196
  St. Mark’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S69
  St. Mark’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S74
  St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S128
  St. Martin’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S75
  St. Mary’s Anglican Church of Island of Orleans 1867-1911 Québec CE301,S81
  St. Mary’s Anglican Church of Montmorency Fall 1876-1912 Québec CE301,S80
  St. Mathew’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S29
  St. Mathew’s Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S129
  St. Mathias’ Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S77
  St. Matthew Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S90
  St. Matthew’s Anglican Church 1863-1912 Québec CE301,S63
  St. Michael The Archangel 1902-1912 Montréal CE601,S244
  St. Michael’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S35
  St. Michael’s Anglican Church 1860-1912 Québec CE301,S79
  St. Mungo’s Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S53
  St. Nicholas Syrian Orthodox Church 1906-1912 Montréal CE601,S264
  St. Patrick Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S57
  St. Paul Anglican Church of Mansonville 1902-1912 Bedford CE611,S44
  St. Paul Anglican Church of Phillipsburg 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S79
  St. Paul d’Abbotsford Anglican Church 1824-1912 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S28
  St. Paul d’Abbotsford Congregational Church 1837-1857 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S32
  St. Paul’s Anglican Church 1833-1901 Québec CE301,S64
  St. Paul’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S78
  St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S29
  St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S130
  St. Peter’s Anglican Church 1834-1912 Québec CE301,S65
  St. Phillip’s Anglican Church 1898-1912 Montréal CE601,S187
  St. Savior’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Iberville CE604,S23
  St. Simeon’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S30
  St. Simon’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S188
  St. Stephen’s Anglican Church of Chambly 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S79
  St. Stephen’s Anglican Church of Lachine 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S80
  St. Stephen’s Anglican Church of Montreal 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S81
  St. Thomas Anglican Church 1900-1912 Saint-Hyacinthe CE602,S42
  St. Thomas’ Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S82
  St. Vincent de Paul Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S83
  St.Andrew’s Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bonaventure CE103,S17
  St.Paul’s Anglican Church of Knowlton 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S42

 


Une qu
http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna/ecivil/esti

Sau to Z

 

S Date District Cote
  Savages Mills Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S80
  Sawyerville Baptist Church 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S132
  Sawyerville Methodist Church 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S144
  Sawyerville Presbyterian Church 1901-1904 Saint-François CE501,S148
  Scandinavian Lutheran Mission 1909-1910 Montréal CE601,S301
  Scotstown Adventist Church 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S119
  Scotstown Presbyterian Church 1908 Saint-François CE501,S149
  Seventh Day Adventist Church 1910-1912 Montréal CE601,S302
  Seventh Day Adventist Church, Dixville 1907-1908 Saint-François CE501,S168
  Seventh Day Adventist Church, South Barnston 1856-1906 Saint-François CE501,S31
  Shaw Memorial North End Methodist Church 1908-1912 Montréal CE601,S154
  Shawbridge Methodist Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S49
  Shawville Holiness Movement Church 1901-1912 Pontiac CE702,S22
  Shawville Methodist Church 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S28
  Shawville Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Pontiac CE702,S32
  Shefford Anglican Church 1880-1894 Bedford CE502,S102
  Shefford Methodist Church 1831-1886 Bedford CE502,S88
  Shefford Vale Adventist Church 1891-1895 Bedford CE502,S152
  Shefford-Ouest Anglican Church 1823-1879 Bedford CE502,S49
  Shefford-Ouest Methodist Church 1878-1899 Bedford CE502,S89
  Sherbrooke Congregational Church 1838-1908 Saint-François CE501,S69
  Sherbrooke Methodist Church 1848-1908 Saint-François CE501,S84
  Sherbrooke Street Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S112
  Shigawake and Port-Daniel Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bonaventure CE103,S16
  Sorel Baptist Church 1896-1899 Richelieu CE603,S29
  Sorel Congregational Church 1844-1847 Richelieu CE603,S17
  South Ely Baptist Church 1878-1879 Bedford CE502,S58
  South Ely-Valcourt Baptist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S89
  South Potton Baptist Church 1845-1859 Bedford CE502,S60
  South Stukely-Eastman United Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S91
  Spanish and Portuguese Shearith Israël Synagogue 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S97
  St-Cyprien Presbyterian Church 1900-1910 Kamouraska CE104,S41
  St-Georges Anglican Church 1906-1911 Rimouski CE101,S38
  Stanbridge Adventist Church 1862-1899 Bedford CE502,S29
  Stanbridge Baptist Church 1842-1850 Bedford CE502,S63
  Stanbridge East Adventist Church 1871-1876 Bedford CE502,S27
  Stanbridge East Anglican Church 1852-1879 Bedford CE502,S51
  Stanley Street Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S131
  Stanstead Baptist Free-Will Church 1834-1880 Saint-François CE501,S62
  Stanstead Plain Congregational Church 1901-1907 Saint-François CE501,S174
  Stanstead Universalist Church 1905-1907 Saint-François CE501,S163
  Ste. Thérèse de Blainville Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S65
  Stoneham Valcartier and Lake Beauport Anglican Church 1839-1912 Québec CE301,S82
  Stornoway Presbyterian Church 1900 Mégantic CE503,S6
  Stukely-Sud 7th Day Adventist Church 1900-1913 Bedford CE611,S88
  Stukely-Sud Adventist Church 1879-1899 Bedford CE502,S28
  Stukely-Sud Anglican Church 1851-1879 Bedford CE502,S52
  Stukely-Sud Methodist Church 1844-1899 Bedford CE502,S90
  Sutton Adventist Church 1854-1899 Bedford CE502,S30
  Sutton Anglican Church 1851-1879 Bedford CE502,S53
  Sutton Baptist Church 1859-1873 Bedford CE502,S64
  Sutton Good Shepherd Anglican Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S73
  Sutton Methodist Church 1852-1879 Bedford CE502,S91
  Sutton Second Advent Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S94
  Sutton United Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S49
  Sutton Universalist Church 1878-1879 Bedford CE502,S96
T Date District Cote
  Tabernacle Baptist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S190
  Taylor Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S157
  Temple Baptist Church 1909-1912 Montréal CE601,S300
  Temple Emmanu-El Synagogue 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S198
  Temple Solomon 1902-1909 Montréal CE601,S271
  Templeton Township Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S60
  Thetford Mines Methodist Church 1910-1912 Arthabaska CE305,S48
  Thorne Township Evangelical Lutheran Church 1894-1912 Pontiac CE702,S8
  Thorne Township Methodist Church 1897-1907 Pontiac CE702,S26
  Thurso Baptist Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S52
  Thurso Presbyterian Church 1908-1909 Hull CE701,S65
  Tifereth Israel Synagogue 1909 Montréal CE601,S289
  Tingwick Anglican Church 1909 Saint-François CE501,S179
  Tingwick Mission Episcopal Church 1843-1844 Arthabaska CE402,S82
  Tingwick United Church of England and Ireland 1845-1911 Arthabaska CE402,S81
  Townships, Valleyfield (Ormstown, etc.) 1830-1839 Beauharnois CE607,S84
  Trinity Anglican Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S54
  Trinity Anglican Church 1900-1912 Terrebonne CE606,S28
  Trinity Anglican Church 1899-1912 Bedford CE611,S36
  Trinity Anglican Church 1859-1900 Québec CE301,S62
  Trinity Anglican Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S84
  Trois-Rivières Wesleyan Methodist Church 1901-1911 Trois-Rivières CE401,S47
U Date District Cote
  Union Congregational (Colored) Church 1907-1912 Montréal CE601,S280
  Unitarian Universalist Church, North Hatley 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S151
V Date District Cote
  Valcartier and St. Catherine’s Anglican Church 1856-1875 Québec CE301,S84
  Valcartier and Stoneham Presbyterian Church 1833-1900 Québec CE301,S85
  Valleyfield Methodist Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S71
  Valleyfield Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Beauharnois CE607,S72
  Vaudreuil Anglican Church 1891-1912 Montréal CE601,S67
  Verdun Baptist Church 1911 Montréal CE601,S311
  Verdun Methodist Church 1906-1912 Montréal CE601,S274
  Verdun Presbyterian Church 1910-1912 Montréal CE601,S308
  Victoria Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S222
W Date District Cote
  Wakefield Township Church of England 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S46
  Wakefield Township Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Hull CE701,S62
  Warden Anglican Church 1878-1879 Bedford CE502,S55
  Warwick Baptist Church 1865-1873 Arthabaska CE402,S83
  Waterloo Adventist Church 1862-1899 Bedford CE502,S31
  Waterloo Congregational Church 1872 Bedford CE502,S70
  Waterloo International Advent Church 1900-1908 Bedford CE611,S96
  Waterloo Methodist Church 1880-1899 Bedford CE502,S109
  Waterloo Redeemer Church 1879 Bedford CE502,S95
  Waterloo United Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S51
  Waterloo Universalist Church 1862-1899 Bedford CE502,S97
  Waterloo Universalist Church 1900-1908 Bedford CE611,S95
  Waterville Congregational Church 1844-1908 Saint-François CE501,S72
  Wesleyan Methodist Church 1831-1912 Québec CE301,S68
  West Bolton Second Advent Church 1904-1907 Bedford CE611,S99
  West Brome Baptist Free-Will Church 1879 Bedford CE502,S65
  West Brome Methodist Church 1867-1879 Bedford CE502,S73
  West Brome Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S97
  West End Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S113
  West End St-Joseph Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S275
  West Shefford United Methodist Church 1900-1912 Bedford CE611,S100
  Westminster Presbyterian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S223
  Westmount Advent Christian Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S147
  Westmount Methodist Church 1900-1912 Montréal CE601,S214
  White’s Station Methodist Church 1912 Beauharnois CE607,S49
  Windsor Mills Methodist Church 1876-1908 Saint-François CE501,S87
  Windsor Mills Presbyterian Church 1900-1908 Saint-François CE501,S150
  Winslow Presbyterian Church (Saint-Romain) 1901-1906 Mégantic CE503,S21

http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna/ecivil/

 

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Arthur’s Baby Book

hambabybookarthur-10

The night before three-year-old Arthur Hamilton became ill, he was reciting a rhyme and joking about lisps and kisses and mistletoe with a family friend who was helping put the children to bed. Someone – his mother or the friend – recorded those words in his baby book.

The following day, Arthur came down influenza. In fact, everyone in the house – his parents, his twin brother and his two older siblings – got sick. The others recovered, but Arthur did not.

When the influenza pandemic reached the Hamiltons’ Winnipeg home in January 1919, it was at its deadly peak. Arthur was among more than 1,200 Winnipeg residents and 50,000 Canadians killed by the pandemic, which was brought to Canada by troops returning from the trenches of World War I.1   Some 21 million people died from the virus worldwide.

Today, Arthur’s baby book, and that of his twin (my father) is in the University of Manitoba Archives as part of the Hamilton Family collection. These cheerfully illustrated booklets include important milestones, such as the twins’ first steps. Arthur’s book is especially moving because of the entry about the jokes he made just before he became ill.2

Archivist Shelley Sweeney has used Arthur’s baby book in the classroom many times. For example, she took it to a religious studies class that was exploring how people react to death by expressing regret and memorializing the person who has passed.

“It strikes people as so unbearably sad,” she says. “There are always sympathetic expressions and murmurs when I talk about it.”3

The death of a young child like Arthur seems especially sad, but the influenza pandemic traumatized whole communities. Some people lost family members to the flu after having already lost sons and brothers in the war. Many of those who died were between 20 and 40 years old, in the prime of their lives. Children were left without parents, families without income earners, businesses without customers, and manufacturers without workers. Poor neighbourhoods had the highest death rates.

Some people compared the pandemic to the Black Death of medieval times. The government banned large public gatherings to try to control the spread of the virus. Hospitals and physicians were overwhelmed.

My grandfather was a physician and my grandmother had trained as a nurse, but they couldn’t save their son. They tried everything they knew, but there were no effective treatments in 1919.

Their older son, Glen, a future a physician himself, later recalled being taken in to see Arthur’s body. He said, “I can remember on the floor beside his crib there was an enamel basin with boiling water in it – Friars Balsam [eucalyptus oil] – that aromatic stuff you put into body rub, and a little tank of oxygen. And those were the weapons to fight the flu. That was all!”4

My grandfather, Thomas Glendenning (T.G.) Hamilton, was devastated by his son’s death. Not only had he failed as a physician, but, as Glen Hamilton suggested in an interview, T.G. may have felt that he had been too attached to Arthur. “Dad was a very strict Calvinist Presbyterian and he felt that in some way, because he was so fond Arthur …. that he was being punished by the Lord ….”5

hamtwins1918winnipeg-01

Arthur’s death was a pivotal event for the Hamiltons in a way that seems surprising today, but was typical for the time. Many people were deeply religious and believed in personal survival after death. Grieving families wanted to communicate with loved ones who had passed, so they turned to mediums and séances. Between the two world wars, a strong spiritualist movement developed in Canada and elsewhere.6 Glen suggested that Arthur’s death stimulated his parents’ interest in the psychic field.

What made the Hamiltons unusual was the effort they put into exploring psychic phenomena. For more than 10 years, until T.G.’s death in 1935, they held almost weekly séances with a small group of regular participants.7 T.G. became known across Canada, the United States and England for his psychic research, while Lillian played a key organizing role in the background. T.G. emphasized the “scientific” nature of his enquiry, but his grief must have coloured these experiences.

Around 1980, Margaret (Hamilton) Bach donated her parents’ research notes, speeches and photographs to the University of Manitoba Archives, and a few years ago I added a few items, including the twins’ baby books. Today, many people consult the Hamilton Family fonds. Some are interested in psychics, several have used the collection as inspiration for plays and visual art, and other researchers are using the collection to explore how people cope with trauma.

Although many people, including myself, are skeptical about the authenticity of their experiments, it is wonderful to see that T.G.’s and Lillian’s passion is still contagious in so many different ways.

(This article is also posted on http://writinguptheancestors.blogspot.ca.)

Notes and Sources

T.G. Hamilton and Lillian (Forrrester) Hamilton had four children: Margaret Lillian (1909-1986), Glen Forrester (1911-1988), and twins James Drummond (1915-1980) – my father — and Arthur Lamont (1915-1919).

To read more about the Hamilton Family fonds, see http://umanitoba.ca/libraries/units/archives/digital/hamilton/index.html

1 Janice Dickin, Patricia G. Bailey, “Influenza”, The Canadian Encyclopedia, Historica Canada, http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/influenza/ (accessed March 20, 2017)

2. Baby book of Arthur Lamont Hamilton. University of Manitoba Archives and Special Collections (UMASC), Hamilton Family fond, A10-01, Winnipeg.

3. Personal email communication with Shelley Sweeney, March 23, 2017.

4. James B. Nickels. “Psychic Research in a Winnipeg Family: Reminiscences of Dr. Glen F. Hamilton”, Manitoba History, June 2007, p. 5.

5. Ibid.

6. Esyllt Jones, “Spectral Influenza: Winnipeg’s Hamilton Family, Interwar Spiritualism and Pandemic Disease,” in Magda Fahrni and Esyllt W. Jones, editors, Epidemic Encounters: Influenza, Society and Culture in Canada, 1918-20, Vancouver: UBC Press, 2012, p. 195.

7. Janice Hamilton “Bring on Your Ghosts!” Paranormal Review, winter 2016, p. 6. This edition of the magazine, published by The Society for Psychical Research in England, is entirely devoted to the psychic research carried out by the Hamiltons.

 

Finding Great Great Grandmother: Elizabeth Mowat Sutherland

img_4691

Elizabeth Mowat is my great great grandmother. I didn’t even know her name before I began my genealogy quest. I still don’t know much about her but I now have a photograph, a portrait of her in her “go to church clothes” with the requisite black bonnet.

There were no pictures of her in the box that started my family history search, although there was a family photograph of her husband William, her son Donald, his wife Alice and three of their children, William, Mary and James Dickson. I originally thought Elizabeth was alive at the time, so why on such an occasion was she not with them at the photographers? It later turned out she died in 1883 and not the assumed 1888.

It was through the internet and RootsWeb that I finally saw her face. Robert Harkness, from her daughter-in-law Alice’s line, said his family had lost all their old photos and information in a house fire but his uncle might know some family history. I wrote to his uncle, Bruce Harkness but did not hear anything. Then a couple of months later I received a letter from a George Dickson with photos and stories. He was also a relative of Alice’s and lived in the same apartment building as Bruce, in Belmore, Ontario. Bruce had shared my letter and it was George who responded. In the package was a picture of Elizabeth.

She was born in 1829 in Pulteneytown, Caithness, Scotland. Her parents were James Mowat and Isabelle Houston. It doesn’t appear that she had any siblings or at least any that survived to the 1841 census.

She married William Sutherland a shoemaker and 13 years her senior, May 1845, in Pulteneytown and they set out for Canada soon after. They sailed with two of William’s nephews and their wives so he had some family with him, but Elizabeth left her family and her life, never to see them again. There are Sutherland letters that have survived which reported on all the neighbours and friends so I assume the Mowats also heard about their daughter’s new life and family.

Elizabeth and William had seven children, William, James, Donald, Christina, Isabella, George, and John. They moved from Toronto to West Gwillimbury and finally to their own land in Carrick, Bruce County Ontario. After clearing the land and farming for a number of years they gave up the hard work and moved back to Toronto.

Elizabeth died in 1883 and William died in 1887. My sister Jeannie and I visited Mount Pleasant Cemetery and found their tombstone. The names were readable but not the inscription. As Jeannie went to the car to get some paper to try a rubbing, the sun came out and it’s angle made the inscription jump out,“The dead in Christ shall rise first”.

Notes:

Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.Original data: Scotland, Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013

Extracts of entries in an Old Parochial Register. Proclamations of Banns and marriages Parish of Wick, County of Caithnes general register Office, New Register House Edinburch on 26 September 2000.

Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Series: MS935; Reel: 36 Source InformationAncestry.com. Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869-1938, 1943-1944, and Deaths Overseas, 1939-1947 Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.Cert.

“The dead in Christ shall rise first.” 1 Thessalonians 4:16

How to Bring a Voice to Your Personal Essay

Writing stories about your ancestors can seem a bit self-indulgent.  Who wants to hear about your long dead aunties and uncles? Your own relatives may roll their eyes when you pull out your tablet and talk about the blood, sweat and tears that went into a year-long investigation into an-all-but-forgotten life.

Sure, the genealogy writing exercise may start out as a purely personal exploration (as in Why am I here?) but with careful attention to detail and a sense of humility on your part, the practice can become so much more than that.

Exploring ancestry through prose provides you with a versatile platform to inform and delight your readers.  Your stories even may inspire others to take the plunge and explore their own roots while polishing their writing skills.

Genealogy writing is often personal in nature, as in “My great grandmother, Lydia Tittle, was born in 1897 in the poorest part of Ulster,” and it sometimes it comes in the form of the personal essay, as in “When I was a little girl growing up in rural Georgia, I was very close to my Ma Tante Mathilde, my father’s French sister.”

It may sound counter-intuitive, but my top tip to avoid sounding self-indulgent when writing about yourself and/or your ancestors is to use your own natural voice.

What is ‘voice’? Well, storytelling was once a sacred art.  The storyteller invoked a muse to tell a certain tale to an enraptured audience. I like to think of ‘the writing voice’ as something similar. Before I get down to writing a first draft, I invoke a piece of my personality to tell the story. For me, it’s a feeling I conjure up, much like I’m told a method actor does before walking onto the stage, and sometimes, as with acting, it can be a bit unsettling to bring up this feeling/personality, even scary. It certainly doesn’t feel self-indulgent.  Enveloped in this character/feeling, it’s easier for me to choose the appropriate words and expressions while writing and to maintain a consistent tone for the piece.

The biggest mistake any beginning writer can do is to try to imitate someone else’s voice because   readers will pick up quickly on the deception, but if you write stories in your own voice, even if you are still developing your style and technical skills (and what writer isn’t?) your readers will be inclined to be generous with you because they will sense you are ‘opening up’ to them, taking a risk, giving them a little piece of your heart, as it were.

Ask yourself these questions before you embark on the personal essay writing journey:

  1. Are you using your own unique voice?
  2. Is your essay and the information contained within worthy of the time the reader will spend on it?
  3. Does your story have substance? Is it useful, as in informative; diverting as in surprising or funny; or moving, as in sentimental or touching?
  4. Does your story have universal human appeal so that all readers can relate, or is it aimed at a specific reader with a specific interest?
  5. Does your story have a take-away, a gift that keeps on giving such as a fascinating fact or two, a broader insight, or some useful research tips that the reader can call upon later?

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

Montrealers really enjoy a parade and this year marks the 194th Saint Patricks Day Parade organized by the Irish Society of Montreal. On Sunday, March 19th people will line St Catherine’s Street, mostly on the sunny side, to cheer the floats, dance to the bands and even have a “little something” to help them stay warm.

This is a great time to start researching your ancestors. You never know what stories you will uncover. Some of you may find Irish roots even if your name is Tremblay or Gagnon. Many Irish came to Canada in the mid-1800’s, before and after the potato famine. Sandra McHugh’s great-grandparents left Ireland at this time but moved to Scotland rather than the North America. Read about their journey in Everyone is Irish on St Patricks Day. https://genealogyensemble.com/2016/03/16/everyone-is-irish-on-st-patricks-day/

Most of the Irish immigrants to Canada arrived in Quebec City and then traveled on to Montreal. Some of the Irish Catholics did settle in towns and villages all around Quebec while most of the Protestants moved on to Upper Canada. Jacques Gagne’s The Irish of Frampton Quebec https://genealogyensemble.com/2016/09/11/the-irish-of-frampton-quebec/ and The Irish Catholic Churches of Quebec https://genealogyensemble.com/2014/05/20/irish-catholic-churches-of-quebec/ are great sources of information on the lives of these people who populated Quebec.   

Janice Hamilton shows that persistence pays off in genealogy research in her Breaking Through My Sherman Brick Wall about the Irish origins of her great great grandmother Martha Bagnall Shearman. https://genealogyensemble.com/2016/07/06/breaking-through-my-shearman-brick-wall/ Census, birth, marriage and death records are harder to find in Ireland as a fire destroyed the Public Records Office in1922 but information can still be found. Janice found that aside from Canada the family has spread to the United States and New Zealand. There are Irish everywhere.

My Irish ancestors were all Protestants and more apt to celebrate the glorious twelfth than Saint Patricks Day. The Orangemen would march on July 12th to celebrate the battle of the Boyne when the protestant king, William of Orange defeated catholic James II. Susan Dodds and Alexander Bailey came from County Monaghan in Northern Ireland and their story is told in The Sampler. https://genealogyensemble.com/2016/04/20/susan-dodds-sampler/

So whether you have the ancestors or just want to pretend, have corn-beef and cabbage, drink a green beer and celebrate being Irish!

Montreal Cemeteries

Genealogists tend to visit a lot of cemeteries, so if those are beautiful places, the experience can be a pleasure. Anyone with Montreal ancestors in either Notre-Dame-des-Neiges (Catholic) Cemetery or in the non-denominational Mount Royal Cemetery can consider themselves lucky: both cemeteries are located on the slopes of Mount Royal, both are filled with trees and wildlife, and both have services to assist genealogists find their relatives.

These cemeteries were opened in the middle of the 19th century after the city’s population expanded, putting earlier burial grounds too close to residential areas. Hygienic concerns became particularly important when cholera epidemics swept the continent.

In fact, because of epidemics, poor sanitation and a lack of clean drinking water, many of the city’s dead were children.

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The cemetery at St. Stephen’s Anglican Church, Lachine.     jh photo

Since Mount Royal Cemetery opened in 1852, more than 300,000 people have been buried there. To check the location of a grave in Mount Royal Cemetery, go to  https://mountroyalcem.com/index.php/en/our-services/genealogy-menu.html. The Quebec Family History Society (QFHS) sells a book of 4600 monument inscriptions from Hawthorn-Dale, Montreal’s second-largest Protestant Cemetery and an affiliate of Mount Royal Cemetery. See http://www.qfhs.ca/forsale.php.

Notre-Dame-des-Neiges Cemetery, the largest graveyard in Canada, has been in operation since 1874. To find a grave there go to http://www.notredamedesneigescemetery.ca/en/research/locate.htm and click on locate deceased.

When the older cemeteries were closed, people were told they could move the remains of their relatives, but that did not always happen. Every now and then, human remains turn up when repairs are done to Dorchester Square, a former cemetery that is now a park in the heart of downtown. And in addition to proper cemeteries, there are some unusual burial places in the city. Priests and nuns were buried in the crypts of Catholic churches and other religious buildings. Some 6000 Irish immigrants who died of ship fever in 1847 are buried in a mass grave, marked with a commemorative stone, near the Victoria Bridge.

Because so many of the city’s old cemeteries were closed and eventually built upon or used for other purposes, anyone who comes to the city looking to find the grave of an ancestor who died before the mid-1800s will probably be disappointed.

For a list of 110 Montreal cemeteries, current and closed, including crypts and military cemeteries, see http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/ListerCims.asp?MP=E3&TY=M&SS=52

To find out about Jewish burials, see the following article posted on the Jewish Genealogy Society of Montreal website: http://jgs-montreal.org/burials.html

The QFHS has a number of publications related to cemetery histories and monument inscriptions in its library. Go to http://www.qfhs.ca/libraryRecords.php and put cemetery in the keyword space.

Following is a list of old cemeteries primarily used by the city’s English-speaking community. Most of them no longer exist. The links will tell you their locations and other information.

Montreal General Old Cemetery   http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=2148

 Montreal Old Negro Cemetery – St-Jacques Street at St-Pierre Street in Old Montreal http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=826

Dufferin Square Cemetery – Dorchester Boulevard at St. Laurent Boulevard http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=828

Montreal Old Military Cemetery – Papineau Street at Lafontaine Street in Southeast Montreal  http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=831

St. Mary’s Anglican Burial Ground – Malo Street and Bordeaux Street in Southeast Montreal  http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=837

St-Hélène Island Old Military Cemetery http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=846

St. Stephen’s Old Anglican Cemetery Lachine  http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=2081

Goose Village Ancient Irish Cemetery   http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=2717

Field of Honor Military Cemetery Pointe Claire   http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=858

Lakeview Memorial Gardens Pointe Claire  http://www.leslabelle.com/Cimetieres/AfficherCim.asp?MP=E3&CID=861

Research: Jacques Gagné

Additional writing: Janice Hamilton

 

 

 

 

 

The Jamieson Sampler

There’s a mystery behind the sampler I inherited from my great, great grandmother.
The sampler itself is quite lovely and very detailed, most of the colours still vibrant today. It is edged with a border of stylized red roses. Inside are the traditional bands of letters and numbers in various stitches, along with a large two-storied house, trees, birds, animals, two baskets of flowers and a verse about the challenges of life. The creator’s name is written clearly: Jane Jamieson, Her Sampler, Quebec and a date. 1819? 1844? The numbers are unclear and therein lies the mystery.
Jane Jamieson was born in 1818 in Drum, Ireland to Samuel Jamieson and Jane Stewart. A sampler date of 1819 is therefore not possible, Jane would have been an infant.
Jane’s father was a tenant farmer and according to family legend, had at one time belonged to the Irish Constabulary. He was also a Protestant and a Loyalist. After suffering a series of irritating incidents at the hands of his Irish landlord, Samuel decided to quit Ireland and take his family to where he could farm his own land. In 1836 he, his wife, and their six children immigrated to Canada.
The Jamiesons, along with twenty-six other families, settled in the “highlands” of Megantic County south of Quebec City. Samuel was given Lot 5 S.W. on the First Range of Inverness Township in what was to become known as South Ireland (now Saint-Jean-de-Brebeuf). Their first home was an old cabin that an earlier squatter had left behind.
The land grants were part of a complex government scheme, beginning in 1791 and now known to be largely unworkable, to settle the vast wilderness between Quebec City and the American border. It took until 1869 before Samuel’s 100-acre grant was finally legalized in his name.
Life in Inverness was not easy. The settlers were expected to cut down the forest and unearth rocks to build their homes and to farm. The winters were long and brutal.
They were also very isolated. Craig’s Road, the dirt road to and from Quebec City, was mountainous, narrow, and heavily rutted with the only means of transportation being by foot, by ox cart or, in winter, by sleigh. It could take three days to reach Quebec or up to a full week when hauling a load of wood or charcoal to sell.
Two of Samuel’s daughters eventually left Inverness to find employment in the city. Both Jane and Sarah went into service. Jane worked two jobs, house maid and parlour maid, for a cash total of $3.00 a month.
In 1846 Jane married William Kelly, a wealthy coal merchant from Quebec City, and became mistress of her own home. There is no record of how they met and courted. Perhaps Jane worked in his family home. Jane and William had five children: James, Eliza, Samuel, Annie and Emma, my great grandmother.
If the date on the sampler is actually 1844, then Jane made the sampler as an adult, two years before her marriage, and not as a child as was the norm at the time. She perhaps learned the various stitches from a fellow domestic, or even her mistress, and created the sampler in her free time, likely something to be tucked away in her hope chest until the day she married. The large house in the sampler may have been the one in which she was employed. One might even suggest that the trees, the birds and the animals were reminiscent of her earlier life in Inverness. So too might have been the reference to the challenges that she “would overcome in the by and by”.

Sources:
Jamieson Harper, Helen. The Jamieson Family, 1995 (part of a research project by Gwen Barry Rawlings)
Barry Rawlings, Gwen. The English 180 years in rural Quebec-Megantic. The Canadian Genealogist, Vol. 3, No.2, 1981
The Kelly Family Bible – now owned by the writer

The Dowry

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Maria Roy Crepeau and three daughters and a granddaughter in front of 72 Sherbrooke West in 1926 or so.

In the Edwardian Age, an ambitious young man, however resourceful, usually needed a solid financial foundation to kick-start his career.  If he didn’t have family money, he had to marry well. Take my grandfather, Jules Crépeau, (1873-1938). The son of a mere house painter, he rose up in 30 years from Messenger Boy in the Health Department to Director of City Services, the top civil servant at Montreal City Hall.

Jules didn’t have the advantage of a superior education; indeed, he completed his regular studies at night. He did have a workaholic nature, an affable disposition, a memory like a steel trap,*1 as well as a connection to the powerful French Canadian industrialists, the Forgets.

New information I found on the Internet reveals that the make-or-break-point for young Jules was in 1901, the year of his marriage. Back then, Jules was making only $600 a year, not a terrible salary for a single man, but certainly not enough to get married on.*2 So, Jules, like so many others, had to choose his wife very carefully.

My grandmother, Maria Roy, the daughter of a master butcher, brought a huge $40,000 dowry to their 1901 marriage, so I’m told. The next year, Jules had a house built for them on Amherst, near Ontario Street, and by a noted architect, at that.*3 Maria’s money!

Lovell’s Directory shows that in 1905 the Crépeau family moved to a tony stretch of St. Hubert Street.  Jules is listed as Head Clerk.  City Hall.   In 1918, they moved to St. Denis Street, just a few doors down from J. A. Brodeur, “Montreal’s Napoleon,” and Head of the Executive Committee. My grandfather was, by then, Second Assistant City Clerk, with a salary of $2,500 -$3,500.

 

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Crépeaus around 1918. My mother wasn’t born yet. Doesn’t Jules, center, look stressed?

In 1921, Jules was promoted to the newly-minted post of Director of City Services*4, almost tripling his salary to $8,000, and soon thereafter, to $10,000. In 1922, his family moved to a three storey greystone at 72 Sherbrooke West.

It’s during this period, the Roarin’ Twenties, that my grandmother, Maria, finally started earning dividends on her dowry, taking  shopping trips to New York City to stock up on bourgeois bric-a-brac like marble urns, porcelain statuary, and art nouveau lamps; a complement to the whole roomful of ‘gifts’ the family received from various community groups, especially at Christmas. Jules and Maria needed a good supply of breakables. Family legend has it that the crockery flew over the stairs throughout their tumultuous 37 year marriage.

mtflo.PNG

Aunt Flo posing in front of some Crépeau bric-a-brac on Harvard in the late 1940’s. The marble bust of three children actually ended up in my mother’s possession, gracing our upper duplex apartment in the 1960’s, but rather out of place among the melamine furnishings and artwork from Woolworth’s. Today, I own the orange art nouveau-deco Le Verre Francais “Amourettes” vase at top right.

In 1931, Jules Crépeau was forced to resign by the new populist Mayor Camillien Houde, but not before negotiating a huge life pension of $8,000 a year. But, soon,  my grandfather, who had no hands-on business experience, lost all of his savings with bad investments.*5  In 1937, Jules also lost his pension when Montreal City Hall passed an emergency bill to abolish it as a cost-saving measure. *6

Just two weeks later, Grandpapa was hit by a car driven by a plain clothes city policeman. He died the next year from complications. Jules probably threatened someone with a long reach.

Living out her life in the final family home on Harvard in Notre Dame de Grace, Jules’ wife, Maria Roy Crépeau (1879-1951) never complained about her situation as an impoverished widow, and this despite the fact her fat dowry financed the first years of the choppy Crépeau-Roy merger. Still, I suspect her story wasn’t at all unique, especially in the Depression Era.

Jules Crepeaurue.PNG

Rue Jules Crépeau, Ahunsic, Montreal. Designated in the 1980’s. Funny story. In the late 80’s, when my husband and I were buying our first computer, the ONLY place in Montreal we knew that sold them was in  Ahunsic, where we seldom ventured. We got lost and stumbled upon this road and park. I had to find a phone booth to phone my mother to tell her that a street had been named after her father. Serendipity or what? Jules’ nemesis, Camillien Houde, has the huge road winding through the mountain named after him.

park.PNG

  1. Le Devoir was the only Montreal newspaper to publish a long obit of my grandfather, in 1938, saying that Jules was the go-to guy for any information about how City Hall ran. Affable is their term.
  2. The 1911 census shows that a $600 a year salary was average/above average for a family. Many era workers were ‘day workers’ with unsteady employment, but, even that $600 salary was not enough for the big families of the era to live on. Terry Copp, the sociologist who wrote An Anatomy of Poverty,claims that $1500. was the minimum salary for a family to live in dignity in Montreal in 1910.  In the Edwardian Era, in England and elsewhere, a working class couple might start out in good shape, with a decent salary for a small family, but as more and more kids came, the family fell into poverty.  Such might have been Jules’ fate, save for this huge dowry.
  3. Louis Zephirin Gauthier specialized in churches. His partner was a Monsieur Roy, so maybe he was a relation. Back then few Montrealers owned their own home, in the 20 percent range. Since 1899, male renters could vote in the municipal elections; women had to be single and own their home to vote. Montreal has long been known as a city of renters, but, just lately, this appears to be changing.
  4. The post of Director of City Services was created in 1921 after much deliberation and input from citizens to ensure an equitable distribution of money among the city districts. The post was a liaison between the seven city departments and the Executive Committee. Newspaper accounts of the time reveal that my Grandfather’s office did everything from organizing events for the visiting Royal Princes to being on the City Clean-Up Committee, to testifying in Quebec with respect to Private Bills. When someone had a beef at City Hall, they wrote to his office. My grandfather was the first to testify at the inquiry in to the fatal Laurier Palace Fire, in January 1927, which was ironic, as I suspect  the fire may have been started by organized crime to get at him. (Just my theory, though.)
  5. Jules’ brother, Isadore, Insurance broker and VP Of United Theatre Amusements, the company that erected many of the famous 1920 era movie houses in Montreal, ‘fell’ out of his 7th floor office while waving for his chauffeur in 1933.
  6. Kristian Gravenor, journalist at Coolopolis.blogspot.ca http://coolopolis.blogspot.ca/2017/01/ndg-coincidence-undercover-cop-slams.html wrote a bit about Jules and dug out the info about the cancellation of his pension.
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