Genealogy, New France, Quebec, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal

Seigneuries of the Charlevoix and the Saguenay

Beginning in 1535, long before the establishment of Nouvelle France by Samuel de Champlain, Europeans traded goods for furs with the indigenous people in the region referred to as the Royaume (kingdom) du Saguenay (1535-1842).

For centuries, the fur traders had complete control of the Saguenay River and the Lac-Saint-Jean regions of Quebec. Because the fur industry was so dominant, farming was forbidden in the Lac-Saint-Jean area until the 1850s.

The Charlevoix refers to the area of boreal forest along the north shore of the St. Lawrence River, northeast of Quebec City, including present-day towns such as La Malbaie. The Saguenay River, which flows south from Lac Saint-Jean, enters the St. Lawrence near the village of Tadoussac.

 

Mouth of the Saguenay River at Tadoussac; Janice Hamilton photo

The attached research guide lists the fur trading companies that operated in Nouvelle-France and Québec, from the first such company established in France in 1614 to the Hudson Bay Company in 1854.

In 1835, 1,830 young farmers from the south shore of the St. Lawrence and the Charlevoix region signed a petition sent to Governor Archibald Acheson of Gosford, requesting access to lands in the Lac-Saint-Jean region. When Acheson and later governors did not react to the petition, many young Quebecers moved to the New England States and other parts of the United States in order to seek jobs.

In the late 1850s, the fur trade declined and the fur trading companies lost their political influence. Finally, the Lac-Saint-Jean and upper Saguenay areas were opened to agriculture, however, by this time, the seigneurial system had been abolished across Quebec.

This 23-page PDF includes a list of the seigneurs and business leaders who controlled the Charlevoix and Saguenay areas for almost two centuries. It lists regional cemeteries and briefly describes the counties and towns in the area. It includes a list of the fur trading companies that operated in the region and a list of the notaries who prepared documents such as business contracts and wills. At the end of the guide you will find contact information for the archives and historical societies found in these regions.

See the research guide here: seigneuries of charlevoix, chicoutimi and saguenay

 

 

french-canadian, Genealogy, New France, Online learning, Quebec, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal

Jacques Gagné’s Research Interests in 2018 and 2019

2018 was a busy year for genealogy researcher Jacques Gagné, so if you missed any of his posts, here is a recap of his work and a look ahead to 2019.

For many years, Jacques was a volunteer researcher at the Quebec Family History Society, so he has a broad knowledge of genealogical records in Quebec. He is particularly knowledgeable about resources at the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ), finding notarial records, searching for ancestors in France and anything to do with the Huguenots.

He is now on the far side of 80 and his eye sight is not what it used to be, so the amount of research he has accomplished for Genealogy Ensemble is all the more impressive. He is passionate about what he does and he just keeps pushing ahead. The list of projects he would like to do in the future is almost as long as the list of his past achievements.

                 Jacques Gagné

Jacques’ work is actually a collective effort. He does all the hard work of exploring the Internet and putting together the research guides, while Claire Lindell and Janice Hamilton (me) revise them, edit the introductions and post everything online. I took a year off between the spring of 2017 and April 2018, which is why there is a gap in his posts.

The major research guides posted in 2018 focused on one main theme: the seigneuries of Quebec. From the time New France was created in the 1600s until the mid-1800s, most land in Quebec was owned by a few individuals known as seigneurs. They were usually French aristocrats, wealthy merchants or military leaders. Most ordinary Quebecers were tenant farmers living on the seigneuries. Jacques identifies the seigneurs and seigneuries in each region, and the notaries who practised there. He also includes a list of cemeteries in each area and repositories for archival material and other resources.

Another post from 2018 was a list of notaries who practised in the years after Quebec came under British rule, between 1760 and 1848. He also put together research tips for finding Huguenot ancestors in France, tips for searching at the BAnQ and French municipal archives, and a heads up on a wonderful online resource, the New France Archives from Library and Archives Canada, nouvelle-france.org.

Jacques has been hard at work for several months on a new series of guides for 2019 on the merchants, ship owners and fur traders of New France. This series looks at the men who did business in New France. Many of them were born in France but married and died in North America, and some were also notaries or played other important roles in the new world. The series includes a post about their ports of departure and their trading partners back in France, as well as background on the trading companies they were associated with.

He is also working on a new series of posts updating his old research guide to the Irish Catholic churches of Quebec (https://genealogyensemble.com/2014/05/20/irish-catholic-churches-of-quebec/). Meanwhile, guides to ancestors in the Charlevoix and Gaspe regions, and more tips on searching in France are coming soon.

If you missed some of Jacques’ past compilations, or are having trouble finding something you noticed several months ago, our blog has several features that makes searching easy.

On the right hand side of the screen, under the Geneabloggers logo and before Categories, there is a Search box. Enter any terms that you might think will take you to a post you are trying to find, such as the name of a region, as well as Gagné. (It will work without the accent.) If you find an article of interest and open it up to its full length, you will find suggestions for related articles at the bottom of the page.

You can also look down that column on the right of your screen until you come to Jacques’ name (it is the fourth name in the list) and click on it. You can then scroll backwards through all his posts. When you get to the bottom of a page, click on Older Posts.

Finally, below all the authors’ names on the right is a search function called Archives. It brings up all our posts from each month.

Thank you for following us since 2014, and good luck with your research in 2019.

Genealogy, Quebec, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal

Townships of Pontiac, Gatineau Counties, plus the Township of Hull

Prior to the arrival of the first European settlers, the area around the Gatineau hills of Quebec, north and west of Ottawa, was the home of the Anishnabe Algonquin First Nations people. Between about 1800 and 1900, western Quebec was settled by British, American, Irish Protestant, Scottish, Irish Catholic, French Canadian and Germanic families. The Germanic settlers had a strong presence in this region. To my knowledge, there were few Loyalists or Huguenots.

Prior to 1845, people and goods were transported primarily by barge along the Ottawa River, which separates Quebec and Ontario. The steamboat that operated on the Ottawa River between Montreal and Ottawa could not manage the rapids between Carillon and Grenville, so in 1854, the Carillon and Grenville Railway, a short 12-mile-long portage railway, was organized.

Prior to 1845, when they purchased land, finalized business deals or wrote their wills, the settlers of western Quebec likely dealt with notaries from Montreal, and perhaps those in Vaudreuil and Rigaud. The section of this compilation that lists notaries begins in 1845, since the Judicial District of Hull was a late-comer among judicial districts across the province.

Today, this region is well served by two superb archives and four regional genealogical societies. Contact details for all these places can be found in the attached compilation.

BAnQ Gatineau – Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec

LAC – Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa

OGS – Ottawa Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society

SGO – Société de généalogie de l’Outaouais

Gatineau Valley Historical Society

Pontiac Archives (genealogy society, located in Shawville, QC)

See: Townships of Pontiac and Gatineau Counties plus the the township of Hull

The contents of this 23-page compilation are as follows:

Page 1  the settlers (including farmers, businessmen, militia officers, politicians)

Page 3  the counties in 1791

Page 4  the townships in chronological sequence

Page 11 regional cemeteries

Page 13 Outaouais region (a list of cities, towns, villages)

Page 14 description of notarial records

Page 15 the notaries

Page 22 area archives and genealogical resource centres

 

 

France, Genealogy, New France, Quebec, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal, United States

Research Help for French Louisiana Sources

There were strong ties between Quebec and Louisiana in the 18th century. Louisiana was then part of New France, having been established by the French to block the British from expanding their influence westward in North America.

Many settlers who went to the southern part of the United States originated from the same regions in France as the French Canadians and the Acadians. But few Quebec historians or genealogists have focused on the links between the families of New France and those who settled in Louisiana.

An example of someone with personal links to both places was Pierre de Rigaud de Vaudreuil de Cavagnial, Marquis de Vaudreuil (1698-1778). His father was of noble descent, from the Languedoc region of France, and Pierre was born at Quebec, where his father served as governor-general of New France. Pierre served as governor of Louisiana from 1742 to 1753, and he was the last governor-general of New France, between 1755 and 1760.

Historian Mélanie Lamotte wrote an article about primary sources in North America and France for the early modern history of Louisiana when she was studying at the Cambridge University in the U.K. She currently teaches at Stanford University, and her  Stanford website describes this article, “A Guide to Early Modern French Louisiana Sources” as providing “much-needed guidance on identifying and using French Louisiana sources. It lists the sources available and investigates their nature, details of access, state of preservation, as well as their state of digitization. It also suggests potential uses and interpretations that might be gleaned from such source material.”

You can download Lamotte’s 26-page guide from either of these two sites:

http://stanford.academia.edu/M%C3%A9lanieLamotte

https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/1810/260104/Lamotte-2016-Collections_A_Journal_for_Museum_and_Archives_Professionals-VoR.pdf?sequence=1

France, Genealogy, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal

Finding Ancestors in French Municipal Archives

The attached 43-page PDF addresses the Archives communales de France, also known as the Archives municipales de France. This is the second most important group of archives in France for tracing the families of New France and Acadia. The 95 Archives départementales de France are the number one source of information addressing French Canadians, Acadians, Franco Americans, Franco Ontarians and others. (See also, Researching Your French Ancestors Online, posted May 13, 2018, https://genealogyensemble.com/2018/05/13/researching-your-french-ancestors-online/)

There are some 400 municipal archives. I have selected the 124 largest, including archives that offer online access to some files, or at least an online description of the contents.

In 1792, the Assemblée législative de France (The Legislative Assembly of France) took away the responsibility for issuing birth, marriage and death registers from the curés (priests) and gave these duties to local mairies (city halls). At about the same time, a new civil register of France was created addressing acts of birth, marriage, divorce and death. This register was named the Registre de l’état-civil, and the documents were issued by the city halls.

Subsequently, when many cities and towns created their own archives communales (municipal archives), these local municipal archives were assigned responsibility to safeguard the civil registers.

After the creation of the 95 Archives départementales de France, a great number of the local archives communales (municipal archives) turned over their actes de l’état-civil, or copies of these records, to the regional archives départementales. Other municipal archives did not do so. As a result, some of the files found in municipal archives of France can also be found in the regional archives départementales, while other dossiers cannot be found anywhere else.

The majority of genealogy societies in France work closely with their local archives communales. Many of these genealogy societies share the same building or adjacent building to the archives communales of their region.

Here is the link to the PDF: Archives communales de France – 2018-09-04 Rev

Genealogy, New France, Quebec, Resources Outside of Montreal

Seigneuries of the Lower St. Lawrence and of the Côte-du-Sud

If some of your ancestors lived along the south shore of the Lower St. Lawrence River (the Bas Saint-Laurent, as it is often called today,) the attached PDF compilation is designed to help you learn more about their lives.

See PDF:  Seigniories of the Lower St. Lawrence – Revised Version 2018-09-03

The river is tidal here, and so broad that the far north shore is hardly visible. This beautiful area of rolling farmland and salt marshes has been settled for generations, with many residents making a living fishing, building boats and transporting goods and people on the river.

south shore egret
South shore of the Lower St. Lawrence River

Until the 1850s, almost all the land was owned by a few individuals, known as seigneurs, who rented it out to the censitaires, or tenant farmers. Most seigneurs were honest and caring individuals who took care of their tenants. They granted lands to the settlers and financed their first years with money, food, cattle and other animals, farm equipment, wood-cutting tools, building tools and rifles.

In return, the censitaires would repay on a yearly basis their seigneur with beaver furs and other types of fur. They also repaid them with hard-wood, a precious commodity in the 17th century in Europe, for most hard-wood forests no longer existed on the European continent. If the seigneur and his family resided on the seigneury, the censitaires would bring them eggs and meat, as well as fresh milk.

south shore famrland
Farmland along the south shore of the Lower St. Lawrence

Many of the seigneurs on the attached list were merchants or fur traders, and obtained most of their revenue from the sale of wild furs and hard-wood. Some were importers and exporters and dealt with merchants in French port cities such as La Rochelle, Bordeaux, Rouen and Le Havre.

The compilation on the PDF attached includes six main sections:

The Seigneurs: this section focuses on the historic landowners on the south shore of the Lower St. Lawrence, including links to biographies of these individuals.

Regions: the geographic regions described in this compilation are Montmagny, l’Islet, Kamouraska, Témiscouata, Rivière-du-Loup, Les Basques, Rimouski, Neigette, La Mitis (Métis), Matapedia and Matane in the Gaspé.

Cemeteries: a list of historic cemeteries in this area.

Notaries: this compilation includes the names of notaries who worked in this region, the places and years they practised, and the archives where their acts can be found today. The notaries handled important legal documents for people, including wills, marriage contracts, business agreements, land rental and sales agreements, and protests in cases of disagreement.

Bibiothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ): locations and contact information for the archives, and how to order documents online.

Genealogical and historical societies in the region: contact information

With regard to the notaries listed in the attached PDF, the majority of the notarial acts can be obtained through the BAnQ online (free, http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna/notaires/ or http://www.banq.qc.ca/archives/genealogie_histoire_familiale/genealogie_banq/guide/archives-notariales/index.html), FamilySearch.org (free), or Ancestry.com (subscription). Ancestry has two distinct databases covering different time periods during the lifetime of a notary. Also listed are the notarial acts which can be obtained through Généalogie Québec (Drouin Institute online), (https://www.genealogiequebec.com/en/.

For each notary selected, if a URL address has been posted, this indicates that the genealogy provider’s online databases contains notarial acts. If a URL address has not been posted, this simply indicates that the provider does not own fonds of this particular notary.

Genealogy, New France, Quebec, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal

The Seigneuries and Townships of Beauce, Bellechasse, Dorchester and Lotbinière

(Note, this is my last post until September. I have many more compilations ready to post then. Meanwhile, happy summer! Jacques)

The region south of the St. Lawrence River between Quebec City and the U.S. border is a tranquil area of forests and farmland. The main highway hugs the shore of the broad St. Lawrence, crossing tributaries such as the Chaudière River, and the land rises gently to the south into the Appalachian Mountains. Today, this area is known as the Chaudière-Appalaches region of Quebec.

The region has a long history of human habitation. Before the 1600s, the people of the Abenaki First Nation lived here. The French founded Quebec City in 1608 and started to grant large tracts of land called seigneuries to aristocrats and military officers. Each seigneury was long and narrow so it could border the St. Lawrence River, the only transportation corridor. Most of the early Europeans were men, including soldiers and fur traders, and the population remained small. In 1663, women arrived in the colony, chose husbands and started families. The population of New France grew quickly.

In 1759, the British defeated the French at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, and a new era of British rule began. Chaudière-Appalaches saw many new settlers arrive from England, Scotland and Ireland, and for the most part they got along well with their French-speaking neighbours. Today, the area remains primariiy French-speaking.

This 59-page guide in PDF format is designed to help you find the records of people who lived in this region. Click on this link to access the PDF:

The_Seigneuries of Beauce Lotbiniere Dorchester and Bellechasse

Contents:

  1. 1 Information on the seigneurs who owned much of the land, including the Lotbinière and Taschereau families.
  2. 5 Descriptions and histories of the region’s seigneuries.
  3. 20 Descriptions of the area’s townships, which were established by the British and date from the 1790s and 1800s. This guide includes links to the churches and cemeteries in these townships.
  4. 27 Descriptions and history of the counties in the region, including when they were created and how they were named and settled.
  5. 30 Towns that changed names over the last 240 years. If the town where your ancestor lived had different names over the years, this will help you identify it.
  6. 44 A list of regional cemeteries in each county or municipality.
  7. 45 Notaries prepared a variety of legal documents for their clients, including land transfers, wills and business agreements. The list of notaries shows where each one worked, the years he practiced and the location of his records at the archives today.
  8. 59 Contact information for the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec in Quebec City.
Genealogy, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal

Notaries of Lower Canada 1760-1848

If your ancestors lived in Quebec in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, you can discover a great deal about them from the records of their land transactions, wills, marriage contracts, apprenticeships and other documents that were prepared by notaries.

The key to researching these documents is to find the notary your ancestor hired — not an easy task since so many notaries practiced in Quebec over these three centuries. But if your ancestor’s first language was English or a language other than French, the search might be easier. Many notaries practiced in French only.

The PDF link at the bottom of this introduction will take you to a relatively short list of notaries who practiced between 1760 and 1848, roughly the period when Quebec was known as Lower Canada and was under British rule. These notaries prepared documents for residents who were of British, Scottish, Irish and American origin (both Loyalists and non-Loyalists), as well as people with Germanic, Dutch or Scandinavian roots. In addition, they served Huguenots who had lived in England before coming to Canada.

Notarial records are stored in the archives of the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ), and you can find them either online or on microfilm at the various branches of the archives.

The BAnQ has 10 repositories across the province, the largest being in Montreal and Quebec City. The others locations are in Sherbrooke, Trois Rivières and other smaller cities. The larger a BAnQ repository is, the smaller the online content of notarial acts because members of the public can more easily visit the big city archives in person. That means that, if your ancestor used the services of a notary in Gaspé, for example, his records are more likely to be online than if the notary was based in Quebec City.

At least 70% of the documents written and recorded by notaries in Quebec are available online. The main online repositories are:

http://www.banq.qc.ca/accueil/index.html?language_id=1  BAnQ online

Ancestry.com – Drouin Collection of notarial acts

Ancestry.com – BAnQ Collection of notarial acts

FamilySearch.org – BAnQ Collection of notarial acts (different years than the BAnQ online database of notarial acts)

http://www.genealogiequebec.com/en – Quebec Genealogy (Drouin Institute online)

There is a list of notaries on the BAnQ website at http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna/notaires/index.html?a=v_z

You can search for a notary by place and browse his indexes by year. Starting with these indexes might be a good strategy, especially if the notary did not have a very busy practice, or if you know approximately what year your ancestor married, died or made a business agreement.

The URL http://bibnum2.banq.qc.ca/bna/notaires/fichiers/portail/html/liste.html takes you to another list. If a notary on this list has an asterisk, clicking on the name will allow you to view his documents on the BAnQ website.

PDF:  Notaries of Quebec and Lower Canada 1760-1848

Genealogy, Quebec, Resources Outside of Montreal

The Irish of Frampton, Quebec

Irish immigrants to the province of Quebec arrived at the port of Quebec City from the earliest days of the 19th century. From there, the British authorities began the process of allocating lands to these mostly poor Irish settlers. Some went to Montreal, where many of the men were hired to work on big construction projects such as the Lachine Canal in the early 1820s. Others settled in small hamlets in Portneuf, Lotbinière, Drummond, Gaspé, Huntingdon, Chateauguay, Joliette, Maskinongé, Montcalm, Napierville, Richmond and Deux Montagnes counties, as well as in the Ottawa Valley region. Many Irish Protestants moved further west, to Upper Canada.

Marianna O’Gallagher (1929-2010) wrote numerous books about the Irish of Quebec, and one of her texts inspired Rev. John A. Gallagher to write St. Patrick’s ParishQuebec. This article recalls the communal life of the Irish Catholic families of Quebec City before their final departures to various communities across the province. You can find this article online at http://www.umanitoba.ca/colleges/st_pauls/ccha/Back%20Issues/CCHA1947-48/Gallagher.pdf

The region of Frampton, in Dorchester County, was the site of one of the earliest rural settlements of Irish Catholic families in Quebec. Today, Frampton is in a beautiful area known as the Beauce, south of Quebec City, and the community is almost completely French-speaking, but 150 years ago things were very different. You will find a 62-page text entitled Irish Life in Rural Quebec: a history of Frampton, by Patrick M. Redmond, online at http://www.framptonirish.com/frampton/content/Irish_Life.pdf It includes the names of many individuals, as well as statistics, extensive footnotes and a bibliography.

The Frampton Irish Website, http://www.framptonirish.com/frampton/Whats_New.cfm, written by Dennis McLane, includes a database of more than 12,000 names. This database has also been posted to the public member trees section of Ancestry.com. Irish Needles, McLane’s three-volume history of the Frampton Irish, is available from http://www.Amazon.com. These three books are:

Volume I – Irish Needles: The History of the Frampton Irish – 245 pages – 3,600 families – 13,200 people > $20 US

Volume II – Genealogy Compendium of the Frampton Irish, A-K – 405 pages > $25 US

Volume III – Genealogy Compendium of the Frampton Irish. L-Z – 389 pages > $25 US

Genealogy, Quebec, Resources Outside of Montreal

The Channel Islanders of Eastern Quebec

Société de généalogie et d’histoire de Rimouski

http://www.sghr.ca/en/publications

418-724-3242

sghr@globetrotter.net

The shores of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula, the Magdalen Islands, the North Shore of the Saint Lawrence River and an area of New Brunswick were settled by newcomers from the Channel Islands as early as the 1700s. The Channel Islands include Jersey and Guernsey and lie between Normandy in France and the southern coast of England. The immigrants to Canada were mainly men who came to work in the cod fishery and in shipbuilding enterprises run by entrepreneurs such as Jersey-born Charles Robin and the Janvrin brothers. They married local girls and started families.

Between 1998 and 2005, genealogist Marcel R. Garnier studied these families extensively and published a series of articles about them in the periodical l’Estuaire Généalogique, published by the Société de généalogie et d’histoire de Rimouski.

Garnier died in 2006 and his sister, Claudette Garnier (www.gogaspe.com/gcis/board.html) is the administrator of her late brother’s research material.

The Gaspé Jersey Guernsey Association (http://www.gogaspe.com/gcis/index.html) will conduct family lineage searches for a fee. Contact Suzanne Mauger, president, 418-752-6110. Copies of these magazines are also kept in the library of the Quebec Family History Society in Pointe Claire, Quebec, a suburb of Montreal, http://www.qfhs.ca/index.php.

Here are Jersey and Guernsey family names mentioned in Garnier’s articles:

Item # Estuaire 64 – 1997Les Jersiais et les Guernesiais de Gaspésie et des Iles-de-la-MadeleineChannel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in the regions of Gaspé & the Magdalen Islands – Pages 82 to 88 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Ahier, Alexandre, Ascah, Bailey, Bannier, Bartlert, Bechervaise, Becquet, Bichard, Binet, Bisson, Blackler, Bourgaize, Brehault, Briard, Brien, Brideaux,, Brouard, Cabot, Carrell, Cawley, Clough, Collas, Corbet, Coutanches, Delisle, Dennys, Dolbel, Domaille, Dorey, Du Haume, Dumaresq, Dupreuil, Eden, Ellis, Esnouf, Fairchild, Falle, Fruing, Galliard, Gallichan, Garris (de), Gaudin, Gavey, Godfrey, Gruchy (de), Guignon, Hamon, Handy, Horner, Hotton, Hounsell, Hué, Ingrouville, Janvrin, Jean, Jersey (de), La Marre (de), Langlois, La Perelle (de), Le Four, Le Huray, Le Mesurier, Le Montais Gruchy, Sainte-Croix (de) – Spouses : Alexander, Annett, Ascah, Baker, Baldwin, Bartlett, Bechervaise, Bichard, Blackhall, Boulay, Bray, Carcaud, Clarke, Côté, Coutanches, Couvert, de Gruchy, de Moulpied, Denis, Dion, Eden, Ellis, Flocchart, Fournier, Gasnier, Gaumont, Gavey, Giffard, Gruchy, Haley, Hamilton, Hennessy, Henry-Blampied, Jacques, Janvrin, Jouan, Lacques, Langlois, Le Cornu, Le Four, Lemesurier, Lenfesty. Le Feuvre, Le Grand, Le Huguet, Le Huquet, Le Huray, Le Mesurier, Lemesurier, Lerhe, Létourneau, Le Touzel, Luce, Marion, McCall, McGrath, Morin, Nixon, Ouellet, Pelletier, Priaux, Price, Pruing, Ramsden, Rideout, Roberts, Rose, Salter, Sarre, Savidant, Suddard-Davis, Tapp, Todvin (Tostevin), Tourgis, Touzel, Weary, West, White – 88 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 92 spouses

Item # Estuaire 65 – 1998Les Jersiais et les Guernesiais de Gaspésie et des Iles-de-la-Madeleine Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in the regions of Gaspé & the Magdalen Islands – Pages 4 to 9 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Journeau, Laffoley, Lamprière-Marett, Langford, Langlois, Le Bail, Le Bas, Leboutillier, Lebrun, Lechasseur, Lecornu, LeDain, LeDuc, Lee, Le Four, Le Garignon, Leggo, Legros, Le Guédard, Le Houillier, Le Huquet, Le Huray, Le Lacheur, Lelièvre, Le Maistre, Le Marquand, Le Masurier, Le Messurier, Le Mesurier, Le Mottée, Lenfesty, Le Prévost, Le Sauteur, Le Seeleur (Lescelleur), Le Templier, Le Touzel, Luce, Machon, Marett, Mauger, Minchinton, Mollet, Moulin (Mullin), Noel, Ozanne, Perchard, Pike, Pinel, Pipon, Piton, Priaux, Price, Queripel, Rabey, Robert, Roberts, Ropert, Rose, Roy, Salmon (Salomon), Salter, Sauvage (Savage), Savidant, Shaw, Simon, Slous, Skroeder, Snowman, Thelland, Tourgis, Tupper, Vautier, Vibert, Vigot, Wilson – Spouses : Arthur, Ascah, Averty, Bartlett, Beattie, Bellerive (Couture), Bichard, Bisson, Boone, Bourgaize, Bower, Boyle, Brouard, Burt, Cabot, Caron, Carter, Chevalier, Chiasson, Clark, Coffin, Collas, Coulombe, Couture (Bellerive) Cramahé, de Gaspé, de Gruchy, de La Perelle, Des Garris, Driscoll, Esnouf, Fitzpatrick, Fougère, Gallichan, Gauvreau, Gibbins, Glover, Halley, Hamon, Handy, Henley, Hoyles, Hyman, Kennedy, Killam, Laffoley, Lambert, Le Boutiller, Le Four, Le François, Legros, Le Lacheur, Leggo, Lemarquand, Le Mesurier, Lenfesty, Lepelly, Leruez, Le Touzel, Lockhard, Locket, Machon, Mauger, Mc Callum, Mc Kenzie, Minchinton, Nesbitt, Nicolle, Ozanne, Pendergast, Perry, Pirouet, Poingdestre, Poirier, Priaux, Rabey, Rail, Robert, Roberts, Robin, Rose, Russell, Salter, Simon de Gaspé, Stanley, Stuart, Sweeney, Synnott, Syvret, Taylor, Thompson, Tourgis, Trudel, Vincent, White, Williamson – 111 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 112 spouses.

 

Item # Estuaire 70 – 1999Les Anglo-Normands de la région de La Malbaie en Gaspésie The Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in the region of Malbaie in Gaspé County – Pages 41 to 46 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Agnes, Alexander, Alexandre, Amy, Barette, Becquet, Binet, Bertram, Boucher, Bower, Briard, Burman, Cabot, Cadoret, Carrel, Collas, Coombs, Couls, Creighton, Dallain, de Carteret, de Garris, de La Haye, de La Perelle, de Mouilpied, Devouges, Dorviss (Gossett), Dufeu, Esnouf, Fauvel, Gasnier, Girard, (Gérard), Gossett (Dorviss), Guillaume, Hacquoil, Hammon, Hamon, Hocquard, Hotton, Hubert, Ingrouville, Johnston, Kinsella, Langlais, Laurens, Le Bail, Leblancq, Le Boutillier, Lebrun, Le Coq, Le Couteur, Le Dain, Le Gresley, Le Gros, Lehre, Le Lacheur, Lelièvre, Lemaistre, Le Marquand, Le Masurier dit Mellon, Le Mesurier, LeMontais, Le Mottée, Lepage, Le Patourel, Lequesne, Le Roy, Letouzel, Levesconte, Mabille (Mabe), Machon, Marion, Mauger, Misson, Morrisson, Nicolle, Olivier, Pabasse, Parrée, Payne, Piton, Prével, Powell, Price, Raddley-Walters, Rebindaine, Richardson, Robin, Savage, Ste-Croix, Syborn, Syvret, Touzel, Tupper, Vardon, Vautier, Vibert, Wales, Walters – Spouses : Alexandre, Athot-Forsyth, Beck, Bond, Boyle, Briand, Bunton-Cass, Cabot, Carter, Cassivi, Chicoine, Clark, Cunning, Cyr, David, De Moulpied, Donahue, Doody, Doucet, Dumaresq, Element, Etesse, Francis, Gauthier, Girard, Hamon-Dumaresq, Hardy, Hayden, Hayden-Vardon, Hazelton, Henley, Hotton, Howell, Ingrouville, Johnston, Kennedy, Laffoley, Lamb, Lamy, Lebel, Le Boutillier, Lebrun, Le Cocq, Le Couvet, Legrand, Le Gresley, Le Maistre, Le Marquand, Le Mottée, Lenfesty, Le Page, Lucas, Mc Leay, Mc Carthy, Mc Kenzie, Mc Pherson-Buckley, Miller, Misson, Nicolle, Ogier, Packwood, Perrée, Poingdestre, Priaux, Pruing, Radley-Walters, Rail, Sainte-Croix, Samson, Simard, Suddard, Tapp, Tapp-Lucas, Touzel, Trudel, Vardon, Vautier, Vicaire, Withers, Wright – 131 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 122 spouses

 

Item # Estuaire 72 – 1999Les Anglo-Normands en Gaspésie dans la région de PercéThe Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in the region of Percé in Gaspé County – Pages 103 to 110 & 115 to 116 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Agnes, Ahier, Alexandre, Amy, Annet, Arnold, Aubert, Aubin, Baker, Balleine, Baptiste, Bauche, Baudains, Becquet, Bennett, Bertram, Biard, Bisson, Bossy, Bourgaize, Bower, Brideaux, Brochet, Le Brun, Bunton, Burman, Butlin, Cabot, Camiot, Carcaud, Caudey (Cody), Couilliard, Robin-Dane, De Caen, De Carteret, De Gruchy, De La Cour, De La Perelle, De Moulpied, De Quetteville, Des Reaux, De Veuille, Dufeu, Dumaresq, Duval, Fainton, Fauvel, Filleul (Fyall), Fiott, Fowler, Fruing, Fyott, Gale, Gallichan, Gaudin, Gibaut, Giffard, Godfrey, Gossett, Grindin, Gregory, Gruchy, Gunhall, Hamon, Hardeley, Hacquoil, Henry, Héraux, Hubert, Hué, Huelin, Hughes, Janvrin, Jean, Journeau, Laffoley, Langlois, Laurens, L’Aventure, Le Bas, Leblancq, Lebouthillier, Le Breton, Le Brocq, Le Brun, Le Cocq, Le Cornu, Le Couteur, Le Crinnier, Le Dain, Le Feuvre, Leggo, Le Grand, Le Gresley, Le Gros, Le Gruiek, Le Huray, Lelièvre (Lever), Lenfesty, Le Rossignol, Le Roux, Le Ruez, Le Sueur, Lever, Luce, Manning, Martel, Matthew, Mauger, Mercier, Mourant, Newberry, Nicolle, Noel, Olivier, Ollivier, Orange, Parrée (Perry), Payne, Perrée, Picot, Pinel (Picknell), Powell, Ramier, Remon, Renouf, Richardson, Robin, Robin-Daine, Romeril, Savage, Skelton, De Gruchy-Sutton, Sutton, Tardif, Tostevin, Trachy, Valpy, Vautier, Viel, Vibert, Weary, Wilson – Spouses : Arbour, Baker, Balleine, Barnes, Beaker, Beck, Bélanger, Biard, Bisson, Blackhall, Blake, Bond, Bourget, Boutin, Bower, Bree, Bunton, Butlin, Cass, Chouinard, Clark, Cloutier, Collin, Collins, Cooke, Cronier, de Carteret, de La Perelle, Desreaux, Dobson, Donahue, Dove, Driscoll, Dumaresq, Duthie, Duval, Enricht, Fauvel, Flowers, Flynn, Forsyth, Gallie, Gatain, Gaulin, Gibault, Giffard, Grenier, Hamon, Henley, Henry, Higginson, Horan, Hoyles, Hubert, Jacques, Janvrin, Jeune, Jewell, Kempfer, Laflamme, Laflamme-Chrétien, Lamb, Lambert, Langlois, Lawrence, Le Bailly, Le Bas, Leboutiller, Lebreton, Le Brocq, Le Cocq, Le Couvet, Leduc, Lee, Le Grand, Le Gresley, Lehmann, Le Huquet, Lemprière, Lenfesty, Le Touzel, Lindsay, Loisel, Lord, Lucas, Luce, Mahan, Mailloux, Mallett, Maloney, Maloney-Girard, Marett, Mauger, Mauger-Dobson, Mc Call, Mc Ginnis, Mc Neil, Mercier, Miller, Molloy, Morissey, Nicolle, Ogier, Ouellet, Packwood, Pallot, Phillippe, Pirouet, Piton, Remon, Richard, Robin, Sampson, Savage, Sheenan, Studdard, Sweeney, Ternett, Tostevin, Touzel, Travers, Trudel, Tuzo, Vardon, Vibert-Tuzo, Vickery, Williams – 216 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 163 spouses.

 

Item # Estuaire 75 – 2000 Des Jersiais et des Guernesiais de la Baie-des-Chaleurs The Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in Chaleur Bay in the Gaspé Peninsula –  Pages 84 to 93 Author : Marcel R. Garnier Families : Agnès, Ahier, Alexandre, Amy, Anez, Arnold, Arthur, Aubin, Aubin (Hoben), Baker, Balleine, Baptiste, Barette, Bauche, Baudains, Bean, Beaucamp, Bechervaise, Becquet, Bertram, Biard, Bisson, Blackmore, Blampied, Boizard, Bossy, Bott, Bouillon, Bourgaise, Bower, Bréhaut, Briard, Brideaux, Brochet, Brun (Le), Bunton, Cabot, Camiot, Carcaud, Carey, Carrel, Champion, Chantes, Chedore, Clark, Clarke, Clement, Caudey (Le) (Cody), Collas, Conway, Corbet, Corbin, Couillard, Coutanges, Dallain, Davey, De Caen, De Caux, De Faye, De Forest, Desgarris (Degarie), De Gruchy, De La Cour, De la Haye, De La Mare, De La Perelle, De Ste-Croix, Deslandes, De Veuille, Dolbel, Dubois, Du Feu, Du Haume, Dumaresq, Duval, Egré (Grey), Ennis, Esnouf, Fainton, Falle, Fallu, Fauvel, Filleul, (Fyall), Fiott (Fyott), Flannegon, Fleury, Fowler, Fruing, Gale, Gallichan, Gallie, Garnier, Gaudin, Gavey, Gibaut, Giffard, Godfrey, Gosset, Grandin, Gregory, Grenier (Garnier), Gruchy, Hacquoil – Spouses : Ahier, Alexandre, Almond, Annett, Aston, Athot, Aubin, Baker, Beaudin, Bean, Beebe, Bergeron-d’Amboise, Bertrand, Bisson, Blackhall, Boudreau, Bray, Brotherton, Butlin, Cass, Chedore, Collin, Collins, Cormier, Cyr, Day, Decaen, Deck, de Larosbil, Duguay, Duthie, Forest, Gallichan, Gallie, Gasnier, Gaudin, Gauthier, Gibeaut, Giffard, Guillot, Henley, Hocquard, Holmes, Horan, Janvrin, Journeau, Kempffer, Lambert, Landry, Laurent, Lebel, Leblanc, Leboutillier, Le Breton, Le Brocq, Le Gallais, Legrand, Le Gresley, Lemprière, Lenfesty, Le Touzel, Loisel, Lucas, Main, Mallett, Maloney, Malzard, Mauviel, Mc Grath, Mc Intyre, Mc Kenzie, Michel, Morissey, Munroe, Painchaud, Pallot, Paquette, Philippe, Picot, Poirier, Poulin, Priaux, Remon, Rochon, Rouet, Russell, Scott, Sheehan, Smith, Ste-Croix, Tostevin, Touzel, Trachy, Travers, Turnbull, Tuzo, Watt, Whittorn – 170 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey in addition to 126 spouses

 

Item – Estuaire 76 – 2000Des Jersiais et des Guernesiais de la Baie-des-ChaleursThe Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled in Chaleur Bay in the Gaspé Peninsula – Pages 100 to 110 & 115 to 116 – Author : Marcel R. GarnierFamilies : Hacquoi (Acou), Hacquoi (Acou & Harquail), Hamon, Hardeley, Hardy, Henry, Héraut, Hewittson, Hocquard, Holms (Holmes), Hotton, Hubert, Hué, Huelin, Jandron, Jarnet, Jean, Jenne, Jeune, Journeaux, Labey, Lamy, Langlois (Langlais), L’Arbelestier, Laurens, Laurent, L’Aventure, Lebas, Le Bas, Le Bellier, Leblancq, Le Bœuf, Le Boutillier, Le Breton, Le Brocq, Lebrun (Brown), Lebrun, Le Caux, Le Cocq, Le Cornu, Le Couillard, Le Couteur, Lecras, Le Dain, Le Feuvre, Lefevre, Le Floch, Le Galet, Le Gallais, Le Geyt, Le Grand, Le Gresley, Legros, Le Lièvre, Le Maistre, Le Marquand, Le Martree, Le Masurier, Le Moignan, Le Moignard, Le Mottee, Le Poidvin, Lequesne, Le Rossignol, Lesbirel (Lesbril), Lesbirel (Sperrell), Le Seeleur, Le Sueur, Le Templier, Le Vesconte, Lloyd, Lucas, Luce, Mallet, Malzard, Manning, Mansell, Marett, Martel, Martin, Mauger, Merry, Michel, Morin, Mourant, Mourant (Sutton), Neel, Nicolle, Normand, Norman, Olivier, Orange, Pallot, Park, Paten, Perchard, Picot, Pipon, Pirouet, Piton, Poingdestre, Powell, Prévost, Querrée, Rabasse, Rebindaine, Rimmeur (Ramier), Remon, Renault, Renouf, Riou, Rive, Robin, Romeril, Ropert, Roussel (Roussell), Roy, Sansans (Sauson), Savage, Seale, Sheppard, Skelton, Sious, Sohier, Spratt, Strong, Sutton, Syvret, Syvret (Sivrais), Tardif, Touzel, Trachy, Valpy, Vardon, Vautier, Venemont, Vibert, Vicq, Viel, Vincent, Wales, Weary, Westbrook, Wetherall, Wheaton – Spouses : Acteson, Adams, Allen, Ames, Anglehart, Arbour, Assels, Baker, Balfour, Balleine, Basset, Batson, Beaudin, Bechervaise, Beebe, Bellett, Bisson, Blais, Blampied, Blondel, Bouillon, Bossy, Boucher, Bourget, Boutin, Boyle, Caldwell, Carrel, Carter, Castilloux, Chambers, Chedore, Chiasson, Christie, Clement-Watt, Cocke, Collin, Cooke, Cormier, Couture (Bellerive), Cronier, Cyr, Day, De La Cour, de La Perelle, Doodridge, Dorey, Douglass, Dove, Dufeu, Duguay, Dumaresq, Dupuis, Duval, Element, English, Fiott, Fitzpatrick, Flowers, Foley, Forest, Gallie, Garrett, Gatain, Gaudin, Gaudreau, Gauthier, Girard, Glennan, Glover, Grenier, Hamon, Hellyer, Higginson, Hocquard, Holmes, Holms, Horth, Hotton, Huard, Huntingdon, Jenne, Jewell, Johnson, Kruze, La Brecque, Landry, Larocque, Laurent, LeBailly, Lebas, Lebrun, Le Cornu, Le Couteur, Le Gallais, Legallais, Le Grand, Lehmann, Le Huquet, Le Marchand, Le Marquand, Lemesurier, Lemoignan, Leriche, Le Touzel, Lindsay, Loisel, Mahan, Maher, Mann, Mauger, Mc Ginnis, Mc Rea, Meagher, Michel, Miller, Montgomery, Morissey, Morrissette, Munroe, Nelson, Newman, Payne, Pirouet, Piton, Pluma, Querrée, Rabasse, Robichaud. Robin, Roussy, Scott, Scott-Lindsay, Simon, Smith, Starnes, Ste-Croix, Sullivan, Sweeney, Tostevin, Tourgis, Travers, Tremblay, Trépanier, Tuzo, Valpy, Vardon, Vautier, Vicaire, Vicq, Vigneault, Ward, Weary, Whitton, Williston, Young – 296 male immigrants from Jersey & Guernsey and 195 spouses

 

Item # Estuaire 85 – 2003 – Des Jersiais et des Guernesiais sur la Côte-Nord du fleuve Saint-Laurent – Channel Islanders from Jersey & Guernsey who settled the North Shore of the St. Lawrence River – Pages 4 to 12 – Author : Marcel R. Garnier – Families : Agnès, Ahier, Ayerst, Bailhache, Barette, Bartram, Bechelet, Becquet, Binet, Bisson, Blampied, Bodman, Bray, Briard, Brown, Cabot, Camiot, Carcaud, Carrel (Carroll), Chevalier, Clarke, Clement, Cody (Caudy), Collas, Corbet, Corbey, Coutanches, Darby, de Caen, Degruchy, de La Haye, de la Perelle, de Quetteville, Des Champs, Devouges, Dimmick, Dorey, Duguay, Duhaume, Dumaresq, Durant, Durell, Falle, Fauvel, Fequet, Filleul, Fruing, Gallichan (Gallichon), Gallienne, Garnier, Gaudier, Gaudin, Gauthier, Girard, Godfrey, Grenier (Garnier), Grandin, Hamon (Homan), Hacquoil, Hawco, Hawkins, Hockey (Le Huquet), Hogan, Hounsell, Ingrouville, Jandron, Jarnet, Jennis, Labey, Le Blancq, Leboutillier, Le Brocq, Lebrun, Le Cocq, Le Cornu, Le Couteur, Le Dain, Lefeuvre, Lefloch, Le Gallais, Legeyt, Legrand, Legresley, Legros, Le Huquet, Le Maistre, Lemarquand, Le Marquand, Lemoignan, Lemonnier, Lemottée, Lenfesty, Lehre, Le Rossignol, Leroux, Leruez, Le Sauteur, Le Templier, Letemplier, Luce, Manning, Mansel, Martel, Mauger, Mauger (Monger), Mauger (Munger), Michel, Misson, Morel, Mourant, Newberry, Nicolle (Nichol), Noel, Olivier, Patriarche, Payne, Perrée, Perrée (Perry), Perchard, Perry, Petherick (Patriarche), Picot, Poingdestre, Pope, Prévost, Ramier, Renouf, Robert, Robin, Romeril, Salmon, Salomon, Savage, Skelton, Sutton (de Gruchy), Syvret, Syvret (Sivrais), Touzel, Trachy, Vardon, Vatcher, Vautier, Viel, Vibert, Vincent, Wheaton (Whitton) – Spouses : Anglehart, Athot, Baker, Ballam, Beaudin, Beaudoin, Beck, Beebe, Bernier, Bisson, Blais, Blampied, Bonenfant, Boulet, Boyle, Bréhaut, Buffet, Cabeldu, Cahill, Chambers, Chevalier, Chinic, Coffin, Collin, Cook, Cormier, Couture-Lamonde, Craib, Cummings, Cunning, de La Perelle, Doody, Doucet, Douglass, Duguay, Dulong, Dumaresq, Durvay, Duthie, Element, Fafard, Fixott, Flowers, Foley, Foreman, Gallichan, Gallienne, Gaudin, Gaudion, Gaumont, Gauthier, Gauvreau, Gibaut, Girard, Glenn, Gooseney, Grant, Guillemette, Hallahan, Hamilton, Hayward, Henley, Hocquard, Holms, Horan, Huard, Janvrin, Jean, Jones, Journeau, Keates, Kennedy, Landry, Langlish, Langlois, Larocque, Laurent, Lebouthillier, Leboutillier, Lebreton, Le Breton, Lebrun, Le Gallais, Legrand, Le Gresley, Lemarquand, Lemottée, Lenfesty, Letto, Levallée, Levasseur, Lilly, Loftus, Loisel, Lucas, Mailloux, Major, Mc Sweeney, Menicoll, Mercier, Michaud, Miller, Montgomery, Morency, Morrissette, Mullins, Nérée, Nickerson, Noel, O’Brien, O’Dell, Ouellet, Pagé, Paradis, Parent, Pelletier, Phillips, Piersay, Pike, Poirier, Rail, Robin, Roussy, Samson, Scott, Selesse, Sergent, Simard, Suddard-Davis, Tapp, Taylor, Thelland, Thériault, Touzel, Vallée, Vardon, Vignault, Vinacott, Walker, Whealan, Whittom, Wright – 178 male immigrants from Jersey and Guernsey and 162 spouses

 

Item # Estuaire 942005 – Des Jersiais et des Guernesiais au Nouveau-BrunswickChannel Islanders from Jersy & Guernsey who settled in New Brunswick – Pages 50 to 56 & 60 to 61 – Author : Marcel R. Garnier Families : Ahier, Alexandre, Amy, Amiraux, Blackler, Bosdet, Brien, Brouard, Butler (Le Bouthillier), Cabot, Chedore, Coutanges, Dayne, Desgarris (Degarie), de Gruchy, De Gruchy (De Gruchie), de La Garde, de La Perelle, de Quetteville, de Ste-Croix, Diney, Dolbel, du Fleur, Dufour, Duhamel, Dumaresq, Duval, Egré (Grey), Edwards, Ereault (Hereault), Falle, Foudrup, Fruing, Gibaut, Godfrey, Gravey, Hamon, Hamon (Hammond), Hacquail, Hacquoil, Harquail (Macquoil), Henry, Hocquard, Hubert, Huelin, Hughes, Knight, Laffoley, Laffoly, Le Bas, Le Bouthillier (Lebouthillier), Le Boutillier, Lebrocq, Le Caux, Le Couteur, Lecouteur, Lefloch, Le Furgey, Lefurgey, Le Gallais (Du Galet). Le Grand, Legresley, Legros, Le Lacheur, Le Maistre, Lemarquind, Le Marquand, Le Mesurier, Le Poidvin, Leriche, Lesueur, Letemplier, Leventure, Lie, Lloyd, Locke, Luce, Mahy, Mauger (Majer), Michel, Monet, Morel, Morris, Mourant, Nichols, Oliver, Orange, Painter, Pallot, Picot, Pirouet, Piton, Powell, Quennault (Canot), Querrée (Kerry – Carey – Querry), Rabasse, Ramier (Rimeur), Renouf, Rive, Robert, Robin, Sarre, Sheppard, Sommany, Stavidant,, Strong, Studely, Syvret (Sivret), Tardif, Thomas, Tourgis, Vaudin, Vautier, Veal (Viel), Vibert, Vicq, Vigot, Vincent, Warne, Weary, Williams, Young – Spouses : Ahier, Albert, Alexandre, Arsenault, Beebe, Bisson, Ballam, Blackhall, Blondel, Borey, Boudreau, Boutin, Boyle, Brien, Brotherton, Brown, Carter, Charleston, Chedore, Chiasson, Christie, Comeau-Baldwin), Daiguillot (Guilot), Day, de La Parelle, Duclos, Duguay, Dumaresq, Duval, Edwards, Fauvel, Fitzpatrick, Forest, Gallie, Gaudreau, Giraud, Glover, Godin, Guillot, Haché, Hains, Hamilton, Hayden, Hellyer, Higginson, Hollands, Holms, Hotton, Hubert, Huelin, Jennie, Johnson, Kruse, Landry, Langlois, Lateigne, Lawlor-Dwyer, Leblanc, Lebreton, Lebrocq, Le Gallais, Maillet, Mailloux, Mallet, Mann, Many, Mc Carthy, Mc Kay-Hubon, Mc Kenzie, Mousse, Mowatt, Newman, Newton, Nixon, O’Connor, Poulin, Prévost, Quennault (Canot), Querrée, Radley (Walters), Robichaud, Stewart, Sutherland, Thériault, Thomas, Tourgis, Vautier, Vibert (Tuzo), Vincent, Walker, Ward, Warnes, Williston, Winterflood,, Yvonne – 168 male immigrants from Jersey and Guernsey and 120 spouses 

 

The above research guide was researched and compiled by Jacques Gagné

gagne.jacques@sympatico.ca

2016-03-05