french-canadian, Genealogy, New France, Online learning, Quebec, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal

Jacques Gagné’s Research Interests in 2018 and 2019

2018 was a busy year for genealogy researcher Jacques Gagné, so if you missed any of his posts, here is a recap of his work and a look ahead to 2019.

For many years, Jacques was a volunteer researcher at the Quebec Family History Society, so he has a broad knowledge of genealogical records in Quebec. He is particularly knowledgeable about resources at the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ), finding notarial records, searching for ancestors in France and anything to do with the Huguenots.

He is now on the far side of 80 and his eye sight is not what it used to be, so the amount of research he has accomplished for Genealogy Ensemble is all the more impressive. He is passionate about what he does and he just keeps pushing ahead. The list of projects he would like to do in the future is almost as long as the list of his past achievements.

                 Jacques Gagné

Jacques’ work is actually a collective effort. He does all the hard work of exploring the Internet and putting together the research guides, while Claire Lindell and Janice Hamilton (me) revise them, edit the introductions and post everything online. I took a year off between the spring of 2017 and April 2018, which is why there is a gap in his posts.

The major research guides posted in 2018 focused on one main theme: the seigneuries of Quebec. From the time New France was created in the 1600s until the mid-1800s, most land in Quebec was owned by a few individuals known as seigneurs. They were usually French aristocrats, wealthy merchants or military leaders. Most ordinary Quebecers were tenant farmers living on the seigneuries. Jacques identifies the seigneurs and seigneuries in each region, and the notaries who practised there. He also includes a list of cemeteries in each area and repositories for archival material and other resources.

Another post from 2018 was a list of notaries who practised in the years after Quebec came under British rule, between 1760 and 1848. He also put together research tips for finding Huguenot ancestors in France, tips for searching at the BAnQ and French municipal archives, and a heads up on a wonderful online resource, the New France Archives from Library and Archives Canada, nouvelle-france.org.

Jacques has been hard at work for several months on a new series of guides for 2019 on the merchants, ship owners and fur traders of New France. This series looks at the men who did business in New France. Many of them were born in France but married and died in North America, and some were also notaries or played other important roles in the new world. The series includes a post about their ports of departure and their trading partners back in France, as well as background on the trading companies they were associated with.

He is also working on a new series of posts updating his old research guide to the Irish Catholic churches of Quebec (https://genealogyensemble.com/2014/05/20/irish-catholic-churches-of-quebec/). Meanwhile, guides to ancestors in the Charlevoix and Gaspe regions, and more tips on searching in France are coming soon.

If you missed some of Jacques’ past compilations, or are having trouble finding something you noticed several months ago, our blog has several features that makes searching easy.

On the right hand side of the screen, under the Geneabloggers logo and before Categories, there is a Search box. Enter any terms that you might think will take you to a post you are trying to find, such as the name of a region, as well as Gagné. (It will work without the accent.) If you find an article of interest and open it up to its full length, you will find suggestions for related articles at the bottom of the page.

You can also look down that column on the right of your screen until you come to Jacques’ name (it is the fourth name in the list) and click on it. You can then scroll backwards through all his posts. When you get to the bottom of a page, click on Older Posts.

Finally, below all the authors’ names on the right is a search function called Archives. It brings up all our posts from each month.

Thank you for following us since 2014, and good luck with your research in 2019.

Online learning

RootsTech announces free online conference presentation schedule

Great news! RootsTech, the world’s largest family history and technology conference held in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 6-8, 2014, announced today that 15 of its popular sessions will be broadcast live and complimentary over the Internet. The live broadcasts will give those unable to attend in person a sample of this year’s conference content. Click here to view the online broadcast schedule. Interested viewers can watch the live presentations at https://rootstech.org/. Here is the link to download RootsTech syllabus materials. Get on it as soon as possible because, according to Amy Coffin in her blog, The We Tree Genealogy, these are available for a limited time.The syllabus material is already Note the times listed are in Mountain Time.

RootTech-from-Woody-480x200

Watching live presentations from home is an easy, relaxing, and no-cost way to learn about genealogy and improve your research skills. The list of speakers this year includes several rock stars, such as Lisa Louise Cooke, Lisa Alzo, Josh Taylor, and Randy Whited.

So, pour yourself a cup of tea, grab a notebook, watch, and learn.

France, Online learning

Tuesday’s tip

Brigham Young University in Utah offers several free online genealogy courses, including one about France. While this course is not for credit, it is a great way to learn something new at no cost. To review the lessons, you must first enroll online. You will then work at your own speed and choose the time and place. When you have completed the course, you will have learned how to identify the place of origin of your ancestors, explained why you must analyze your information, and discussed some French emigration groups and sources to help you find your French ancestor’s place of origin.

A list of courses, including the French course, is available on BYU’s Independent Study web page.

Online learning

Webinars this week

Almost every week Legacy Family Tree offers free webinars (online seminars). The next two appear especially interesting.

Wednesday, January 22, 2 PM (Eastern): Irish Research 101: Learning the Research Process with Judith Eccles Wight.

Wednesday, January 29, 2 PM (Eastern): Ten Reasons Your Ancestor was in Canada with Kathryn Lake Hogan.

You must register to watch the live presentation. Or you may watch the archived version at your leisure without registering during the following six or seven days. A complete list of webinars, descriptions, and registration are available at Legacy Family Tree.