Genealogy, Genealogy societies, Quebec

The Beautiful Montreal Metro System

By Sandra McHugh

Genealogy is much more than filling in names and dates on a family tree.  It is also about the social history and context in which our ancestors lived.  It is about technological, economic, and social advances and how they affected our ancestors and changed their lives. This is why I love local historical societies and what they bring to local and personal histories.

The Montreal metro system changed everything about Montreal.  It improved the public transportation system and allowed people to go back and forth from work comfortably and quickly.  It also enhanced neighbourhoods and created synergies between different areas of Montreal.

The metro system was inaugurated on October 14, 1966 during the tenure of Montreal mayor Jean Drapeau.1 Montreal City council voted to build the metro system in 1961, and a year later, in 1962, Montreal’s bid for the world fair was granted and therefore the push was on to have the system completed in time for Expo 67.2 Expo 67, a celebration of Canada’s centennial, was held from April 1967 to October 1967.3

Montreal’s metro system is renowned for its architecture and public art.  Each station is unique.  Today, more than fifty stations are decorated with over one hundred works of art. Some of the more noteworthy pieces of art include the stained glass window at the Champs de Mars Station by Quebec artist Marcelle Ferron and the Guimard entrance to the Square Victoria Station. This is the only authentic Guimard entrance outside of Paris, although there are other subway systems around the world that have reproductions of Guimard entrances. 4

Guimard entrance

Guimard entrance to Square Victoria Station

In celebration of Montreal metro’s system and its fifty years, Heritage Montreal is offering architectural walking tours of the Montreal metro system that include information on how the metro stations transformed the surrounding neighbourhoods.  These tours are open to all for a modest fee and will run every weekend until September 25.  Heritage Montreal is a non-profit organization that “promotes and protects the architectural, historic, natural and cultural heritage of Greater Montreal.”5 You can find information on these walking tours here:

http://www.heritagemontreal.org/en/activite/architectours/

In 2017, Montreal will be celebrating its 375th anniversary.  Over the centuries, the building of bridges, roads, the railroad, trams, and bus and metro systems have shaped and transformed the economic, social, and cultural aspects of Montreal.  The Montreal metro system is a beautiful and integral part of Montreal’s heritage.  Let’s appreciate it.

 

1 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montreal_Metro

2 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_Line_(Montreal_Metro)

3 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expo_67

4 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montreal_Metro

5 http://www.heritagemontreal.org/en/about-us/our-mission/

 

Genealogy, Genealogy societies, Quebec, Resources Outside of Montreal

Société d’histoire et de généalogie de Rivière-du-Loup

http://www.shgrdl.org/

418-867-6604

info@shgrdl.org

The small city of Rivière-du-Loup, located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, dates back to 1673, when the region was given to prosperous merchant Lord Charles-Aubert de la Chesnaye. The town began to expand in the early 19th century and the population increased with the arrival of the Grand Trunk railway in 1859.

Between 1850 and 1919, the town was called Fraserville. Malcolm Fraser had been an officer in the British army that defeated the French troops at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in Quebec City in 1759. Fraser stayed in Quebec following the conquest and he was put in charge of the seigneury at Rivière-du-Loup in recognition of his service on the battlefield. (See http://www.manoirfraser.com/page/historique.php for a brief history of the Fraser family and their home.) In 1919, the town changed its name to Rivière-du-Loup.

Rivière-du-Loup’s economic base has always been agriculture and forestry, but many area residents have also worked in the transportation industry on the St. Lawrence River. The river is salty and tidal at Rivière-du-Loup and it is 24 kilometers (15 miles) wide. The city also serves as a service centre for the surrounding area. Rivière-du-Loup is in a beautiful location and its summers are cool, so it has attracted summer residents to nearby towns such as Cacouna since the mid-19th century.

The local history and genealogy society (www.shgrdl.org) has produced a number of French-language brochures and books, including family histories and several publications about the railway. See http://www.shgrdl.org/shgrdla.htm#items.

Three publications, researched and prepared by society members, provide genealogical information that may not be available elsewhere. They are:

 Des Écossais à la Rivière-du-Loup et leurs descendants – The Scots of Rivière-du-Loup and their descendants (1763-2004) – Marriages, baptisms, deaths – A book of 594 pages in the French language addressing more than 400 different family names among the churches of Rivière-du-Loup, the South Shore of the St. Lawrence River, Charlevoix, Saguenay, Lac-St-Jean Counties north of the St. Lawrence River plus the Gaspé Peninsula. The genealogist who researched this book transcribed records from the area’s Catholic, Anglican, Presbyterian, Methodist and Congregationalists churches. $50 + $10 shipping.

St-Patrice de Rivière-du-LoupSt. Patrick CatholicBaptisms(1813-1992)  $50 + $12 shipping.

St-Patrice de Rivière-du-LoupSt. Patrick CatholicDeaths (1813-1992) $40 + $10 shipping.

Today, the people of Rivière-du-Loup are primarily French-speaking, but many English-speaking families lived in the area in the past.Following is a list of Scottish, British and Irish families that lived in the Lower St. Lawrence region after 1763, including the present-day districts of Bellechasse, Charlevoix, Dorchester, Kamouraska, L’Islet, Matane, Montmagny, Rimouski, Rivière-du-Loup and Témiscouata:

Scottish, British, Irish Families of the region from 1763 onward

Adams, Achison, Alexander, Allan, Allen, Allison, Amsden, Anderson, Arbour, Archibald, Armstrong, Arthur, Atkinson, Austin, Ayton, Bagley, Bagnall, Baikie, Balfour, Ballantyne, Barr, Baron, Barron, Barry, Bartholomew, Bartley, Baxter, Beatty, Beck, Bell, Bennet (t), Berger, Bett, Birrell, Bissett, Black, Blackadder, Blackburn, Blain, Blair, Bolton, Bond, Booth, Boswell, Bower, Boyd, Boyle, Bradley, Briggs, Brogan, Brown, Bryson, Buchanan, Buck, Buist, Burgess, Burns Butchart, Butler, Caddel, Cahill, Caissy, Calway, Cameron, Campbell, Canady, Carmichael, Carr, Carroll, Carson, Carter, Cassels, Cassidy, Cavanagh, Clark, Clarke, Clement, Clerk, Clouston, Coleman, Collin, Collins, Colman, Connell, Cook, Cooke, Cooper, Cowan, Cowen, Cowie, Craib, Craig, Crawford, Critchton, Crockett, Croft, Crook, Cullen, Cummings, Dalton, Davidson, Davis, Davison, Dawson, Day, Dewar, Dick, Dickie, Dickner, Dickson, Dillon, Dobson, Dodbridge, Doherty, Donaldson, Dougherty, Douglass, Downes, Downing, Doyle, Drisdell, Drummond, Duncan, Dunn, Easton, Edgar, Ellement, Elliott, Ellis(s), Ewen, Ferguson, Fergusson, Findlay, Ficher, Fisher, Fitzsimmons, Flack, Fletcher, Flowers, Floyd, Foote, Forbes, Forest, Forrest, Forsyth, Foster, Fox, Francis, Fraser, French, Furlong, Gallagher, Gardner, Garvie, Gathwaite (Garwiitts), Gibson, Gifford, Gilchrist, Giles, Gilklet, Gillies, Gleeson, Glenny, Godcharles, Gold, Gordon, Grant, Gray, Green, Greer, Gregory, Geig, Grey, Griffin, Hackett, Hall, Halle, Hally, Hamilton, Hammond, Handfield, Hannay, Harbour, Harcourt, Harding, Hardy, Haresson, Harkness, Harper, Harrison, Harrower, Hart, Harton, Harvey, Harvie, Haslett, Hay, Hayward, Healey, Heaslet, Henderson, Henley, Henry, Heppel, Heppell, Herdman, Hibbard, Hill, Hins, Hodgson, Hogg, Holdron, Hoff, Holt, Holmes, Hope, Horner, Hould, Hovington, Howden, Howe, Hudson, Hume, Hunter, Hurley, Hutchison, Irvine, Irving, Jackson, Jacob, Jamieson, Jarvis, Jeffery, Jenkins, Jennis, Johnson, Johnston, Jones, Jopsing, Kack, Keighan, Kelly, Kennedy, Kenney, Kerr, Kidd, King, Kirby, Knox, Krieber, Lamb, Lane, Lang, Langis, Laurenson, Law, Lawrence, Lawson, Leach, Lee, Leggatt, Leitch, Leith, Lemesurier, Lever, Lewis, Lindsay, Lister, Litch, Lock, Lockhead, Long, Loof, Lord, Lucas, MacAllum, McBean, MacCarron, McCleary, McClintock, MacClure, McClure, MacConnell, McConnell, MacCourt, McCourt, McCraw, MacCutcheon, McCutcheon, MacDermott, McDermott, MacDonald, McDonald, MacDonell, McDonell, MacDougall, McDougall, MacEwen, McEwen, McEwing, MacFadden, McFadden, MacFarlane, MacFarquhar, MacGee, McGee, MacGowan, McGowan, MacGrath, McGrath, MacGregor, McGregor, MacGuire, McGuire, MacHenry, McHenry, MacHugh, McHugh, MacIntosh, McIntosh, MacIntyre, McIntyre, MacKay, McKay, MacKel, MacKelly, McKelly, MacKenna, McKenna, MacKenney, McKenney, MacKenzie, McKenzie, MacKey, McKey, MacKillop, McKillop, MacKim, McKim, MacKinley, McKinley, MacKinnon, McKinnon, MacLaren, McLaren, MacLaughlin, McLaughlin, MacLean, McLean, MacLellan, McLellan, MacLeod, McLeod, McLure, MacMahon, McMahon, MacMillan, McMillan, McMullen, MacNab, McNab, McNeely, MacNeill, McNeill, MacNess, McNess, MacNichol, McNichol, McNicoll, McNider, McNie, McSwanny, MacVey, McVey, MacWhinnie, McWhinnie, MacWhirter, McWhirter, MacWilliams, McWilliams, Malloy, Mann, Mansfield, Marshall, Marugg, Mason, Mathers, Matheson, Mathews, Mathieson, Matthews, Maxwell, May, Meaney, Meehan, Mellis, Mercer, Middlemist, Milburn, Miles, Miller, Mills, Milne, Mitchell, Moffat, Moffett, Molloy, Montgomery, Moore, Moran, Morgan, Morrin, Morris, Morrissey, Morrisson, Morrow, Mudge, Muir, Murdoch, Murphy, Murray, Nawling, Neil, Nelson, Nepton, Newberry, Nicholson, Nichols, Nicol, Nickols, Nixon, O’Conner, O’Connor, O’Connors, Orkney, Ogilvie, Otis, Page, Pard, Parker, Parkes, Paterson, Patterson, Patton, Peacock, Pearson, Pentiga, Perry, Peters, Pettigrew, Phillips, Pickford, Pollock, Pope, Porter, Power, Pratt, Preston, Price, Prior, Purcell, Quimper, Quinn, Rae, Ramming, Ramsay, Ramsey, Randall, Rankin, Rattray, Reader, Reed, Reid, Richard, Richardson, Riopel, Ritchie, Robbins, Roberts, Robertson, Robin, Robinson, Rodger, Rodgers, Roger, Rose, Ross, Rudiack, Rutherford, Ruthven, Ryan, Sample, Samson, Sargeant, Scherrer, Scott, Seaton, Seton, Shannon, Sharp, Sharpe, Shaw, Sheehy, Shields, Short, Simson, Sinclair, Skelling, Skene, Sladek, Slater, Smith, Smyth, Speers, Speirs, Standford, Stanley, Stein, Stephenson, Stevens, Stevenson, Stewart, Storrie, Stuart, Suck, Sutherland, Swan, Swinford, Synnett, Synnoth, Synnott, Tapp, Taylor, Temple, Thom, Thoms, Thomas, Thompson, Tolerton, Towers, Townsley, Trickey, Turner, Urquhart, Veitch, Vivian, Walker, Wallace, Wallis, Walsh, Walter, Walton, Ward, Wardrop, Ware, Warren, Watson, Watt, Watters, Wayne, Webster, Wells, Welsh, Whellan, White, Whyte, Wickens, Wilkens, Williams, Willis, Wilson, Winichuk, Winters, Wintle, Wiseman, Wood, Woods, Woodland, Wren, Wright, Yates, Young

Sources of the above listing of family names: Jeannine Ouellet, Dennis McLane, Université Laval, La Corporation culturelle de Frampton, Société de généalogie de Rimouski.

Genealogy, Genealogy societies, Resources Outside of Montreal

The Morrin Centre, Quebec City

Morrin Centre Cultural Centre, Quebec City

http://www.morrin.org/en/

44, chaussée des Écossais, Québec, QC, G1R 4H3

418-694-9147 ext 227

Jessica Kelly-Rhéaume, Library Manager

418-694-9147 ext 229

jessicakellyrheaume@moorin.org

www.morrin.org/en/explore-the-library/contact-the-library/

The Literary and Historical Society of Quebec, Canada’s first learned society, was founded by the Earl of Dalhousie, Governor of Lower Canada, in 1824 in Quebec City. Today, the society has evolved into the Morrin Cultural Centre and includes Quebec City’s English-language library.

The original aims of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec were diverse. It gathered historical documents about Canada, republished many rare manuscripts and encouraged research in all fields of knowledge. Over the years, the society played a part in creating new institutions that would eventually take over some of its traditional roles. For example, the society helped to save what was left of the historic battlefield on the Plains of Abraham, and it participated in the creation of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.

In the late 1800s, the Morrin Centre’s library incorporated the collection of the Quebec Library, the oldest subscription library in Canada, founded in 1779. The current collection includes a number of old volumes, some of which date to the 16th century, rare historical books and manuscripts and many articles published by the society between 1824 and 1924.

Iron Bars and Bookshelves: A History of the Morrin Centre, tells the story of the former prison in which the cultural centre is housed, and the history of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec. Published in 2016, it was written by Louisa Blair, Patrick Donovan and Donald Fyson. Louisa Blair is author of The Anglos: The Hidden Face of Quebec City 1608-1850, Patrick Donovan is a doctoral student in history at Université Laval and Donald Fyson, a professor at Université Laval, has published extensively on the history of crime, justice, and the law in Canada and Quebec.

The Morrin Centre does not have any research tools designed specifically for genealogists, but staff are willing to help genealogists find other historical resources. Upon request, members can access the centre’s historical collection for on-site consultation. The documents in this collection are listed in the library’s online catalogue, http://www.morrin.org/en/explore-the-library/library-catalogue/. For further details, contact the library manager (see above).

An individual membership costs $45 a year. See www.morrin.org/en/support-morrin-centre/become-a-member/. To learn more, visit the Centre’s website at www.morrin.org/en/. The website includes 25 short biographies of individuals who were important in the organization’s history. See “Prisoners, Students and Thinkers,” http://www.morrin.org/en/prisonniers-eleves-et-penseurs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genealogy, Genealogy societies, Quebec, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal

Finding your Ancestors in the Thetford Mines region of Quebec

If some of your family members worked in Quebec’s asbestos mining industry, they may have lived in the towns of Thetford Mines, Asbestos or Black Lake in south-central Quebec. Thetford Mines was established in 1876 after large deposits of asbestos (amiante in French) were discovered in the area.

Catholic records from this region are included in the Drouin Collection, found on the website Quebec Records (https://www.genealogiequebec.com/en/) and on www.ancestry.ca.

However, if your ancestor was an early settler in the area, you may have to broaden your search. Prior to the appointment of permanent Catholic priests in this region, acts of baptisms, marriages and deaths were included in the records of the Catholic Missionary Districts of Trois-Rivières, Nicolet, Drummondville and Sherbrooke. In the Thetford Mines region, this applies to villages located within the surrounding counties of Wolfe, Arthabaska, Nicolet, Frontenac, Drummond and Richmond. In each of the above districts, the records of baptisms, marriages and deaths performed by the missionary priests were integrated with those of local families who attended the regional cathedral.

One such Catholic Missionary Circuit was Les Missions des Cantons de l’Est, which was staffed by Irish Catholic Missionaries from Ireland who settled in the Chateauguay, Huntingdon, Beauharnois and Napierville Counties of Quebec. They were the Catholic version of the Protestant saddlebag preachers, or circuit riders. For more detail on these missions, see pages 65 and 75 of the section on Eastern Townships Catholic Missions, (Missions des Cantons de l’Est), 1826-1846, in the Genealogy Ensemble research guide entitled The Irish Catholics of Lower Canada and Quebec – Their Churches, https://genealogyensemble.com/2014/05/20/irish-catholic-churches-of-quebec/. There may be other information relevant to your search elsewhere in this document.

Prior to the opening of a parish, you should always look at the church records from older villages nearby. If both actions fail (Catholic Missionary Districts and church records from nearby villages), your family members may have been Protestants, or simply non-believers.

Before the establishment of Civil Registers in Quebec in 1926, records for non-believers are a problem, and you should look at notarial records. These will be addressed later this year with series of short articles in regard to the 10 repositories of the Archives nationales du Québec and the Grande Bibliothèque de Montréal.

Your best hope of finding Anglican, Methodist or Presbyterian ancestors from the Thetford Mines area is to contact La société de généalogie et d’histoire de la région de Thetford Mines and the Société Historique de l’Amiante. They have published a binder of birth, marriage and death records from the area’s Protestant churches that you will not find elsewhere. This binder, researched by local genealogists, is available from the society for $60. Here is the contact information for the society and the list of area churches included:

La Société de généalogie et d’histoire de la région de Thetford Mines

Société Historique de l’Amiante

671, boulevard Frontenac Ouest, Thetford Mines QC G6G 1N1

Stéphane Hamann – Archivist

418-338-8591 ext: 306

sahra@cegep-ra.qc.ca

http://www.genealogie.org/club/sghrtm/sghrtm.htm

Item #4 – The Anglo Protestants of Megantic County – Indexes of births, marriages, burials 1826-1991 – ISBN 2921320029 – Compiled by Robert Boutin & Paul Vachon – $60. CDN + 20% shipping – USA destinations in US Dollars.

The Churches: Adderley Anglican (1948) – Black Lake Anglican (1926-1952) – Inverness Anglican (1859-1970) – Inverness Church of England & Anglican (1848-1954 & 1981-1991) – Inverness Methodist (1853-1925) – Inverness Presbyterian (1856-1979) – Inverness Standard Church in Millfield (1927-1928) – Inverness United (1926-1956) – Inverness Congregational (1848-1849 & 1882-1884) – Inverness St. Andrew’s United (1957-1991) – Inverness Holy Trinity Episcopal (1921-1922) – Inverness Baptist Church (1871-1872) – Ireland Anglican in Maple Grove (1926-1972) – Ireland Church of England (1840-1934) – Ireland Holy Trinity Episcopal & Anglican (1915-1944 & 1981-1991) – Ireland Holiness Movement (1901-1913) – Ireland Methodist (1837-1878) – Kinnear’s Mills Church of England & Anglican (1903-1954 & 1981-1991) – Kinnear’s Mills Presbyterian (1876-1939) – Kinnear’s Mills United (1926-1956) – Kinnear’s Mills- Leeds Church of England (1830-1952) – Leeds Holy Trinity Episcopal (1915-1917 & 1921-1924) – Leeds Methodist (1877-1909) – Leeds Presbyterian in St-Sylvestre (1832-1912) – Leeds St. James Church (1925-1926) – Leeds Anglican (1840-1851 & 1981-1991) – Lemesurier-Thetford Mines Anglican (1947-1948) – Leeds United (1928-1945) – Lemesurier Anglican (1947-1948) – Lower Inverness Protestant Mission (1855) – Maple Grove Anglican (1981-1991) – Nelson Protestant Mission (1855) – Rectory Hill Holy Trinity Episcopal & Anglican (1917 & 1948 & 1981-1991) – St. Sylvestre Protestant Chapel Military Base (1955-1964) – Thetford Mines Anglican (1947-1948 & 1954-1955 & 1981-1991) – Thetford Mines Church of England (1907-1920) – Thetford Mines St. John the Divine (1917-1980) – Thetford Mines Methodist (1911-1927) – Thetford Mines United (1928-1945 & 1957-1991)

The following books are available at the Cégep de Thetford Mines – Département de généalogie

Contact: Stéphane Hamann –Archivist – see above for details.

Leeds 200 Years of History 1802-2002 (971-4575)
St. Jacques de LeedsKinnear’s MillsEast LeedsWest BroughtonCrawfordville (13th & 14th Ranges) – Goff’s Hill
Harvey’s Hill – Kinnear’s MillsLambie’s MillsLeeds Village (Municipality & Parish St. Jacques de Leeds) – LemesurierLipsey’s HillManse Hill (rue des Fondateurs) – Osgood River
Palmer RiverSunday RiverWilsons’s Mills
From 1809, Origins, Municipal Life, Religious Life, Economic Life, Schools, Social Life (including war heroes, sports) Health, Families & Organisations

The pioneers of Lower Ireland 1818-1980, Marlita Lamontagne-Ouellette

St-Jean-De-Brebeuf 1930-1980, Marlita Lamontagne-Ouellette

 Saint-Jacques-de-Leeds 1829-1990 Births, Marriages & Deaths (929-371-4575)
Denise Dion-Ouellette & Daniel Vachon

The Anglo-Protestants of Megantic County 1826-1991 (929-371-4575 R425)

Leeds & St. Sylvester Historical Sketches (971.4575 C9556), Ethel Reid Cruikshank

Kinnear’s Mills 1855-1980, Souvenir Pamphlet

 Strolling up and down Kinnear’s Mills (917.14575), Pedestrian Tour

Kinnear’s Mills, James Kinnear

Pioneer families of Leeds Townships, J.G. Kinnear

Megantic County Schools (371-00971457 S M496m)
Megantic Historial Society

Annals of Megantic County (971.4575)
Dugald McKenzie McKillop

Marriages 1815-1879 of St. Francis District (929.37146)
Volume 1 – A – L
Volume 2 K – Z

Births 1815-1879 of St. Francis District (929.37146)
Volumes 1 and 2

Deaths 1815-1879 of St. Francis District (929.37146)
Volume 1 – A – L
Volume 2 K – Z

The pioneers of Inverness Township1800-1978 (971.4575)
Gwen Rawlings

Saint-Pierre-de-Broughton – 1855-1996 (929-371471 P622b)
Thérèse Bolduc-Boulanger & Denise Dion-Ouellette

Maple Grove1918-1988 (971.432 M297)

A history of Megantic County (971.4575 B279h), Gwen Rawlings Barry

Inverness County (971-4575 I62)
Jean-Raymond Goyer

Kinnear’s Mills (720.9714575 G882k)
Ex. A and Ex. B (two books)

Leeds Township in 1802 and Saint-Jacques in 1902 (971-4575 L4841 V.1.)

1892- 1992 – 100 Years Courrier Frontenac
Souvenir Issue Thetford Mines Articles 1910 +

Finally, if you plan to visit the area, the Musée Minéralogique et Minier de Thetford Mines (http://www.museemineralogique.com/) might be of interest. The museum’s permanent exhibit features local history and minerals from around the world, and the organization sells French-language books about the area’s history and the asbestos industry; see http://www.museemineralogique.com/publications.html.

See also, “The Presbyterian Churches: Quebec City to Sherbrooke”, Genealogyensemble.com, https://genealogyensemble.com/2015/08/09/the-presbyterian-churches-quebec-city-to-sherbrooke/

 

Genealogy societies, Governance, Quebec

QFHS has its Certificate of Continuance

The Quebec Family History Society obtained its Certificate of Continuance from Industry Canada on March 6 of this year, according to Industry Canada’s website, https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/cc/CorporationsCanada/fdrlCrpDtls.html?corpId=2362252&V_TOKEN=1405560793699&crpNm=Quebec%20family%20history%20society&crpNmbr=&bsNmbr.

Meanwhile, QFHS members in good standing (meaning those who have paid their dues) are invited to a special general meeting on September 13. There are two items on the agenda: “approval to obtain our Certificate of Continuance” and “discussion for possible future changes to our Constitution.” The certificate of continuance allows the society to continue to exist as a not for profit corporation under the new federal NFP Act, and the bylaws have to be revised to be in compliance with the new act.

Members did not approve the executive decision to obtain the certificate and were not informed by the executive that the certificate has been issued. It is not clear whether the bylaws have already been revised.

If the bylaws have yet to be revised, the society is now operating under the Default Rules provided by Industry Canada. See http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cd-dgc.nsf/eng/cs04967.html.

In either case, there is still an opportunity for members to respond to the invitation to suggest changes to the bylaws, in writing, by August 13.

To read more about this issue, see Societies – Are they Changing, on genealogycanada.blogspot.com, posted July 20, http://genealogycanada.blogspot.com/2014/07/societies-are-they-changing.html, and the previous article on Genealogy Ensemble, QFHS Invites Members to Submit Recommendations on Bylaw Changes, posted July 8, https://genealogyensemble.wordpress.com/2014/07/08/qfhs-invites-members-to-submit-recommendations-on-bylaw-changes/

 

Genealogy societies

QFHS invites members to submit recommendations on bylaw changes

If you are a member of the Quebec Family History Society (QFHS), this important article is for you:

The QFHS will hold a special general meeting of its members on September 13, 2014 for approval to obtain a Certificate of Continuance, a document that grants the organization continuance as a federally incorporated not-for-profit society.

Also on the meeting agenda is a discussion of possible future changes to its constitution. Members have been invited to submit written recommendations for changes to the bylaws, which were written in 1992. The deadline for these submissions is August 13.

The meeting is open to all members in good standing. The official notice of the meeting was included in the Summer 2014 issue of Connections and can also be found on the society’s website, www.qfhs.ca. The society’s current bylaws can be found in the members-only section of the website.

The notice that appeared in Connections did not explain the need for this special meeting. The federal government has written a new law, called the NFP Act, governing federally-incorporated not-for-profit corporations such as ours. The society must revise its bylaws to obtain its Certificate of Continuance.

The deadline to obtain a Certificate of Continuance is Oct. 17, 2014. All corporations that don’t meet the deadline will be automatically dissolved.

With its wonderful library and charitable tax status, the QFHS is a valuable part of the English-language community in Quebec. Recently, it has also begun serving people with ancestors from France, northern Europe, Italy and other places. We need to ensure that the society not only survives, but continues to thrive.

Last winter, about a dozen concerned QFHS members, including myself, met monthly to discuss concerns about the society. In January, we sent a petition to the QFHS board, requesting a special general meeting of the membership to discuss changes to the bylaws. The meeting planned for September – almost nine months after the petition was sent — is a response to that request.

The members of our group love the society, but we are concerned about the lack of transparency and would like members to have more say about how the organization is run. This meeting call is a perfect example of our frustrations. Most members don’t know why it is being called or what steps the board has taken to meet the deadline to comply with Canada’s new NFP Act. Many organizations have already completed the transition process and, as far as we know, we have not even begun it.

We are also concerned that members won’t have much time for discussion during this meeting because a special guest speaker that we’d all like to hear will present at the same time.

We intend to prepare our own list of suggested bylaw changes. The QFHS bylaws are neither long nor complicated, and there are just a few key changes we would like to see, such as voting rights for members who do not live in the Montreal area, but who make up almost half the society’s membership. We would also like to see a limit on the number of times a director can be re-elected.

All members should take this opportunity to look at the bylaws in the members-only section of the website and send in their recommendations.

Also, more members should consider stepping up and running for election to the board of directors. For an organization like ours to thrive and improve the society for its members, there should be a rotation of new board members after each term. This rotation will bring in new expertise and ideas.

The special meeting will take place at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, September 13, Briarwood Presbyterian Church Hall, 70 Beaconsfield Blvd., Beaconsfield, QC. Please be there.

Written recommendations for changes to the bylaws should be mailed to: QFHS, P.O. Box 715, 15 Donegani Ave., Pointe Claire, QC, H9R 4S8. Attention: Robert Poole. The deadline is Aug. 13.

 

For more information:

The following link has a summary of the features of the new act and what societies need to do to meet its requirements. http://www.csae.com/Resources/ArticlesTools/View/ArticleId/1771/Navigating-Canada-s-Not-for-Profit-Corporations-Act.

For an introduction to the new Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act (NFP Act) prepared by Industry Canada, see http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cd-dgc.nsf/eng/cs04958.html

This page explains, “The corporation must replace its letters patent, supplementary letters patent (if any) and by-laws with new charter documents. This means that you need to submit articles of continuance to obtain a Certificate of Continuance as well as create and file new by-laws. The articles and by-laws must comply with the NFP Act.”

It adds, “Corporations that do not make the transition by the deadline will be assumed to be inactive and will be dissolved. For registered charities, dissolution could lead to the revocation of their registration as a charity, which would result in the corporation having to pay revocation tax equal to 100% of the value of their remaining assets.”

Another page describes the transition process: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cd-dgc.nsf/eng/h_cs04954.html

And this page is helpful because it explains mandatory and default rules: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cd-dgc.nsf/eng/cs04967.html

Finally, the QFHS is not alone in having governance issues. Here is a link to a series of articles prepared by the Federation of Genealogical Societies in the U.S. to help organizations meet challenges such as developing marketing and communications strategies, managing volunteers, understanding parliamentary procedure and running elections: http://www.fgs.org/cpage.php?pt=55

France, Genealogy societies, Research tips

Learn How to Research French Archives

One of the most experienced researchers in the Quebec Family History Society is also one of the group’s most generous members. Jacques Gagné, who has researched the records of the Protestant churches of Quebec, Scandinavian genealogy, the Huguenots, Loyalists, Acadians, Aboriginal families and other ancestral groups, has recently turned his attention to France. Now he is willing to train other members of the QFHS to research their ancestors in France. This is a unique opportunity, not only for anyone with French Canadian roots, but for those who want to expand their genealogical skills and to give back to the genealogical community.

Jacques has compiled links to the archives of 92 out of 95 departments of France into a single pdf document, which you can download from this link: Master copy 10 12 13 Les Archives départementales en France. Also included are maps so that you can figure out which modern department holds the historic records you need to find.

Updated dates: Jacques will be volunteering at the QFHS library on May 20 and May 23, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. If you are interested in researching your ancestors in France, come to the library on one of those days to learn how. Once you have experience in researching your own ancestors, Jacques hopes you will be willing to pass on that knowledge to others.

 

 

Canadian Province, France, Genealogy, Genealogy societies, Research tips

French and French-Canadian resources at QFHS

L’association Quebec Family History Society, à Pointe -Claire dans l’ouest de l’ile de Montréal, a une groupe de recherche francophone en plus de toutes les activités orientées vers les recherches anglophones.  M Jacques Gagné, un membre de la société et chercheur chevronné du côté de la recherche française, nous offre quelques mots et conseils:
” En plus de posséder un des plus grands dépôt de revues et publications anglophone des iles britanniques et du Canada, à part de celui du BAnQ sur Viger  à Montréal, la société reçoit plusieurs publication en français.  Le plus importantes étant:
>> Mémoires de la Société généalogique canadienne-française
>> L’Ancêtre de la Société de généalogie de Québec
>> L’Entraide généalogique de la Société de généalogie des Cantons de l’est
Les membres de la QFHS qui désirent devenir des experts en recherches d’ancêtres de France, devraient commencer par les publications à la QFHS.
C’est en fait comment j’ai débuté il y a plusieurs années”
Jacques Gagné
La QFHS a même un spécial pour nouveaux membres jusqu’en juillet 2014
QFHS_Logo

The Quebec Family History Society in Pointe-Claire (West Island of Montreal) has a wonderful library that is opened quite a few hours a week, and from which members from out of town may even borrow books by mail.

Jacques Gagné, one or our members for quite a few years, our local French research expert supports the  France Research Group at

QFHS.  Here’s his two cents worth about starting some French Quebec research:

”Periodicals at QFHSOver the years under the leadership of Claire LindellMary Plawutsky, Daphne PhillipsBruce HendersonTed Granger, Diane Bissegger, the QFHS Library has been a primary repository of periodicals from the British Isles and from most provinces of Canada.To my knowledge, only the Archives nationales du Québec on Viger has a larger collection of genealogical magazines.This article will only address the aspect of research tips dealing with France.

Three periodicals in Québec, all three kept at the QFHS Library are superior to others in regard to the French Canadians and Acadians;
>> Mémoires de la Société généalogique canadienne-française
>> L’Ancêtre de la Société de généalogie de Québec
>> L’Entraide généalogique de la Société de généalogie des Cantons de l’est

Others revues (periodicals) dealing with the French Canadians and Acadians are also stored within the shelves of the QFHS Library.

QFHS members who wish of becoming experts in the research process of ancestors in France, should begin their expertise journey with the French language periodicals kept at the QFHS Library.

This is basically how I started a number of years back.”

Jacques Gagné

The QFHS is even having a new-members special until July 2014
Canadian Province, Genealogy societies, Resources Outside of Montreal, United States

Facebook to connect on and on and on.

Yes, we are all connected with our trees, and the web makes it so you can get lost as one page connects to the next and to the next…  We genealogists are so curious, we can lose entire days brousing.  But sometimes at the end of a treck, you hit what you didn’t know you were looking for but needed anyways.

Fumbling around Facebook today, I found lots I wasn’t looking for. On the French-Canadian Heritage Society of Michigan Facebook Page, I discovered Katherine R Willson’s social media genealogy page  as I was following a lead historical and genealogical Facebook pages.  YES!  Browse throught the list and you may mingle with the right crowd gen-buffs on Facebook: the ones that can help you, the ones where cousins may be hiding, and the ones to keep on getting lost through genealogical maze on the web.  You may download the Facebook list but please keep the credits on each page.

Want to know more about genealogy, art and military family support?  Those are KATHERINE R. WILLSON’s favorite topics and she is writing a book about the use of Facebook as a genealogical research tool.  Member of many historical and genealogical societies, she is also a mixed media artist.  To know more about talks she gives, go to her social media genealogy page .

The French-Canadian Heritage Society of Michigan page helps us take walls (brick or other) down between Canada and USA to help our searches, and yes, there is a brickwall Facebook page

Facebook nous permet de rejoindre bien des gens, mais Katherine R. Willson nous aide a trouver ceux qu’on cherche: ceux qui peuvent nous aider ou des cousin.  Vous pouvez rencontrer cette conférencière sur sa page social media genealogy page .  La généalogie, le support de familles militaires et les arts sont ses sujets préférés.

Pour rendre Facebook encore plus utile, elle a compilé une liste de sites Facebook historique et généalogique que vous pouvez télécharger.  Elle nous prie de garder les crédits sur chaque page si nous diffusons cette liste.

C’est justement en me promenant sur Facebook, sur la page French-Canadian Heritage Society of Michigan que j’ai été référée a sa page.  Un autre lien Canada-Usa qui fait tomber des murs, de brique ou autres, page de Brickwall Facebook

Canadian Province, Genealogy, Genealogy societies, Research tips, Resources Outside of Montreal

Message in a web bottle

You may approach genealogical research like you would fishing — and just to bring it back to French-Canadians — ICE-fishing (OK I wrote the ICE word, but it’s going to warm up today!).  Instead of fishing with one rod, you set up as many lines as you can. The limit is how many you can check at a time… and how many holes you can dig before you are so hot you strip down to your t-shirt.

This is just what  a cousin did:

2001, Welland, Ontario: she sends on RootsWeb * a querry about my great-aunt Simone Viau-McDuff.  And waits.

2011, Laval, Québec: I’m poking around the web, put in Simone’s name into Google and find her message. Wow! For sure it’s the same person, but… the message is 10 years old!  No one keeps their e-mail address for that long. Too bad!

Still, I send my line to the water and reply. Next day, I get a reply.

Geraldine, daughter of my grandfather’s cousin, was jumping up and down in her living room when she got my message (just like I was when I got hers).

Like many Quebecers during the 20th century, her grandfather Philias Viau , had moved from Lachine to work in the Niagara region around 1904. He was my great-grandfather J. Francis Viau’s brother. They lost their French, but there are still some Wellanders that don’t speak English. The Welland canal was of great importance as a link between Lakes  Erie and Ontario. Many industries flourished along the canal, like The Electro Metallurgical Company unit of Union Carbide where Philias worked.

I went to visit Geraldine by train, learned about the region, met some great people. Among them, Renée Tetrault, a founding member of the Welland Branch of the Franco Ontarien Society of History and Genealogy now known as the Réseau du patrimoine franco-ontarien. Renée has served for more than thirty years as the expert who assists researchers at their Centre for Research in the Welland Public Library. She will describe the extensive holdings of their library in and offer suggestions for researching in Quebec.

Which leads me to introduce this French-Canadian resource: there are six regional centers in Ontario.  Three times a year they publish Le Chainon (paper or digital).  They have quite a few online resources (Ontario and other provinces including Quebec, and even American parishes) available to members, among which transcribed notarial records, BMS, cemetaries, family histories, cities and towns, census, archive guides, and a lot more.

Two things to remember:

When part of a family moves away, news and pictures are exchanged to keep in touch. Geraldine had pictures of my Montreal family that I had never seen and letters writen by my direct ancestors. The jewel: a cash book kept when Philias’ father Onesime Viau died in Lachine, where all spendings (lots of prayers in church) and income (rents) were described along with after-death inventory  and each child’s share of inheritance. The two of us were able to piece together family stories that individually we couldn’t figure out and dentify people on each other’s pictures.  Finding cousins will help you go up your tree in surprising ways.

Viau p
Onésime Viau and Antoinette Dorais with their children, Lachine, Québec

The other, send a lot of lines out, keep a log, follow up, but be patient. Be courteous, some will never bite, some are not interested. But dream big, don’t be stopped by logic and expect anything…fish come in many shapes and sizes, and even as messages in bottles.

* Rootsweb was one of the first online free cooperative genealogical resources. Ancestry has picked it up, but we can still go into archives or free.